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December 01, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-12-01

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i

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, DECEMBERl 1, 1917.

PRICE

-An Y

to-
the

"QUIET" IS PASSWORD
ON WORDBATTLE FRONT
BRITISH ADVANCE ON CAMBRAI
FRONT SHOWS NO SIGNS
OF ACTION
(By Associated Press)
Nov. 30.-Comparative quiet pre-
vailed along the battle fronts except
for heavy bombardments in various
sectors. Even-on the Italian front the
fierce engagements of infantry, in
which the men often came to hand to
hand encounters,have-tuined into duels
between artillery in the hilly region
north of the Venetian plain and along
the middle and lower Piave river.
Cambrai Front Quiet
Around Cambrai on the French
front, where last week the British
forces made notable advances toward
the important railway junction, quiet
prevails so far as the infantry is con-
cerned.J

NAVIL RESERVE UNITS
HAVE MANYAPPLICANTS
MORE THAN 186 STUDENTS WISH
TO ENTER BRANCHES OF
SERVICE
Applications, more than 150, for
the new naval reserve unit have been
filed, according to a statement is-
sued last night by Rufus H. Knight,
'19.
Thirty-six applications have also
been made for the naval auxiliary re-
serve, reports Luther Beach, '18E, stu-
dent representative for this branch of
the service.
The men enrolled in the new naval
reserve unit will be permitted to carry
on their regular University work.
This course will last throughout two
semesters. Students who plan to en-

DETROIT POLI(
BO'BB AT OWN

Detroit, Mich., Nov. 30
10-inch bomb with an uni
ed fuse was found on the
dow ledge of the police
tion today. The city che
said it contained suffi
powder to have wrecked
building.
FRIENDSHIP FUN
SURPASSES 0L

Final Contribi

Final cc
Frindship
nl r h

ich started four In Palestine, on the line extending
miber of student from the northeast of Jerusalem to
will not be re- the sea, the Turkish forces facing the
tee until Monday troops of General Allenby are showing
considerable activity, but as yet have
to that the quota made no move in the nature of a gen-
ty will be over- eral attack. Several local fights have
undred dollars," taken place, however, and these ac-
Edward D. Kel- cording to General Allenby have had
ough the county results favorable to his men.
by Liberty Loan Germany Will TreatI
itors, little diffi- Following Germany's announced wil-
curing subscrip- lingness to treat with the Russian Bol-
sheviki for an armistice having as its
I in Chelsea st purpose ultimate peace, comes a state-
orts have been ment that Austria-Hungary is likewise
nittee. No defin- disposed. Already the government of
i submitted from the dual monarchy has sent an official
owns in Washte- reply accepting the present Russian
Ilcial reports in- government's wireless proposal for
0 quota will be negotiations. Unofficial reports say
that the Russo-German envoys will
meet at noon Sunday on the northern
TURE Russian battle front and thence pro-
ceed by train to the German head-
)C RATIC quarters at Brest-Litovsk to discuss
the Bolsheviki project.
dressing Cosmo. Units of national guardsmen from
es Russian all states in the country 'have arrived
"s ,in France. Some of the men already
are- training within sound of the guns
issian literature on the battle front.
cracy," declared
the general lin- Six s E
in histalk onS xrDeathsEn uets
before the Cos-! From DeerH u t
night in Lane Hun -

list in the naval reserve unit will notp
01,
be called upon to serve until they ta.
have completed the school year, while $6.
men enrolling in the naval auxiliary ty
will be given a chance to begin active

Eace the

"We trust that

work after Feb. 1, 1918.
To Be Placed in Service
Mlen in the new naval reserve unit
will be placed into' active service, eith-
er on lake duty or in coastwise trade,
at the end of the second semester.
Applicants accepted for the naval
auxiliary reserve unit will be given the
rating of quartermaster, third class,
and will be assigned to boats on the
Great Lakes or in coastwise trade,
where they - will follow a prescribed
course of study for eight weeks. Fol-
lowing this period aboard ship will
come a term of two months ashore,
and then again two months ship duty,
after which tle final examination will
be given.
No Date of Formation
No definite date for forming the
naval reserve unit has been received
from Commandant William A. Moffatt
at the Great Lakes naval training
station. "I expect to receive orders
from Commandant Moffatt before Mon-
day," stated Knight last evening.
Eating Places In
State Aid Hoover
Lansing, Mich., Nov. 30.-Since the
advent of wheatless and meatless days,
diners at Michigan's 2,000 hotels and
restaurants are saving for the soldier

closed will be successful i
scribing the University's
$200," declared Mr. N. C. F
retary of the drive in Michig
will defray nicely the e
printing, and handling the
here."
Two women's. senior soc
vern and Mortarboard, a
recent contributors to the
funds.
All members of the exec
mittee will meet in a conc
sion at 7:30 o'clock, Tuesda
Dec. 4, in Lane hall.
LABOR TROUBI
I WORRY EN(

Airplane Makers on Strike at Time
Great Crisis; Serious Results
Feared -
London, Nov. 30.-Renewal of lal
difficulties in England is causing dE
concern. The ministry of munitions
a statement on the strike at the a
plane factory of Coventry, said unl
the men returned to their we
the country's aircraft out]
would- be reduced when i
most extremerefforts have bE
made to overwhelm the enemy in
air and when domination of that e
ment is of supreme importance.

that Russia has

o the present day.
of Russia drew from,
ibuted to these great
stated.
Seldom Used
he speaker, satire is
ussian literature, the
>ints of society being
,ns of typic'al charac-
rawn to represent the
"What Russia wants
said Prof. Meader,
[on of the barrier be-
.nd a future with no
was in charge of the
ussia and Jacob Kas-
ded. A reading of
r" by Korolenko was
Barinak. '19, and Prof.
of the School of Mu-
up of Russian compo-
kowsky. Abraham M.
i gave a brief discus-
npositions played by
ood, stating that they
Russian-music as he
lussia.

Calumet, Mich., Nov. 30.- Thus far
six hunters have beenraccidentally kill-
ed, and a score or more injured during
the deer season which will close at
midnight tonight.
. The hunters who lost their lives
were: Edward Lester, Three Rivers,
Mich., mistaken for deer near Sidnaw
and shot by James Nelson of Three
Rivers, the day before the season
opened. George Miller, Escanaba,
Mich., fatally shot by stepping on a
"set" gun. Ernest C. Smith, Sault Ste.
Marie, Mich., accidentally shot by own
rifle. John Fitzgerald, Trout Creek,
Mich., succumbed to tetanus caused by
gunshot wound. Boy named Christie
of Dafter, Mich., accidentally shot by
own gun. ,
Among the more seriously injured{
are: Ralph Alvord, Clio, Mich, mis-
taken for deer and shot in thigh by
companion. William - Tachik, Pound,
Mich., shot through foot by own gun.
William - Karkela, Calumet, Mich.,
charge of buckshot through knee, when
attempting to pull gun from boat.

boys' and our allies at the rate of- 4,- at any

000,000 pounds of wheat flour and 5,-
000,000 pounds of meat a year.
Reports form the eating places that
are following the suggestions of Food
Administrator Hoover, for the opera-
tions covering the month of October
have been coming to State Administra-
tor Prescott for several days. Two
hundred such reports on meat-have
been tabulated. They show that in
100 hotels and restaurants diverse as
to class and location 42,591 pounds
iof meat were saved during October.
On this basis the saving for the whole
2,000 would be 425,910 pounds. On
wheat, the figures showed a saving of
316,960 pounds. While these figures
are merely estimates, in the opinion of
the state food authorities, they are
more than fairly accurate. The hotels
and restaurants tabulated were of such
a diversified character as to indicate
that all would follow about the same
ratio in the end.
)EALERS STATE THAT WAR TAX
FAILS TO CUT TOBACCO SALES
War taxes on tobacco have not de-
creased the sales noticeably, accord-
ing to statements of State street
dealers.
Of five proprietors interviewed, only
one has noticed any decrease in his
tobacco sale. The others said that they
believed they were selling as much as

,

Wages are involved at one pl
That was submitted to -arbitration,
after the ruling was accepted dii
ences came about regarding the c
struction to be placed upon the aw
Ultimately the workers demar
the masters treat with a committe
shop foremen.
The masters insisted they wo
negotiate only through the regular
ficials.
A strike ensued, aid finally the n
of the entire Coventry plant went
in sympathy.
Rail Unions Ask Increase
Meanwhile the railways and
labor of the entire country fac
strike. The rail unions ask a $
weekly increase. The roads offe
$1.25; the men refused.
The government thus far has -i
supporting the companies aga
the unions. The Liverpool dist
railway men issued a "go slow"
der to all workers, meaning the

,-

Luzar Itzkovich, '19E, commented on
Russian politics, and urged Americans
to support Russia in her struggle for
democracy, for by so doing, they would
be helping themselves. -Prof. W. H.
Hobbs, representing the national se-
curity league, warned the students
against false propaganda and asked
the co-operation of the various Pol-
ish, Greek, and Russian students.
Prof. E. C. Case, of the geology de-
partment, will address the club next
Friday night on the "Origin and De-
velopment of Man."

Jerry Parent, Hubbell, Mich., shot inI
arm while pushing gun under seat in
boat.
Although hunters were more num-
erous than in other years, fewer deer
were killed, mainly because theab,
sence made tracking difficult. -
DR. ANGELL SAYS MODERN
WAR NEEDS PROFESSORS
Poughkeepsie, N. Y., Nov. 30.-De-
spite the average soldier's lack of en-
thusiasm for the college professor in
the service, and especially the antag-
onism of the older officers, said Dr.
James R. Angell of the University of
Chicago, in an address - here today,
modern warfare has become so great-
ly a matter of specified science that
the professor has come into his own
in a sense never before anticipated.
Dr. Angell is a member of the na-
tional advisory committee on person-
ell of the United States army. He spoke

efficiency 60 per ce
legal strikers by
method.
Orrell, '21, To Edi
Robert W. Orrell
accepted the positi
of the Scout Wig

the A

usual and that they had ordered the cation of the Ann
same amount as formerly for their By Scouts, issued
Christmas business. Arthur Stevens of
The manager of one drug store stat- ing Orrell.
ed, that inspite of the tax which calls
for a greater investment of capital, re- Prof. R. W. Humphr
tailers were making a smaller per- "The Prophetic
centage. of profit than formerly. The subject of an addr
repson is due .to manufacturers, who Prof. R. W. Humph
pay the tax, raising the price higher department before

an:
ofl

rention 'at
ciation of

Isar

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