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October 05, 1917 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-10-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

ENROLLMENT LOSS
PROBABLE THIS YEAR
RY COLLEGE LOSES 600
D ENGINEERS ARE 345
BELOW LAST YEAR
lment in the University is still

* * * * * * * * * * * * * *I

I.I . d

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AT THE THEATERS
YOU CAN GO TO-
"Odds and Ends of 1917," at the
Garrick.

-
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Calkins

Drug

LITERA
AN

:III Co.

"Miss Springtime,"
* ney, Monday, Oct. 8.

at the Whit-'

Enrol

*
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*

TODAY

below that of last year, though in some

cases there has been a marked in- * Vaudeville, at the Majestic.

I

crease over that of the beginning of
the semester. A decrease of about
1,300 will probably result from the
general falling off in all schools and'
colleges on the campus, but this de-
crease will not be as great as in some
of the eastern universities where 50,
per cent of the students have failed
to return.
The literary college yesterday en-
rolled 16, of which 11 were men and
five women. A year ago the college
enrolled but 12, showing a slight in-
crease over that of the preceding year.
At the present the college is 604 men
and 19 women short.
The engineering college is 345 stu-
dents behind the number of last year'
corresponding to the present date. A'
year ago yesterday the college had'
1,482 enrolled, while up to last night
but 1,137 students had registered.
Some 110 men are now enrolled in
the army stores method course, but
these men will only be in college six
weeks.
At the close of registration last
night the Medical school had enrolled
324 students, a number equalling that
of last year. One hundred and twelve
freshmen were enrolled, while the
sophomores had 90, the juniors 58, and
the seniors 64. Despite the fact that
the men in the freshman class are
eligible for draft, the showing is 50
per cent more than was actually ex-
pected. The sophomore standing is
also larger than it has ever been.
Last night the Law school had en-
rolled 169 students as opposed to the
365 of the year previous. The appar-
ent decrease in this school points to
a small senior class next year.
City News
Sergeants L. T. Chatterton, Clar-
ence Stipe and Merle Goodell, former
Ann Arbor boys, now members of the
126th Michigan regiment, at Waco,
Texas, have been recommended for
commissions.
Funeral services for Mrs. Catherine
Donnelly, 60 years a resident of Ann
Arbor, who died Wednesday at her
home, 220 Twelfth street, will be
held at St. Thomas' Catholic church,
at 9 o'clock Saturday morning.
The local chapter of the American
Red Cross is seeking new quarters.
At a meeting Wednesday evening, it
was decided to abandon the Armory,
present headquarters, on account of
poor heating facilities.
Colonel A. C. Pack, former resident
of Ann Arbor, has been named colonel
in command of the 119th battery of
field artillery stationed at Waco, Tex.
According to a letter received by
Dean J. R. Effinger, from Leland
Thompson, '18, the ambulance com-
pany of which he and several other
Michigan men are members has been
bombed by Germans, "Somewhere in
France." He mentions Henry N.
Brand. 19E, Alfred Thompson, Thomas
McAllister, '18, and A. D. Rathbone,
'19, as attached to the same unit.
Laboratory coats and Shop outfits.
Wagner & Co., State St. at Liberty.
-Adv.

* ____
* Orpheum - Louise
* "Golden Rule Kate."
* angle comedy.
* _____

*
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*x

Glaum in
Also Tri-

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324 So. State St. South U and Church St.

* Wuerth-Mme. Petrova in "Z
* Law of the Land." Also K
* stone comedy.
* Rae - Douglas Fairbanks,
'* "Wild and Wooly."
*

The
.ey-

n*
*
*

a:
-I'-

FINEST MADE-TO-MEASURE
CLOTHES
Everything that is new in wool-
ens and in fashions is shown in the
big line and we know that you
will be impressed with the display.

* * *, * * * * * * * * * *
AT THE WHITNEY....
"Miss Springtime," which comes to
the Whitney on Monday evening,
straight from its all season's runs
in New York and Boston, is a supreme
musical comedy success. It deals with
the story of a village girl's adoration
for a famous operatic baritone. The
baritone is to sing in the village where
the girl, Rosika, lives, but when he
fails to appear a newspaper man in-
duces an itinerant gypsy photographer
to take the singer's place, and Rosika
falls in love with the supposed Marco
and he with her, but the romance ends
in, a most unusual manner.
The company carries its own or-
chestra of 16 pieces, and the music
possesses a rare charm and sparkle.

PIANOS TO RENT
Best Piano in the city for $4.00 per month.
Celebrated Martin Guitars, Mandolins and Ukeleles.
Everything in Musical Merchandise
Schaeberle & Son Music House
110 S. Main St. Phone 254-Fl

MAJESTIC REVIEW

I

m
n.
'd.
st
S.
)c
Lt-
it-
cr
or

J

A real vaudeville show is on view
at the Majestic for the last half of the
week. A miniature song review, a
blackface team, and a couple who sing,
dance and fool, lead the bill.
The "1917 Winter Garden Review"
is a pretentious musical act, witha
dozen typical Winter Garden songs
and half as many scenes. The scenes
are to be commended, especially the
last, with a battleship for background.
Add to this the kind of chorus you
would expect to see at a Winter Gar-
den show, even though it is in minia-
ture, and you have the reason why the
act took so well last night. Of the
songs, the two the audience seemed
to like the best were "Here's a Winter
Garden Dolly," sung by Nana Belle
and the gardenettes (I forgot to say
that thecostumes of the gardenettes
left nothing to be desired) and
"There's a Little Scotch in Mary," sung
by Edith Adams.
Cooper and Robbinson are a couple
of dark complectioned people who are
worthy of big time. Their burlesque
on recruiting was a scream. Then
there were Rome and Wager who also
had a hard time to get away. A joke
about college was hugely appreciated.
Orr and Hager have a courtship in
song. The idea of the act is good, and
the presence of wits with which the
bridegroom met a slight breaking of
the conventions was the best part of
it. Dan Ahern bills himself "The boy
from your neighborhood." He cer-
tainly isn't, from mine; but if he
would cut out his stories and songs
and stick to whistling, he would be
much better.
The music of the orchestra is not
recommended to those who are inter-
ested in creative listening.
Coleman to Address Wesleyan Guild
Wesleyan Guild of the Methodist
church will open its lecture series for
the coming year next Sunday evening
with George W. Coleman of Boston as
the speaker. Mr. Coleman was for
several years a member of the Boston
city council. In 1907 he originated
the Sunday Ford hall meetings, which
have since been copied in many of our
larger cities.
Waiters' and Laboratory aprons and
coats. Cushing's Pharmacy.-Adv.
tf
Assembly at Armory every Satur-
day night. Admission 75c.-Adv.
Fountain pens, all the best makes,
at Wahr's.-Adv.

..ASSEFIBLY..

Saturday, October 6th, 1917
DANCING 9.12 ADMISSION 75c

Chat's Lunch Room

RAPID

SERVICE IN THE MORNING
BEFORE CLASSES

BEST OF FOOD AND COFFEE
CLEANLY SERVED

WE ARE OPEN UNTIL 2 A.

.1116 S. University

F'
F

CL ASSIFIED
FOR SALE
OR SALE - Three good violins.
Price reasonable. Call eveaiings,
1005 E. Catherine St.
OR SALE- Webster dictionary with
stand complete. Excellent condi-
tion. Phone 519-J.
WANTED

Baptist Guild Holds Open House
Open house for students was held
last night at the First Baptist church
on Huron street. A student orchestra
and games furnished entertainment.
The orchestra will also be on the pro-
gram tonight when students will again
be welcomed at the church. Owing to
the large attendance at the first open
house on Tuesday night, these meet-
ings are being held in the church in-
stead of the guild house.
The officers of the Young People's
Guild for this year are: Lionel G.
Crocker, '18, president; E. H. Wal-
worth, '19D, men's vice-president;
Emma M. Norton, '19, women's vice-
president; Esther L. Dorrance, '20,
secretary, and Lester H. Morgan, '19,
treasurer. Miss McLachlan, '18, is
chairman of the entertainment com-
mittee for the open house.
Opening assembly at Armory Sat-
urday night., Dancing 9 to 12.-Adv.
Laundry cases, enough for everyone.
At Wahr's.-Adv.
"Ike" Fisher's music at opening as-
sembly at Armory Saturday night.-
Adv.
The Daily's specialty is service to
everyone. Let us serve you.-Adv.

We make a specialty of silk
shirts .. All goods launder-
ed by hand .*. Goods called
for and delivered. . '.

a
i

WANTED--A club or fraternity to
board. Private dining room-smok-
ing priveleges. $5 per week.
Phone 164-R.

Dancing at Armory every Saturday
night-9 to 12.-Adv.

. .._

B-I-C

S-A-L-E

r SUMMER RESORT PIANOS
COMMENCING MONDAY, OCTOBER 1st, 1917
GRI N NELL BRO S
MUSIC HOUSE
116 SO. MAIN ST. ANN ARBOR

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