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December 07, 1917 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-12-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ILO w!A

f TUo
TO

IIIn ftfUI
T GERNMENT

DIi

Ltd.

ARGE VARIETY OF
PREVAIL AS TO WAIT'S
EST CRIME

01' 1N ~S
GREAT.

COLOSSAL RESULTS
FROM NEW SYSTEM
INSURANCE

EXPECTED
OF WAR

For your
Xmas Candies,
Cigars,
Kodaks,
Stalionery and
Toilet Goods
Two Stores 324 S. State St.
1123 S. University Ave.

I

Co.

MAIN

4 STREET

yrT

RICAL

Large

tie SHOP
of Quality"
ive make it right
NE 27 -
ton 117 Pbarl
Ypsilanti

ES

d Sodas
isian and
Commit-

Paris, Nov. 25. . (Correspondence of
The Associated Press).-The question
"What is the greatest crime commit-
ted during the war?" was put by the
Spanish review L'America Latina to
conspicuous men in Europe.
"The torpedoing of hospital ships",'
is the reply of Field Marshal Lord
French, of Great Britain.
"The declaration of war itself,"
says Stephen Pichon, French minis-
ter of foreign affairs. "Among so
many ignominies that have been per-
petrated since," he adds, "I renounce
making a choice."
Destruction at Rheims Greatest Crime
"The great crime of Rheims, the
abominable destruction of the cathe-
dral, is the one that makes bleed most
the heart of a Frenchman and an art-
ist, but can one establish a hierachy
of crimes of the barbarians?" replied
Auguste Rodin, the sculptor.
"The murder of sailors whose ves-
sels had been torpedoed is the most
atrocious act committed during the
war," is the opinion of Sir W. H. Dunn,
formerly Lord Mayor of London.
Too Many To Choose From
"Politically the greatest crime cont-
mitted during the war is the violation
of the neutrality of Belgium by those
who had sworn to defend it," says
Monseigneur Baudrillart, Vicar Gen-
eral of the Catholic Institute of Paris.
"Morally, one is embarrassed to choose
among so many atrocities," he adds.
"The worst crime in my eyes is the re-
establishing. of slavery by the Ger-
mans."
Signor Vicento Blasco Ibanez re-
plied: "The greater crime of intel-
lectual Germany consisted in the
troubling of the course' of human
thought and the proclaiming of the
superiority of war over justice. All
the atrocities of the Germans against
men and things are only the material
consequenses of scientific barbarity."
Bryce Picks Deportations
The massacre and deportation of
,hundreds of thousands of innocent Ar-
menians while Germany, protector and
ally of Turkey, gave tacit consent by
its attitude, is considered as "the most
gigantic crime of the war," by Vis-
count James Bryce, while he says,
"the most abject crime of the war thus
far is that of the German government
carrying off into slavery hundreds of
young French and Belgian girls and+
thousands of Belgian laborers, oblig-
ing them to work against their own+
unfortunate country ruined by the in-
vasion."
Alfred Capus, editor of the Figaro, is+
also of opinion that "the most execra-
ble crime of the Germans was the de-
portation of French ' families from
Lille."
Germany Ruins World Relations
Maitre Edouard Clunet, the French
authority on international law, regards
as the greatest of Germany's crimes1
"the ruin of themoral foundation of
international relations by setting up
as a principle the right of the strong-
est to violate pledged faith as may ac-
cord with his interest."
"The war itself is the most atro-
cious act," says Signor Gomez Carillo,
the Spanish writer and journalist.
"No one can forget that it is a'Germana
war, prepared by the Germans. Every-
one. says so and the horror, the cruel-
ty, the murder, the pillage, and assas-
sination say so also." -

New York, Dec. 6.-Life insurance
men of the United States are ready and
eager to give all assistance in their
power to make the government's in-
surance system for soldiers and sail-
ors a success, declared George E. Ide
of New York, at the annual convention
of the association of life insurance
presidents here today. Mr. Ide is a
member of the executive committee
of the association and is chairman
of the insurance men's committee
appointed by Secretary of the Treas-
ury McAdoo. He described the gov-
ernment insurance system as "colos-
sal."
Final Law Satisfactory
"During the progress of the fram-
ing of this law much was said as to-
the danger to the life insurance com-
panies from what was termed 'the
entering of the government into life
insurance business," said Mr. Ide. "In
the form in which the bill was finally
passed I see no such menace and I
have felt that that menace was great-
ly exaggerated during the prelimin-
ary' debate and discussion. Even the
optional insurance feature of the bill
is not like any ordinary government-
al insurnace. It was simply intended,
I believe, by its -promoters to provide
a plan by which the enlisted men
should pay a nominal peace rate and
receive war indemnity, the govern-
ment paying the difference, thus re-
storing to him what was termed his
'insurability'."
No Danger of Goverment Control
"All danger that the operation of the
so-called life insurance article may
be used in the future- as.a basis for
argument in favor of governmental
insurance will in .my opinion be elim-
mated if the administration. realizes
the necessity of handling this new
department on a basis of credit and
debit similar to that which is com-
pulsory in the management of private
corporations, charging the war insur-
ance with all expenses incurred.
Will Benefit Companies
"No one, can realize how much is
going to be accomplished in an edu-
cational way when the dependents of
our soldiers find themselves receiv-
ing the enormous benefits which must
accrue under this bill and when they
begin to realize, as they must, that this
colossal measure made necessary by
our present war conditions is simply
an endorsement of the value of the un-
derlying principles of life and disabil-
ity insurance. The government has
by this law given to our business an
endorsement, not of a theoretical
character, but an endorsement backed
up by a financial guarantee the mag-
nitude .of which no one can properly
estimate.
"The duty of the insurance fratern-
ity is clear. We must do all in our
power to support in a wholevhearted,
patriotic way every war measure."
DYNAMITE BOMB THROWN INTO
WISCONSIN FRATERNITY HOUSE
Madison, Wis., Dec. 6.--A lighted
dynamite bomb was thrown into the
second story window of the Phi Kappa
Sigma fraternity at the University of
Wisconsin today.
Several students awakened by the
noise of its fall rushed to the room and
threw the bomb into a pail of water.
An investigation of the missile showed
that it contained enough dynamite to
demolish the entire house.

xIca
6 . Q

Suits

All,

THEY ARE MADE DIFFERENT

THE
Fountain of Y(
PLACE OF QUALITY
Give Her One of
WHWO WHY, YOUR MOTHER, SISTI
SOMEONE ELSE'S SISTER

T FURNIS
- -- VARSITY TOI
TRY OUR NEW KIN]
Peanut Butter Choc

p.

'ersity Ave-
lop Suey

handy, Delicious and 5
"Y" and "E" Card Index
Recipes. Here's a gift tha
and will be really apprecia
recipes are "Like Mother
Make." Each is wfitten o
Th) cards are filed behind
signpost guides. There a
cards for favorite recipes. (
ONE OF THESE OUTFITS.
away that clumsy, torn, tin
unsanitary cook-book.

Phone 1244-M
X[{f/l F
Np seYF Fountain Pens
Waternan
and ConKlin
1. Jewelry
zr & Seyfried
TO DRAFT LAW
LUDED FROM NAVY

THE MAYER-SCHA
112 S. MAIN STREET

men having letters from their
oards certifying that there is
ger of their being called for
ft will be accepted in the navy
ec. 15, according to dispatches
r received from the war depart-
nd no one who has been called
physical examination by his
lard will be eligible.
following requirements are
ry for admittance. The candi-
ist be between the ages of 18
years, and in good physical
>n. Men with disease, defects
ig operation, poor hearing,
res, or flat feet will not be con-
absolutely necessary to give.
f citizenship, for which a birth
te from prjoper state, city, or
authority will serve.
gn born persons must present
,pers of naturalization, and men
; age must also furnish letters
Leir draft boards showing that
ve not been called for physi-

Interesting Bits
One regular delivery a day as a
maximum for retail stores throughout.
the country is the objective of the de-
livery campaign of the economy board
of the council of national defense.
Philadelphians get coal on physic-
ians' prescriptions.
Kansas City has a women's motor
corps.
Wages of women workers in Ger-,
many have increased 54 per cent since
1914.
More than 300,000 domestic servants
in England are now doing munition j
work.
A stereoscopic picture record of the
war, to be used for educational pur-
poses, is to be made by the army signal
corps.
The father of one of the soldiers at
Camp Funston is going to send 1,500
pounds of dressed turkey to the regi-
ment of which his son is a member,
as a Christmas gift.

new suit
home for
CHRi
An order
swill be fini
of time.
pressing a
in g.

. .L1

A.

The Fresh-Lit. that picked up the
Aca- "account book" in the Floral Shop,
eve- Nickels' Arcade, Friday night, please
sons return it at once.-Adv.

Giant Pyramid Being Moved
Denver, Col., Dec. 6.-One of the
strangest and most difficult engineering
tasks that have been attempted in a
long time will be the removal of a
granite pyramid erected forty, years
ago at the top of Sherman pass in the
Rocky mountains.
This pyramid is to be moved five
miles and set in place again. It is
60 feet high and 60 feet square at the
base.
The pyramid is unique among
monuments. It stands on one of the
most lofty eminences ever chosen for
such a purpose, some 8,000 feet above
sea level, and commemorates the
names. of Oliver and Oakes Ames, the,
men whose constructive genius made
it possible to build the first railroad
across the Rocky mountains.
l ____________

Alumna To Leave Soon For War
Harriet MacKenzie, '08, formerly
professor in English. at Ypsilanti and
now enrolled in the graduate school,
will spend her Christmas vacation en
route for France. Miss Mac Kenzie
will leave a week before Christmas to
assume canteen work in the Y. M. C.
A. tents of the American soldiers in
France.
Why not do a little stopping
For a friendly bit of swapping?
Your friends will like the shopping
From the Foster House of Art.-Adv.
Dance at the Armory every Satur-
day night 9-12.-Adv.

Special

Near to

U. of M.]
Qui

I
COLLEGE P

111,

rAdvertisers.-Adv.

Leave Copy
at
- Students:'

Count von Bernstorff no longer has
the degree of doctor of laws granted
him by the University of Wisconsin
in 1909. The regents rescinded the ac-
tion this week by a unanimous vote.
President Wilson is the recipient of
a bronze medal given by the people
of France to commemorate the en-
trance of the United States into the

"College men and
called. upon to be. lea
sumption of the new
which present-day even
home to us as a nat
Edward H. Kraus.

et, Sunday at
sae and date an
333 E. Williams
Reward.
9WT

Anywhere in the U. S. will
you find the VICTROLA
Will there be a Victrola in
your Home this .Christmas?
,r116 EASY
Grinnell Bros. So. Main St. TERMS

war. Dean
of our
Prof. Lovejoy Talks To Foresters of Euro
Prof. P. . Lovejoy of the forestry,institu
department, gave an informal talk ing ins
Wednesday night at the Forestry club in our
smoker held in their rooms in the means
Natural Science building. His talk sources
centered about the lumber camp stor-J
ies concerning a mythical character U. of
known to all lumber men. - , I the

pm

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