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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 15, 1917 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-12-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ISTIANS

1''

I u

II

l lluu

Llill

I

lay. The recruit soon
a soldier--trim, smart,

ould attain success-you

Bloch

Suit

the man who wants to

I C®.

RQUARDT
AGE

Six'

ccesvries,
overs.

ex perienced men.

REV. J. X. WELLS SAYS "GO-TO-
CHURCH" DAY ONLY A
STARTER
Ann Arbor pastors have given their
full support to the plans for a "Gb-to-
Church" Sunday for students to be
held tomorrow, and the attitude of
many is expressed by the following
statement of the Rev. John Mason
Wells of the First Baptist church, in
commenting on the idea:
"It, is easier for me to express a
frank opinion of this subject by for-
getting my own church and my own
position in the city. My statement has.
to do, therefore, with, the other
churches and pastors, with whom I
am acquainted.
Higher Type of Ministers
"Every student should regard the
attendance upon one of these.churches
as one of the unique privileges of
Ann Arbor. Such ministers as these
churches have, can be found only in
college towns of the highest type, and
in a few of the larger city churches.
They have messages to give which
are of the highest possible signific-
ance.
"If one i to really believe the geo-
logy, biology, and other sciences which
are taught here, and at the same time
have a vital Christian faith, he must
understand the historic interpreta-
tion of the Bible. To fail to so under-
stand the Bible, makes it necessary
for one either to reject the teachings
of the University or to discard his
Bible. Because one needs, as never
before, his Bible, his faith in God,
and confidence in the results of sci-
entific. investigation, he should make
use of the unusual religious oppor-
tunities of Ann Arbor.
"The 'Go-to-Church' Sunday, tomor-
row, will furnish a good opportunity
for the students who do not attend
church regularly to make a break
from their old days and 4p fill the
churches to their capacity, and at
the same time fill their souls with
inspriation and light.
One Sunday Not Enough
"One Sunday, however, will not db
everything. If a person has gotten
out of the habit of attending church,
he may feel awkward and strange at'
first. To get the. most from the
churches and ministers, one niust
come not only as a sponge to receive,
but as a Tight desiring to impart the
spirit of sympathy and, good-fellow-
ship, and he must come with a degree
of regularity even as he attends the
classroom."
PENNSYLVANIA ROAD TAKES
OFF TWO SPECIAL TRAINS
New York, Dec. 14.-The Pennsyl-
vania railroad announced yesterday
that radical changes will mark the
service from now on between here and
the South. Two famous trains will
be withdrawn entirely-the Florida
Limited and the Florida Special, which,
have been used by vacation seekers
at Palm Beach and Ashville for the
last 25 years.
All sleeping cars will be dropped
from day trains. The number of cars
affected is said to be equal to three
full trains of passenger cars. The
Pennsylvania's action is the broadest
application of economy that has oc-
curred among the railroads since the
war began.

M

NATIONS HAVE HARDLY ENOUGH
TO MEET DEMANDS OF
OWN PEOPLE
London, Nov. '30.-(Correspondence)
-Germany is now be ieved to be ef-
fectually blockaded. Accordipg to es-
timates made here, she now is com-
pletely cut off from receiving imports
from other khan her allies owing to
the fact that the prevailing shortage
of foodstuffs in neutral countries near-
by have made it necessary for them
to withhold from her any imports
needed by their own people.
Virtually nothing is now permitted
to go , into Holland or the Scandina-,
vian countries from England, the Uni-
ted States or any other of the entente
countries. These now almost control
the whole world's exports of food-
stuffs, feeding stuffs, and raw mater-
ials of every kind.
United States Aids
This stiffening up of the blockade
is attributed here to the policy adopt-
ed by the United States in July of
withholding its exports fr'om neutral
countries near Germany except on
terms under which they oust cease
the export even of their own produce
to Germany. This principle was ex-
,pressed in London in the phrase: "We
will not send you wheat or fodder to
enable you to export meat and butter
to Germany. Until you agree to stop
your exports to Germany we will send
you nothing."
No Export To Germans
America's memorandum to Norway
as published in that country says sub-
stantially: "The United States will
regard all export to the central pow-
ersc as a subtraction from the food
supplies or other necessaries which
the country concerned should expect
to obtain for its own industries or
,support. It can hardly be expected
\that the United States will assist these
countries with necessaries if they con-
tinue to give help to the central pow-
ers.
Imports of oils and fats into Hol-
jand and Scandinavian countries have
,decreased from an average of 75,000
,tons a month before the war to a
;monthly average of 22,500 tons at
present according to figures made pub-
lic here. Imports of cerial and fod-
der, formerly 342,000 tons a month,
have decreased to 25,000 a month. Cot-
ton imports have declined one-half
since 1916 and imports of hides and
leather are now a mere-fraction of
what they formerly were. Copper im-
ports have declined almost, to one-
fifth their former proportions.
COUNTRY BREAKS RECORD IN
YESTERDAY'S ENLISTMENTS
Washington, Dec. 14.- More than
11,000 men, a new day's record, were
accepted yesterday for the regular
army. Additional reports showing
that 2,000 had been accepted, arrived
too late for tabulation.
The record is lac kby Pe nsylvania,
who supplied 1,441 men during one
day. New York gave 836, Illinois 804,
and California 495 men in yesterday's
reports.
All records for recruiting for the
navy were schattered yesterday, when
the reports showed that 1,026 enlist-
ments were recorded. The total
strength of the army and navy is now
473,114. The war department officials
expect an even greater showing to-
morrow, as this is the last day when
men of draft age may be taken in
through the recruiting station.
MAJOR-GENERAL ARRIVES AT
CUSTER TO COMMAND DIVISION
Battle Creek, Dec. 14.-Major-Gen-
eral James Parker arrived here today

from Camp MacArthur, Waco, Tex'as,
to take command of the Eighty-fifth
division at Camp Custer.
General Parker, who had charge of
Michigan and Wfisconsin troops at
Camp MacArthur when the camp was
first occupied last summer, has re-
turned from an observation trip on
the firing lines in France.
The arrival of General Parker at
Custer is considered by many officers
here to point to an early departure
for France.
Christmas Gifts of Artistic Value at
DeFries' Art Store.-Adv.

HEALTH UNDERWEAR
The layer of soft cotton on the Ins
The layer of fine wool on the outsl
The air space between the twn layE
garment and lets the body breathe. Th
from the inside cotton and drys it.. It
and dry-never feels wet or sticky like
DUOFOLD provides Warmth, Conr
much colds and sickness.
Yet it is a comparatively light wel
Come in-we'll gladly show you.
SOCIETY BRAND AND HICKIE
MAIN STREET

Members of the Fl

Flo
For Al

AL

- ; ,-
,, j °"'-
,
4 , -
r
, v '
'
" k'

Cousins

Schaeberle & So

Take home a R

/

t --I
an
s_ fo rm fit
COLLAR
6,e5ch 6r 3 ro'
Hot Rolls - 2for 6c
MICiAIGAN III
Ph..a 948-a. 601E . Lfberty
!! STOP AT
TUTTL ES
338 MAYNARD
ForLunches and Sodas
Dance at the Armory before going
I home. Last time Sat. night.--Adv.

r-
Quick Action
If you wish to make a

Old English
& Co. Phone

kL

at
Students'
upply Store

Professor Writes For Law Review
The American Law School Review
for December, 1917, contains an arti-
cle written by Prof. E. C .Goddard of
the Law school, entitled "The Bar Ex-
amination-Its Proper Time and
Length." This constitutes the sub-
stance of a paper that. was read be-
fore the American Bar association
Sept. 3, 1917, at Syracuse, N. Y.
U. S. Investigates Hoarding of Food
Washington, Dec. 14.-Representa-
tions that canned goods are being
hoarded in the warehouses of meat'
packers have caused the government
to investigate the matter. Those
feund guilty of the charge will be se-
s verely punished.

>o 11

LOST - Thursday between Campus
and Hill Aud., small silveit octagon
watch, initials C. H. on ba'ck. Val-
ued as keepsake. Please return to
Martha Cook Bldg. Reward.
LOST-Pocket book. Return to F. C.

Osias Z

10 E. Hoover Ave
lent with no 7:30 or
to work for board,
ween 6 and 7 P. M.
of Snow skis in good'
8.
)U RENT
Suite for three, $6;
,$4; Single room for
3 one. $2.50. Mrs. F.j
609 Monroe. 2236-J.

,N

Rounsville, 725 S. 12th St.
2466. Reward.

PhoneI

LOST-Why bemoan the loss of that
article when you can get it back
through this column.
FOR SALE

Ye Old' Time Sampler Calender, a
unique gift. Price 5 cents at Foster's.
-Adv.

The Well 'Knovn I
217 E. Liberty Stwet
Ann Arbc

FOR SALE
Bargain,
condition.
or 696-W.

- Miami Bicycle. Good
new tires. In excellent
Call 603 E. university

EASY
TERMS

CH RISTMAS
VICTROLAS

You are

lI:

Do your Christmas plans includ

MISCELLANEOUS
WILL PERSON who got wrong sheep-
skin coat from Engineering Shop
Thursday afternbon please call 1166.

At Grinnell Bros., and you can buy them on easy terms.
SPEAK EARLY FOR YOURS
GRINNELL BROS., 116 S. Main St.

papering your homde or a
[We will gladly help yoi
also see that it fits the
of your home. C. H.

in

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