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October 05, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-10-05

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THE WEATHER
COLDER; PROBABLE
RAIN TODAY

rt ioan

:4Aa t

DAY it 7 e 'IIT ''!J

I

.

VOL. XXVIII. No. 4.
/ SEAADOERS STING
ALLIED SHIPPING
IN SOUTH PACIFIC,

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 5, 1917.

GERMAN RAIDER STRANDS
ISLAND OF MOPHA; CREW
LAND

ON

SEIZE FRENCH VESSEL
LUTERE AND ALL HANDS
Put to Sea in Captured Ship Leaving
Prisoners Who Later Reach
Tutila in Safety
Washington, Oct. 4.-Two German
commerce raiders commanded by two
of the famous "sea adders" are now
stranded on the Mopha Islands in the
South Pacific after roaming the south
seas for seven months preying upon
American and allied shipping, accord-
ing to the report received tonight
from the. commander of the national
station at Tutila, Samoan Islands.
The dispatch transmitting the story
of the capture of the American schoon-
erC. Slade, one of the Seattle victims,
wap sent on Sept. 29, several weeks
after the two new raiders left Mopha
Islands.
The first put to sea on Aug. 21, and
the second on Sept. 5. Before com-
ing to grief on Aug. 2, the "sea adders"
had added the American schooner, A.
B. Johnston, Manila and Slade to the
list, and at least 12 allied vessels
which were sunk earlier this year
in the South Atlantic ocean.
The raider, according to the ad-
mirality report, arrived at Mopha
July 31. Two days later she stranded
on the island, a total loss, the master
and crew, with 27 white men and 17
natives prisoners making shore in
safety. The company remained there
until Aug. 21 when three officers and
two men put to sea in a motor sloop
" with' machine guns, rifle bombs, and
about two months' supplies.
The remainder of the crew remained
on the island until Sept. 5, when the
French. schooner, Lutere, arrived at
Mopha and was seized.
The Germans immediately put to sea
in her. Their prisoners were left on
the almost desolate island, but on
dept 19, 36 of the prisoners departed
.in an open boat and reached Tutila 10
days later. They were badly in need
of food and water.
MEXICO'S CELEBRATION HELD
WITHOUT DROP OF LIQUOR
Mexico City, Oct. 4.-Drunkenness
was absolutely eliminated from the
107th celebration of the anniversary of
Mexico's independence. All bars, sa-.
loons and places where liquor is sold
were closed on the night of Sept. 14,
and were not reopened until Sept. 15.
On the night of Sept. 15, when the
president of the republic rang the
same bell used by Hidalgo to summon
the people when he proclaimed the
independence of Mexico from Spain,
the Zocalo or plaza before the national
palace was filled with a crowd of
more than 55,000 persons and it is be-
lieved there was not an intoxicated
person among them. Throughout the
three days of celebration, the streets
9! the capital were filled with people,
horns were blown, confetti was scat-
tered, and horseplay was indulged in
but there were no serious disorders.
DR. ELOISE WALKER SUCCEEDS
DR. PRATT AT HEALTH SERVICE
Dr. Eloise Walker, '93, '96M, has
been appointed to succeed Dr. Elsie
Seelye Pratt, 'p4M, as woman's phy-
sician in the 'Universitj health serv-
ice. Dr. Pratt has resigned and re-
turned to Denver, where she will re-
sume a partnership with Dr. Frazier,
. which was interrupted when she took
up her work in the Jniversity.
At present Dr. Walker is a mem-
br of the staff in the New York state

hospital at Binghamton, N. Y., but she
will come to Ann Arbor next week to
take up her work in the University.
"Once a Week Dances" Not True
om' .. eonsu

ANN ARBOR OBEYS
FOOD DICTATOR
Wheatless and Meatless Days Begin
in Local Homes, Hotels, and
Restaurants
Wheatless and meatless days are
now in vogue in Ann Arbor in hotels,
restaurants, private homes and board-
ing houses.
The Allenel and Whitney hotels
serve fish but no meat on Tuesdays
and no food containing wheat on Wed-
nesdays. This is in accordance with
the scheme of Food Administrator
Prescott.
"How do our patrons like it? Why
any patriotic citizen if asked to eat
meat or wheat on these days would
be insulted," was the reply received
from the Whitney hotel.
"All our patrons were satisfied,"
said the Allenel management.
Restaurants served more fish Wed-
nesday than they do as a rule on Fri-
days. One fish dealer complained that
he could scarcely fill hi orders and
that there was a decided increase in
next week's orders already.
The Sam Heusel Bakery company
announced that its sales of white
bread on Wednesdays had taken a de-
cided drop'and that rye and graham
bread orders had been substituted to a
large extent.
Corn bread is also being used as a
substitute for wheat products at the
various hotels.
Some of the fraternity houses are
considering te wheatless and meat-
less days and several of the boarding
clubs .expect to follow the lead taken
by the hotels.
Local meat dealers assert they have
noticed no appreciable decrease in or-'
ders since the campaign was inaug-
urated.
NEW TRA1IiNG CAMPS
EXCLUDE FORT SHERIDA
THIID SERIES OF AMPS WILL
BEGIN JAN. 5; ANY SOL
DIER ELIGIBLE1
Fort Sheridan will be abolished a
an officers' training camp at the close
of th present course which ends Nov.-
27. A third series of camps were yes-I
terday authorized by the war depart-
ment and are to be situated at the 16
national guard camps, the 16 national
army cantonments and the regular
army concentration points at Fort
Bliss, Tex., Fort Sam Houston, Tex.,
and Chicamaugua, Tenn.E
Only soldiers of the regular army,
national army and national guard willj
be admitted to this course which will
open Jan. 5 and close April 5. Anya
private or non-commissioned officer
may apply but civilians will be en-,
tirely excluded.
Company commanders will choose
not more than 10 per cent of the en-
listed men of the company from those
who apply. A board of regular of-
ficers will select a number of theses
not to exceed 1.7 per cent of the en-
tire strength in any one division toI
try for commissions.
NEW LAW REVIEW STAFF
MEMBERS TO BE ELECTED
New staff members of the Michigan
Law Review will be elected today.
The magazine is to be published this
year the same as in the past years.
although several prospective members.
have been taken in the enlistments

and the draft.
Dr. M. W. Gardner to Teach Botany
Dr. Max W. Gardner of the Univer-
sity of Wisconsin has arrived in Ann.
Arbor to substitute for Dr. C. H. Kauff--
mann in the botanical laboratory. Dr..
Kauffmann has been granted a leave
of absence for a year and will make!
a study of plant diseases under the-
federal government survey.

MCiGNSPIRiT
Is FORFRESHMEN
University Songs and Yells Will Be
Taught to Yearlings at
Mass Meeting
1921 MEN WILL GATHER IN
HILL AUDITORIUM TONIGHT
Music and Smokes at the Union for
First Year Men Will
Follow
Freshmen are to be given an intro-
duction to genuine Michigan spirit at
a monster mass meeting at 7 o'clock
tonight in Hill auditorium. At this
meeting the yearlings will be given
the opportunity to participate in the
yelling of Michigan yells and the sing-
ing of Michigan songs.
From the second the curtain rises
with the Varsity band, led by Major
Wilfred Wilson, playing "The Star
Spangled Banner," until the last note
of "The Yellow an'd the Blue" fades
away the meeting will be one that
will always becremembered and
cherished by the class of '21.
Kenneth N. Westerman and Frank
A. Taber, '17, accompanist, will teach
the freshmen Michigan's songs. The
yells will be led by Red Donnelly, '18L.
S. S. Attwood, '18E, president of the
student council, will preside over the
meeting.
Members of Faculty to Speak
Prof. Ralph W. Aigler of the Law
school, Lieutenant G. C. Mullen, in-
structor in military science, and Prof.
William D. Henderson will be the
speakers of the evening. The addresses
will deal with current topics that are
of interest to every freshman in the
University.
Special seating arrangements have
been made, the middle section of the
main floor being reserved for fresh-
men who wear their class caps. The
football team will occupy the first
row, and the side sections will be set
aside for the upperclassmen. Admit-
tance to the first balcony is open to
the entire student body upon the pre-
sentation of the athletic coupon books,
which must also be presented for en-
trance to the main floor. The second
balcony is open to the general public.
Refreshments at Union
Inimediately after the ceremonies
the yearlings will be entertained at
the Union. Music and an abundance
of smokes and refreshments are prom-
ised for the freshmen. It has been
emphasized by the Union officials that
the reception is primarily for the bene-
fit of the first year men and that it is
impossible to entertain the entire stu-
dent body at this time.
STATE BAR EXAMINER WILL
LECTURE TO LAWS AND MEDICS
The first of a series of lectures on
medical jurisprudence delivered to
senior medical and law students will
begin this afternoon at 4 o'clock in
room C of the Law building. Clarence
A. Lightner of the Detroit bar, chair-
man of the state board of bar exam-
iners, will give the lectures eveigFri-
fay with the exceptions of Convoca-
tion and Thanksgiving weeks.
Lectures usually given by Dr. V. C.
Vaughan which touch on medical
jurisprudence fro the medical stand-
point will be omitted this year as he
has resigned his position and is now

serving as a major in the regular
army doing sanitary work.
Alpha Nu to Begin New Year Tonight
Alpha Nu debating society will meet
for the first time this year at 7:30
o'clock tonight in the society's rooms in
University hall. A president, vice-presi-
dent and secretary will be elected and
a general outlook of the future will
be discussed. All members are urged
to attend.

ATTENTION
I desire to meet all men of
the first and second year classes
in the College of Literature,
Science, and the Arts and the
Colleges of Engineering and
Architecture in University Hall
at 4 o'clock, Friday afternoon,
Oct. 5. All should attend the
meeting, which will be over in
ample season for those who are
taking military training to re-
port for duty at 4:30 o'clock.
HARRY B. HUTCHINS,
President.
19038 APPEAr0FO
MILITARY1TRAINING
Many More Will Be Listed When
Cards Are Returned from
Offices
LIEUT. G. A. MULLEN IN CHARGE
OF 13 NEW DRILL COMPANIES
First Work Directed on Campus But
Better Facilities Promised as
Soon as Possible
The military training courses undar
Lieut. G. A. Mullen of the United
States army had 1,038 students en-
rolled at the second meeting at 4:30
o'clock yesterday afternoon. A num-
ber more students have registered but
the special orange cards were turned
into the various colleges and have not
yet been classified.
Despite the fact that the weather
was a trifle damp and that rain threat-
ened to hinder operations, the men
were divided into squads of eight with
a competent instructor in charge of
each.
Immediately after the 13 companies'
werecformed preliminary drills were
directed for an hour on the campus
between Waterman gymnasium and
the Law building. In a short time it
is expected that more suitable grounds
will be provided to enable the men to
drill with the maximum amount of ef-
ficiency.
"A large num of students should
take advantage of this military train-
ing," said Lieut. Mullen. "This course
is especially beneficial to those en-
rolled on account of the physical,
mental, and moral betterment it gives
to the students which increases their
ability to serve the country when men
are needed."
Anyone who has not yet enrolled
and cares to register may do so at
4:30 o'clock this afternoon outside of
Waterman gymnasium. The special
military enrollment card must be pre-
sented before entering the course.
ANGELL DAY NOT TO BE
OBSERVED THIS YEAR
Angell day which was set aside last
year by the state department of edu-
cation to be observed in all schools
and colleges in commemoration of
Michigan's late president, will not be
repeated this year.
Because of the fact that Dr. Angell's
death occurred in the school year of
1915-1916, the state department wished
last year to pay tribute once more to
her great educator, but the memorial
will not be an annual event.
80 UPPERCLASS WOMEN LEAVE
OTHER SCHOOLS FOR MICHIGAN

Upperclass women to the number of
80, coming from 46 colleges, rein-
force Michigan ranks this fall. Four
eastern colleges for women besides
four western co-educational univer-
sities are among the schools waiveds
in preference to Michigan.
These women increase the numbers
of the sophomore and senior classes
by 16 and 17 respectively, while the
junior class is swelled by 47.

SECOND
START
WASHTENAW
QUET

LIBERTY LOAN CAM P!g
WITH RUSH, ASBI V
RINLIEALSUSRIPT
COUNTY CAMPAIGN TO OPEN MOND! N ;; .ii
GIVEN 250 VOLUNTEER SOLICITORS; ,'UTV 1$
TO RAISE $2,422,875; ANN ARBOR $52uMi31
tions Give Millions; Bonds Will B rXm u ' . .- ,

Great Corpora

Even Camp Custer Boys
Do Their Bit
With subscriptions for the second
Liberty loan of $3,000,000,000 on the
increase in every federal reserve dis-
trict, its promoters are confident of
an early, successful conclusion. New
York's subscriptions reached a total
of $135,000,000 Wednesday. The
amount was aided by two $10,000,000
subscriptions from the United States
Steel corporation and the Mutual Life
Insurance company. Nearly 37,000 mu-
nicipal employees in New York who
subscribed to the first issue will take
some of the second loan bonds.
Chicago has revived the Four-Min-
ute Men, speakers, who will talk in
theaters and public assemblies for the
fund. The Chicagoans have organized
themselves into squadrons called
"Bankers," "Lawyers/' "Knights of
Columbus," "Masonic," "B. P. 0. E.',
and "Woodmen of the World." The
volunteer system used is working well.
Speakers of foreign tongues will take
the campaign into the settlements of
the city. Many German born Ameri-
cans are coming to the front with
funds.
Although their pay is small, it is
not going to prevent soldiers at Camp
Custer from buying bonds, according
to word received Thursday. Themen
in the national army are ready not
only to carry a rifle, but they are also
willing to help buy the rifle.
"Uncle Sam is welcome to all we
have," said one "doughboy."

(C ltS tJ(i r w. i: 1io* r

Gay Sophs Cast
Burden on F'rosh
All Who Have Failed to Enroll in
Classes Must Report Im-
mediately
The gay young sophomore girls are
much too busy to attend gymnasium
classes. They have left that childish
pastime to the Kelly-hued freshmen
who have registered with scrupulous
promptness to the number of 250.
Wandering somewhere in the stu-
dent throng are 50 unsuspecting soph-
omores who will be .given a last op-
portunity to display their ability as
impromptu excuse makers unless they
immediately turn their attention to
the northeast corner of the campus..
Regular gymnasium classes will be-
gin Oct. 11. Notice of section assign-
ments will be posted on the bulletin
board at Barbour gymnasium Oct. 9.
FIVE STUDENT COUNCIL MEN
DO NOT RETURN THIS YEAR
Five members of the student council
have not returned to the University
this year because of the war. All these
men enlisted in some branch of the
service and some of them are now
serving in France.
Those who -have not returned are
Wm. H. Hogan, '17; Guy A. Reem, '18;
Howard Hatch, '18; Jerome Zeigler,
'19M; Paul .O. Davis, '18E. The va-
cancies will be filled by election some
time in the near future at a meeting

Washtenaw cou nty's lihty loan
campaign forn a-y uopus NI nday
night, Oct. 8, at a banu nuer o -ie e'
the 250 volunteer soli( Usf or th.
county, at the cir Y. M. . A Fed-
erick R. Fenton. chu ci r of thered -
eral Reserve Bank o f ---i'wll be
the principal sca o -fai evenig.
'Besides Mr. Fenou u-u 'nee wiv- I pro-
minent speaker. rom Doit and
Jackson, as well a us of local pro-
eminence.
"Have you a Libnlrv bond" i ste
slogan adopted by C h-ur: Geoge
W. Mullen of the oun v &umnmitte
Mr. Millen said esray, "Th
state of Michigan is to rue $2,i 5O
000, Washtenaw a m !e being
$2,422,875. We h earm dy250men
who have pledged .i. e* l. s athlp
in the disti'ibution '-s he''ou :-an
with the addition al he spo f iBoy
Scouts and the -'s1 A ay,f
have no doubt tath e amomt
will be subscribed toin a sr't tm."
Ann Arbor's share of t : eum nd'o
be sold is $520,43.:. u- ''neIb vimae
already been sol ,a thei clbanks
and it is expectl by tem u.omit.e
that this amount will b -eatye'--,
subscribed.
Mr. Francis Bacon '2dire'or of
social activities ot u i ftchica- Tu nion
has been given full control or the
sale of bonds among he studentsr.
'Bacon will formuats Pmhi plans in a
few days and wi organize the st--
dents for financial He pin this crisis.
All the local and county plans hanve
already been completed and the vo'
unteers are only wait i for ho star t-
ing signal to be gien at Monday
night's banquet.
NEW RED CROSS C A1 RSE OFFER
OPEN TO A LL 42iE AT "Y"
Interest amonn Ann Aor wome
and University gris in Red Cros
home nursing and byg ieu has result-
ed in a new o'pportonitA at the city
Y. W. C. A.
A course of 15 lessons for the regu-
lar price of $3.00, wihCs includes text-
books and materia, i begin next
week. Universityi w ome i ncry enrol
at the city association or at Newberr:
hall.
WOMEN'SLEAGUE TO HOLD
PARTY FOR NEW (4leLS 18FRIDA
-New girls can get aquainted at the
first Women's league party fro, 4
to 6 o'clock on Friday afternoon, at
Barbour gymnasimu.
Every woman in the Universiry, and
freshmen in particular are urged to
attend. The socia commine of Lich
Nona Myers, '1, is clairrnan, is
rumored to have ,ome unque schenes
of entertainment up its sleeve.
Roy Fricken Is Iehyefd b yIlness
Roy Friclon, '19, asociate edito
of the Gargoyle. Has been- detaine
at his home in Grundy Cente, Iowa,
by a serious illness ois expected
to return about Nov. 1:
* POLICE WARN M OTRISTS *
OF CITY TRiAFFIC RUES *s
* The police epnai mnt ha is
* sued the following warning to all *
* students who own automobiles: *
* Care should be taken not to use *
* glaring headligts"in the city 1mm
its.
* Motorists are warned aga
* using cutouts or making ny ot
* unnecessary noises
S ParallelariAng of ears must be
observedan all paved strets 0 *
twe -< Liberty and William streets. *

.'.'C 2 c; 'g ~ ay- v~la- *
I : rico ' , h e or.,e~-

;

of the council.

..
._.___ _._. .ter..
f """"'"

NORMAL COLLEGE CONCERT COURSE
FREDERICK ALEXANDER, Director
PEASE AUDITORIUM

YPSILANTI

1.
2.
3.

SASCHA JACOBINOFF, Vio linist, Oct. 17.
LOUIS GRAVEURE, Song R ecital, Nov. 5.
SOCIETE DES INRTT,-TRM'O R A Tu;+ ^

ON 1917.1918
4. CHRISTMAS MUSIC BY THE COLLEGE CtOIR De
200 n 'nd.r dk
a HLDLHASMBN - , TR, an
TB STjAT t PAS UIC byJ SB
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