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November 30, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-11-30

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 1917.

I

A

COME
FRONT

PIGMY FLEET PREPARES
FOR FIGHT ON TINY LAE

HON DFEARS SLIDE
IINTO WORLD CONFLICT

om Death
ine

ic Port, Nov. 29.-The party
ican representatives, members
h had narrow escapes from
injury when they came under
machine gun fire recently
isiting the trenches on the
front in France, returning
i an American steamship to-
ermans, it appears, noticed the
activity in the British
caused by the visit of the
tatives, and thinking a raid
ut to begin opened fire with a
of machine guns. Some of the
.tatives, who were exposed to
of bullets,* promptly sought
ter of the dugouts, congratu-
hemselvesLd y had es-

ENTENTE FORCES AND GERMA N
SAILORS READY FOR UN-
IQUE BATTLE
Koritza, Albania, Nov. 29.-A naval
battle between French and German
warships is imminent, which, when it
occurs, will not be recorded in any of-
ficial communique, though it will be in
a way one of the most unique naval en-
gagements of the war.
\Lake Ochrida is a large body of fresh
water a few miles north, at the point'
where Albania, Serbia and Macedonia
touch. It is 40 miles long and 20
miles across, with mountains tower-
ing around it. The north end of the
lake is held by the Germans and the
south end by the allies,
Scene of Hard Fighting
It has been the scene of the latest
hard fighting, when entente troops
made a forward drive of 30 miles from
Pagrodak, at the south end, to Pada-
hoja, far up toward the north end.
With the Germans holding the north
end of the lake, they did not confine
their operations to the land. A minia-
ture flotilla soon made its appearance
with oil-burning launches about 15
feet long, each mounting one gun for-

PREMIER

WILLING

ONLY IN CASE OF SELF
DEFENSE

TO FIGHT

NE FOR U1
BURN OOD S Y
FUEL OFFICIALS
Washington, Nov. 29.-To help meet
the shortage of 50,000,000 tons in the
country's coal supply the fuel admin-
istration in co-operation with the de-
partment of agriculture has inaugur-
ated an intensive campaign for the

in1

The Hague, Nov. 29.-Premier Van-
der Linden in the budget debate in
the second chamber, said the govern-
ment was entirely united in its for-
eign policy and would continue to ex-
ercise the strictest neutrality, even
should the consequences be other
than hitherto believed. Its policy in
international questions would not be
regulated by fear, but by a desire not
to slide into war, he asserted.
The Swedish government, he add-
ed, had notified Holland that for the
present it did not intend to call to-
gether envoys from neutral coun-
tries for a discussion of economic in-
terests.
Shut Off From the World
"We are shut off from the world'
and our rights are assailed," said M.
Vander Linden. "Our government
always has held fast to what is con-
sidered right. Perhaps it has not
always found where the right lay,
but this neither has blemished its
policy nor weakened its position. No
beligerent ever has disputed our
ca ntinrrt "

RIS
ING

SEES
OF S'

y

COL. E.

Chief Talk of Rep
Unification of

substitution of wood for coal.
"One cord of hard wood is equal to
a ton of coal," said the fuel adminis- Paris,
tration officials. "One ton of coal is nationalis
released for use in war work for dawns to
every cord of wood substituted. Sat- supreme
istics show t ere is a gtnbunt of The confE
dead - .any fctions of the cal and
country at th pply of wood Americ
in ma communities is sufficient for war, deal
domestic purposes in those parts." matters,f
It ian

Nov. 29.-A
sm for the
day, with t
inter-allied

ay in-
John-

of Colo-
ebraska,
sas, and
of Mon-
of New

irs

ilLt&

Into Custody
ort for

very police
become a
organized
rmy, under
iounced to-
General

t plan ann
t-Marshal

ostal authorities also will
re part in helping to carry

regulations.
ughout the na

he

cted. to take into custody men
failed to report for physical ex-
tion or who violate any of the
ules and regulations. They also
be charged to arrest and deliver
nps men who have been selected
e military service and who fail to
in for mobilization.
the elaborate mnachinery of the
[fice department will be used to
hat questionnaires are delivered
men and returned by them with-
seven-day limit allowed for fill-
hem out.
eton Professor Issues New Book
aca,, N. Y., Nov. 29.-Edwin W.
nerer, professor of economics
inance at Princeton university,
rly of Cornell, has just publish-
new book entitled, "Postal Sav-
A Historical and Critical Study
Postal Savings Bank System of

Fleet is Menace
Th eets n e a real men-
a r It rte to the south end
of ake n , and bombed small
v lages along the shore held by the
French, Russians and Serbs. The head-
quarters of General Tarnahoff, of the
Rusaian division operating with Gener-
al Sarrail, was in one of these villages.
The French took steps to counter-
act this menace. A small steel craft,
30 feet long; was brought overland
from the French fleet at Saloniki. This.
mounted tpyo guns, forward and aft.
With it came a commander and a crew
of French. sailors. This was soon fol-
lowed by a second 30-foot boat mount-
ing two guns, with its equipment of
officers and crew.
Miniature Fleets Near Battle
Thus two miniature fleets find them-
selves face to face on Lake Ochrida,
with a battle not far off. The French
have the advantage of larger ships
carrying more guns, but the Ger-
mans have the advantage in number of
craft. Their flotilla consists of six
or seven 15-foot boats, mounting one
gun each.
NEWBERRY RESIDENCE GIVES
TURKEY TO a SMALL GUESTS
AT THANKSGIVING BLOW-OUT
Among the company who celebrated
Thanksgiving at Newberry residence
yesterday afternoon, were five small
maidens whom the members of the
house adopted for the day. Entertain-
ment of original and varied sorts was.
presented for the benefit of the assem-
blage which gathered in the parlor af-
ter dinner..
Aside from the indispensible corn
popping and marshmallow roasting,
members of the respective tables pre-
sented stunts, which brought to light
a deal of unsuspected talent. The
young guests to all appearances en-
joyed themselves to the extent of their
physical capacity.
Three Slackers Seized in Church
Winston Salem, N. C., Nov. 29.-Be-
cause they failed to respond to orders
from the selective service exemption
board, Vance Shore, Martin White, and
a man named Willard are in custody
at Camp Jackson, Columbia, S. C.,
today. They had been notified three
times by the exemption board to ap-
pear, ready to go into camp, but failed
to respond, being influenced, it is
claimed, by advice of the Friends'
church. The young men were arrest-
ed Tuesday night, attending a Quaker
meeting. The arrests stopped the ser-
vice, the church officials resenting the
appearance of the deputies.
Custer Not To Have Masonic Temple
Camp Custer, Battle Creek, Nov.
29.-Announcement was made today
that no Masonic temple will be erected
at Camp Custer. The grand lodge
came to the conclusion that to make
its work effective it would have to
build eight or ten temples and this
would be a duplication of the Y. M. C.
A. work. All Masonic lodges in Mich-
ogan will therefore be asked to throw
their support to the Y. M. C. A. as rep-
resenting all so1dier, irreanective of

VP

If Attacked, Will De end
Sub eqently the r said: "If
atta 11 fend ourselves
wit l4 ui ng to the propor-
tio to strength of ourselves and
our assailants, but save in self-de-
fense we will not enter the war. We
will not permit the misery and in-
describable sufferings of war to be-
foul our country. Moreover, by our
neutrality we are supporting the
ideals of the future-the community
of peoples-which shall be repudia-
tion of war."
Alluding to the future the prem-
mier said the establishment of a
league of nations was the only path
to international disarmament.
PROF. C. L. MEADER TO TALK
TO COSMOPOLITAN CLUB AT
LANE HALL MEETING TONIGHT
' Prof. Clarence Meader of the literary
college will speak to the Cosmopolitan
club at 7:30 o'clock tonight in Lane hall
on the topic "Russian Literature in/Re-
lation to Russian Life." Musical se-
lections from Russian compositions
will be given by Prof. Albert Lock-
wood. Other musical and literary
numbers have been arranged for the
program.
General meetings from now on will
be in charge of members of the differ-
ent nations represented in the organ-
ization. The meeting tonight will' be
In charge of the Russian students.
The public is invited to attend.
Enemy Aliens Ousted From Zone
New York, Nov. 29.-When the fed-
eral order barring enemy aliens from
living within 100 yards of New York's
water front went into effect today
there were anly a few families who
had not heeded Presidenta Wilson's
warning. Some of the business houses
had been given a few days' extension
to find new quarters. More than 5,000
Germans moved Wednesday. The re-
maining Germans were summarily
evicted today.
Barged wire fences are now being
placed around all of the principal
piers and soldiers with fixed bayonets
patrol the district.
Fire Department Busy Yesterday
Three small fires called the fire de-
partment out yesterday afternoon. A
small blaze in a church on Northwood
avenue, and in a rooming house at 714
Monroe street was extinguished by
chemical tanks. The department was
also called to the Delta Delta Delta
sorority, 718 S. Ingals. The blaze
was caused by an electric flatiron.
W. A. Burnhai, '09E, Gets Captaincy
William Allds Burnham, '09E, has
received a commission as captain in
the officers' reserve engineering corps.
Burnham has for some time been as-
sistant master mechanic of the Chicago
elev.ted railways. While in the Uni-
versity he was a member of the Ta
Beta Pi.
Corporation Gets Large Boat Order
Boston, Nov. 29. - The Submarine
Boat corporation has received an or-

atacker VDeris fairs she h
anne d byBaker this war bro
Never has
Men of Draft Age Must Prove Ability ering of sta
For Non-combatant Pos- seeing. Re
itions and republic
and small ar
Washington, Nov. 29. - So called One of th
"slacker commissions" by which men the confere
of draft age seek to escape service in house, head
the ranks and get officers' places in sion, sent I
non-combatant branches in the army Wilson. Pr
have struck a snag in two general bhe French
policies laid down by Secretary Baker. to Premier
Two Policies land is re
These are: first, that no men of Secretary
draft age be commissioned unless it is Bertie, Bi
shown clearly that they are better fit- France; ir
ted for special work to which they are of the B
called than any civilian beyond the Sir William
draft age whose services can be secur British gene
ed; and, second, that no function of coe, head of
the army that can be carried on effic- and Sir Ma
iently with civilians shall be placed on of the con
a military footing by commissioning fense. Lorc
the men needed to supervise the work. semi-official
Have Big Problem The Unite
The problem of commissions in the Sented by
various staff departments of the army and the A
;Tasker H.
that have to do with the supply lines,
transporation, construction and a hun- rests unon
fired other non-combatant functions T. Crosby,
the United
of the service is a difficult one. There
have been numerous cases of young America's fi
men of draft age who have obtained war. Will
commissions in those services and can ambass
therefore are exempt from the opera- been given
tions of the selective service law un- table.
der which the fighting troops are The Italh
mobilized. by Premier
Element Banned resented by
It is the desire of Secretary Baker,
apparently, to keep this element of the Rumania, G
commissioned personnel of the army negro, Braza
at a minimum in justice to the great have represe
body of the drafted men and to pre-
vent men of draft age finding shelter The chief
in the commissioned grades of the national reps
non-combatant branches of the ser- oFdination
vice. conduct of
side.
ENEMY ACTORS WILL NOT SEE Among th
"FOOT-LIGHTS" AT CAPITAL that the dir

of professor.Kemmerer's
y defined by its title. He
rehensive account of the
and present working of
vings bank of the United

anadlan Women Decide Draft Issue
Ottawa, Canada, Nov. 29.-Canadian
omen will be the deciding factor in
he coming election of Dec. 17. The
uestion at issue is whether conscrip-
on shall prevail . in Canada. The
Ature war strength of the country
ill depend largely upon the outcome
the election. The situation is coin-
licated by the fact that the patriot-
;m of the French population has a
ather lukewarm aspect as compared
ith that of the English element.
ethodists to Hold Party Tonight
Methodist students and their friends
re cordially invited to a Thanksgiv-
g party to be held at 8 o'clock to-
ight in the Methodist Guild rooms,
tate and Washington streets. The
arty will be informal, and several old-
shioned games have been arranged
give the guests a good time.

Washington, Nov. 29.-Musical and
theatrical organizations coming to
Washington during the war must
leave alien enemy members behind.
Attorney General Gregory refused to
relax in favor of 22 members of the
Boston Symphony orchestra, the regu-
lations under President Wilson's pro-
clamation barring enemy aliens from
the District of Columbia.
Washtenaw County Valued $75,225,250
Lansing, Nov. 20.-The largest. val-
uation of real and personal property
in the history of Michigan is shown in
compilation given out today by the
state tax commission, which placed
the amount at $4,022,507,720. This fig-
ure representing the assessed valua-
tion upon which state and county
taxes become due Dec. 1, compares
with $3,629,751,140 last year. The val-
uation is compiled from the reports
of county assessors in all counties.
The valuation in Washtenaw county
is placed at $75,225, 250.
Arrest 100 Italians In Raid
Seattle, Wash., Nov. 19.-More than
100 ttnlin "' m "*t. of "em "m"ner a

the cond
be turne
the conti
such as r
left to tl

The original pla
stood, was to have
deal only with th<
but it is believed
theater of operatic
cluded in the scope
deliberations.
Make Careft
Every phase of
canvassed and scrut
possible that a re-stc
entente's war aims n
is understood th4

time,
h hnc

Large Boat Order
.-The Submarine
as received an or-

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