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November 21, 1917 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-11-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

NI

11

EACH AGREEM

11

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11l Values

MUHL LUMUUI IN MI H
GOVERNMENT NEEDS PINE TIMB.
ER TO BUILD SHIPS FOR
ATLANTIC SERVICE

TERMS FOR RAISING OF EMBARGO
ON STEEL UNSATISFACTORY
TO JAPAN

HotI

AT

0 and $4.50

p

is & Co.

MAIN STREET

Cafeteria

NOW SERVING
TiE PUBLIC
Bess Is Paramount
FOR
EVERYTHING
ELECTRICAL
No Job too Small or too Large

Tokio, Nov. 20.-A lengthy state-
ment was issued today by the depart-,
ment of communications, announcing
that negotiations between this country
and the United States in regard to the
embargo on steel have been broken
off. Japan had been seeking to have
the embargo on steel raised to a cer-
tain extent in her favor, but the two
countries could not come to any satis-=
factiry agreement.
The negotiations began last sum-
Amer, when the United States put an
embargo on all steel shipments ex-
cept where the steel was to be used
for the Allies' benefit. Japan just,
,placed a large order in this country
and protested. America replied that
4f the Japan1ese would divert their
ships to trans-Atlantic service, they
could have free steel.
This demand would destroy Japan's
European trade, the statement de-
glares, while another alternative of-
fered was not adequate. This alter-
native was a proposal by the United
States to purchase outright whatever
ship tonnage the Japanese were wil-
ling to spare. The price offered was
$175 a ton. This is the price fixed
by the shipping board for American
tonnage.
Ships on the open market are sell-
ing for as high as $300 a ton, and it
was not a surprise to officials that
Japan considered' America's offer too
low. However, there was little doubt'
expressed that the two governments
would come to some agreement.
TO SAFEGUARD ALL
MUNITION WORKERS

New Orleans, Nov. 20. - The ship
timber needed by the United States
government at the present time must,
comne from the South, and the southern
pine association has started a. south-
wide educational and patriotic cam-
paign for the purpose of arousing the
southern lumber industries to their
z esponsibility.
A number of speakers have been ob-
tained who will visit every,town and
hamlet in the South and urge the
workers to put forth every effort to
furnish the enormous quantities need-
ed. They will be told that the fate of
the nation depends upon ships and that
ships depend upon southern lumber.
Circulars are being sent out with
the following inscription:
Mr. Lumberman: Our allies are
fighting our battles abroad. Unless
their soldiers are fed and supplied,
America will have to fight alone. They
not get supplies without ships and
cannot get supplies without the ships
and ships cannot be built without tim-
ber. It's up to the South.
Choice Wits From
College Exchanges
Los Angeles has been chosen as the
site of the Southern California Sum-
ier Session. This session will be car-
tried on in connection with the regular
summer school of the University of
California.
Seventy-four freshmen of the Uni-
versity of Washington will be excused
from freshman English. The entire
class took the examination in English
but only 74 men made a creditable
~showing.

Drug
IFor 30 Years the Best

>L
Try h
Fountain (
for your Candies--botl
We make a specialty of ligh
them at
The Fountaji
Corner of State a
FALL AND WIN']
We are well equipped to si
smartest styles of fabrics i
goods obtainable in a first c
establishment.

.
i '\
,:

I

WASHTENAW
ELECTRIC SHOP
"The Shop of Quality"
If it's not right we make it right
-PHONE 273 -
200 E. Washington 117 Pearl
Ann Arbor Ypsilanti
STOP AT
TUTTLES r
338 MAYN ARD
For Lunches and Sodas

Government Also Suggests Wages and
Hours Which Increase Effie-
ency

II

,.

1,934 are being taken at present.
The largest of the branch libraries is
the one in the Law building. This
room contains 37,621 books. The lib-
rary in the Natural Science building
ranks second with 13,758 volumes,
and the Engineering reading room con-
tains 8,573 books, while there are 2,141
in the Architectural branch.
ANN ARBOR OVERSUBSCRIBES
Y. M. C. A. WAR F [ND BY $474

Ann Arbor has oversubscribed by
it would tell $5 her quota of $14,285 in the city
tory when- it campaign for/Y. M. C. A. army camp
ir laundry. It funds which ended yesterday. A still
)tos aodrngreater oversubscription is looked fore
when complete-results of the campaign
DRY are turned in.
Washtenaw county's subscription is
o. Main St. $28,794 with most of the townships not
fully reported. Subscriptions thus far
,000, are: Ypsilanti, $7,5'71; Chelsea, $2,027;
ERIODICALS Saline, $1,257; Manchester, $1,404;
Milan, $1,125, and Dexter, $650.
mes are now A jubilee luncheon will be held
libraries of Thursday noon at the Y. M. 'C. A.
to figures be building to celebrate the success of the'
ry catalogue. campaign.
e i the gen-
o the library Read the Daily advertisements.
e than 15,000 They will lead you to the best of Ann
e number of Arbor's storts.-Adv.

Washington, Nov. 20.-Workers ir
arsenals and factories engaged in
government work must be surrounded
with the most perfect safeguards, ac-
cording to a general order recentlyd
made public by -the chief of ordnancet
to arsenal commanders and manufact-
urers.
Efficient operation of places where
government work is carried on, it is
claimed, demands that the workers
not only be protected with the ordin-
arj safeguards, but that their hours,
wes and working conditions be sat-
isfactorily adjusted. Consequently, a
list of suggestions for arsenal com-
manders and manufacturers has been
issued by the quartermaster general.
Among the suggestions as to hours
of labor are the following: That the
working day should not 1e longer than
10 hours for an adult workman; that
'he working period on Saturday should
not exceed five hours; and that one
day of rest is seven should be a uni-
versal and invariable rule. As to wage
standards, it is suggested that those'
already established in the industry
and in the locality should not be low-
ered. The minimum wage rates should
be made in proper relation to the
cost of living, and in fixing them, it
should be taken into consideration that
the prices of necessities of life have
shown great increases.
According to the standards suggest-
ed for the employment of minors, no
child under 14 years of age shall be
employed at any work under an'y :- n-
ditions; no child between the ages of
14 and 16 years shall be employed
more than eight hours daily or 48
hours a week, and night . work is
prohibited..
COIZENS REPEATS HIS $300
OFFER TO DEBATING LEAGUE
James Couzens of Detroit, sent word
to the oratorical board last night that

A class in public speaking has been
organized at the University of Wash-
Jngton for the benefit of Seattle busi-
ness men. The object of the course
is to study the best manner of pre-
senting business problems before com-
mittee meetings and business organ-
izations.
Campus rules at the University ,of
Ptah are being enforced by a vigil-
ance committee. This band is com-
posed of upper classmen. The fresh-
men have learned the traditions of the
university surprisingly well since
1any delinquents have received damp
and chilly punishment.
Utah rooters are not hogs. This
was the decision handed down by a
railroad company to the students of
the University of Utah, when a num-
ber of daring spirits endeavored to
rollow their football team in a hog
car.
Case School of Applied Science will
have a large service flag; The flag
will contain a star for every Case
man whonhas entered the service since
the United States declared war. Room
will be left for the addition of more
stars. The flag will be mounted on a
pole together with a large American
flag.
"Skin and Bones" is the name of
a girls' organization at the University
of Minnesota.,

OFFICERS' UNIFORMS

h

4

o o
'She11 fur

G. H. Wild Co
Leading Merchant Tailors

DEPENDABLE GLASSES
Omitting for a moment the superiGr methods
testing your eyt it .is essential that you wear
glasses.
ARNOLD'S GLASSES
are all that and more=-they are made of 'he b
fitted to you individually, so that they give you
comfort.
We recommend Shelltex Shur-ons, the glas
you lens breakages.
Better Glasses at less cost

it

Leave Copy
at
Students'
So py Str

Thirty-four students tried for the
prize offered to the.Poetry club of the
University of Chicago.
Girls of the University of Minnesota
will be given an opportunity to earn
,Money to pay their war subscriptionA
by setting up pins in the bowling al-
leys for morning gymnasium classes.
Agitation For Flag Rush Slowly Dying
With the coming of cold weather
,he smoldering fire of campus desire
for the annual flag rush appears to
have almost died out.
The feeble effort made by the fresh-
man engineers last week to fan it into
flame again seems to have been of no
avail. The Senate council, the su-
preme authority on the matter, does
not convene until the second week in
December, and the inclement weather

vhich usually reigns at that timev
dloubtless prevent a reversal oft
judgment handed down early int
fall because a contest could not
held uring the winter months.
held during the winter months.
SMALL TURNOUT OF WOMEN
FOR BASKETBALL PRACTI

will
the
the
be

EMIL H. ART
OPTOMETRIST-OPTI(
With Arnold and Co.. Jew
220 S. Main Street

[AN

1
6

kRTNER-Excellent op-
th good established bus-
partner to make small
Student could attend
draw salary and at close
ar could withdraw orig-
ent. Box W, Daily
buy second hand cloth-
pay fair price. Phone
210 E. Hoover Ave.
all furnished house or
J. E. Ludwig. Phone

FOR SENT
POR RENT-$35 for splendid rooming
house, Division corner Kingsley
Steam heat and all improvements.
Always rented for $66. Don't miss.
Herbst, Loans, Rentals, and Insur-
ance, Savings Bank Building.
LOST
LOST - Great Dane. Color golden
brindle. Please notify Psi Upsilon
House. Reward.
LOST-Bunch of keys. Finder please
call Geo. Boone. 1324-W.
MISCELLANEOUS
LOOK AT THIS-If you have any old
shoes, either send them down or let

he will repeat his $300 offer of last
year for the winning team in the cen-
tral debating league. The money will
be given as testimonials for the six
men on the team and will be in the na-
ture of scholarships.
The giving of testimonials to the
members of the winning, debating
teams has become traditional. The de-
bate will be held on Jan. 21, 1918.

"t 11

I

-our

CHRISTI1AS
VICTROLA
Is at Grinnell Btos. and you
can hav it on easy terms

Only 12 women reported for senior-
junior basketball practice in Barbour
gymnasium at 4:30 o'clock yesterday
afternoon.
The lack of numbers was partially
offset, however, by the character of the
practice. Marie Macauley, Beulah
Smith, Alice Burtless, an'd June -
Brooks, of last year's junior team,
and Phyllis. Egglestone and Elizabeth
McCormick of the sophomore team.
were present, as well as a number of
new players whom Miss Alice Evans Ha
considers as possible team material. op,
.-N.
There is always an opportunity to

GRINNELL BROS.

116 S. Main S.

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