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November 21, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-11-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

'1

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1917.

[

C

NOTICE

11

With the approval of the
President and the various
departments interested, all
freshman classes, scheduled
to meet at the time of the
freshman assembly today,
will be excused.
JOHN R. EFFINGER,
Dean.
All freshmen of the liter-
ary college are expected to
be present at the assembly
to te held at 10:30 o'clock
today in University hall.
Prof. John R. Brumm of the
rhetoric department will
speak on a subject of inter-
est to first year men.

I

f

fl

TO PARADE IN HONOR OF 78
v ARBOR MEN LEAVING FOR
BATTLE CREEK

,t

All classes in the University have
been dismissed from 8:00 to 9:30 o'-
clock Thursday morning by order of
President Hutchins to allow students
to participate in a parade to be held
din honor of 78 men who will leave
Ann Arbor for Camp Custer.
The city police department and city
officials will head the parade. The
University band will follow and be-
hind that will come the, ordnance
corps under Prof. J. A. Bursley and
the students of the University in or-
der of their classes: senior junior,
sophomore and freshman. Women
are also asked to march with their
classes. Following them will march Ot-
ito's band, the Boy Scouts, the high
school students, the Salvation Army
band, the Rotary club, and other city
organizations, in the order named. The
~selected men will bring up the close
of this parade.
Many Townspeople To March
Many townspeople will also march
and the school children of the city will
view the parade from different points
.Along the line of march. Efforts are
being made to secure bands from Yp-
silanti and Chelsea and the employees
of the Hoover Steel Ball company to
LMarch in the parade.
At the end of the line of march,
the students will line up at the sta-
tion so that the drafted men may pass
tn review. Without breaking their
(Continued on Page Six)
DEANS OF SUMMER
SCHOOLS TO MEET

U.S. WAR MISION
MEETS BRIISHRS
Army, Navy, Food Controllers, Ship-
ping Boards, Treasuries, and
War Trades Represented
ITALIANS PREVENT INVADERS
FROM PUSHING SOUTHWARy
Haig Starts Series of Attacks Against
Germans Near St. Quen-
tin
BULLETIN
London, Nov. 20. Premier .
Lloyd George In his address at
the allied war council told the
mission that the collapse of Russ..
Ia and the reverses to Italy "made
it even more imperative than be-
fore that the United States send as
many troops as possible acrvss the
Atlantic as early as possible."
(By Associated Press)
The American mission headed by
Colonel Edward M. House, which re-
cently arrived in England for the pur-
pose of discussing and co-ordinating
efforts to win the war, has had its in-
itial meeting with the British war
council.
Details of the conference, naturally-
have. been kept secret, but announce-
ment is made that little formality at
tended it, and that satisfactory pro-
gress marked the discussion. The far
reaching scope of the conference is in-
dicated -by the attendance upon the
meeting of joint representatives of the
army, navy, the food controllers, ship-
ping boards, the treasuries, and war7
trade boards.
Italians Repulse Germans Four Times
Between the Brenta and the Pave
rivers on the northern front of the
Italian theater, the Italians are ten-
aciously holding back the enemy and!
preventing his advance southward to
the Venetian plains, the gaining ofI
which would Wreck their entire liney
along the PiaVe river southward to theF
Adriatic sea. Four times attacks
against Monte Tomba, the chief posi-a
tion still blocking the way from the1
hilly country to the plain, have, been1
repulsed by the Italians.
Capture Prisoners and Guns
East of the Asiago plateau the
Italians are keeping up their offensive
against the invaders and have taken
more than 300 prisoners and a number1
of machine guns and several hundred
rifles. Along the Piave river the en-
emy has apparently made no further
effort to cross the stream, after the
serious losses he sustained in being
driven back Monday from the Zenson
bridge head.
Shifting his offensive to the south,
Field Marshall Haig has delivered ai
series of attacks against the Germans
in the region between St. Quentin and
the river Scarpe.
MEDICAL SOCIETY
ELECTS 5 SENIORS
Alpha Omega Alpha will Initiate New1
Members at Banquet _
December 1h
Five senior medical students have
been elected to Alpha Omega Alpha,
national honorary medical fraternity.t
They are: John T. Connell, Ann Ar-
bor; toy M. Greenthal, Detroit; Merit
.D. Haag, Wauseon, 0.; Lynne A.
Hoag, Ann Arbor; and Lester C.
Todd, Detroit.
The new members will be initiated
pt a banquet to be given on Dec. 13, at

the Union. This will also mark the
tenth anniversary of the chapter at:
Michigan.
Arrest Broker for Liberty Loan Fraud
New York, Nov. 20.-Elmer Dwig-
gins, New York bond broker, arrested
in Montgomery, Ala., last week charg-
ed with using the mails to defraud in
the sale of Liberty bonds. was held inc
$50,000 bail here yesterday.t

30

Sesu
Ye

..
'\\_

THE PENDULUM .-MUST SWING

17

shi
fiver

ACK!

. _

RIETY TO BE FEA TUE " AR, NOTHING BUT
SOf 1911 BAND FE TIU OTES FRENCH, MIN
MUSIC, ORIGINAL SONGS AND CHAMBER OF DEPUTIES

~I siy

GIVE

SKETCHES, AND OPERA ON
THE PROGRAM
Lulling melodies from Hawaii,
where the dark-eyed maidens dance
gracefully to the accompaniment of
,the ukelele and steel guitar, will soothe
the senses of those who attend the an-
nual Band Festival to be given at
8:30 o'clock tomorrow evening in Hill
auditorium. The Hawaiian instru-
mental pieces, which will be rendered
by the Wailana Four, overflow with
the spirit of the Pacific isles.
Jazz Music and Songs
In direct contrast to the soothing
songs from the South Seas, comes- a
"Joyful Jumble of Jazz," produced by
Cottington's Mean Music Makers.
More variety will again be heard when
Carlos A. Zanelli, '18E, appears in
operatic selections.
L. B. Emmerman, '18L, and Seymour
Simons, '17E, will entertain from be-
hind the footlights in a number of
songs written by Simons especially
for the Band Festival. The martial
spirit will shine forth in "Women of
Michigan," which is expected to be the
hit of the act. The other two songs
which Simons has composed are "Still
We Call Them Babies Today" and "I
Know a Girl," both of which are said
to be very catchy.
Vaudeville Specialties
Sketches from Dixie, the land of
cotton and watermelons, will be given
by the Darktown Four-tette. F. D.
Reider, '18, & Co. will be seen in "Ac-
tion." The band, for whose benefit
the Festival is given, will render a
few special numbers.
The entire program is one of varie-
ty, and has been planned with great
care. The predictions are that it is
going to be the snappiest affair of its
kind that has ever been given on the
campus. The talent which will take
part is high class, and practically
all of the starshave had previous -ex-
perience in dramatics at the Univer-
sity.
Tickets are now on sale, and may
be obtained from any committeeman.
Robbers Use Pepper to Get Pay Roll
Cleveland, Nov. 20.- Hurling red
pepper into the eyes of the factory
superintendent guarding the pay roll
of the Van Dorn Iron Work company,
three bandits escaped with $10,000.

VOTE OF CONFIDENCE
418 TO 64

I

Paris, Nov. 20.-"War, nothing but
war," concluded Premier Clemenceau
this afternoon in a declartion, to the
chamber of deputies, decided upon by
the new cabinet.
"We have accepted places in the
government in order to conduct the

war with redoubled effort for theb
ter application of all our energi
the declaration began. "We come

be

'

fore you with the sole idea of an
tegral war.
"The single, simple duty is- to sts
by the soldier-rive, suffer and fil
with him; renounce everything thai
not of the fatherland.
"Neither personal consideration n

I-

political ardor turned us from our copal Gi
duty or lead us to go beyond it. ed its pr
Too many criminal attempts have al- The ca:
ready resulted on our battle front in Universi
the shedding of a superabundance of Plans
French blood. Weakness would be returns
complicity. We shall be without weak- game, S
ness as without, violence. All the ac- auditori
cused before court martial-that is our will be
policy. No more pacifist campaigns, go to tb
no more German intrigues; neither arrange
treason nor semi-treason. War, noth- music a
ing but war!" feature.
The chamber of deputies this vening leased f
gave a vote of confidence to Dr.
Clemenceau 418 to 65. PROF.

es from 12 Universities Will
at Ann Arbor Convention
Friday and Saturday

Deans of the summer session from
and 12 universities besides Michigan- will
the be present at their first convention to,
forc- be held here Friday and Saturday.
1 af- The plan of the convention was
club formulated by Dean E. H. Kraus, who
iving in conjunction with other deans made
con- the convention possible. Some of the
hese topics that will be discussed are:
"Registration in 1916 as compared
with 1917"; "What courses should be
ieine eliminated from the 1918 summer ses-
'21, sions?"; "The status of graduates in
ago summer session," and "Best ways of
the obtaining publicity," -
year The representatives who will be in
dical Ann Arbor are: A. H. Rice, Boston
that university; R. D. Salisbury, Chicago
ctors university; J. P. Egbert, Columbia; G.
R. Bristol, Cornell; R, C. Babcock, Ill-
stem inois; W. D. -Howell, Indiana; F. G.
rhich Kelly, Kansas.; L. P. Coffman, Min-
an is nesota; C. S. Marsh, Northwestern; J.
man, E. Lough, New York; M. E. Smith,
dom- Syracuse; S. H. Goodnight, Wisconsin.
alled Dean E. H.Kraus will represent Mich-
they igan.
rain- Several schools who were asked to
rn to send representatives have not yet
se in answered, but it is expected that some
schools will send their directors, in-
creasing the number to perhaps 15 or
Goal more. The meetings will be held Fri-
ional day morning, afternoon, and evening, I
s an-, and Saturday morning in Alumni+

ARCHON INITIATES
11 JUNIOR LAV
Junior Law Honorary Society Ho
Initiation Followed by
Banquet
Eleven initiates were 'taken i
Archon, junior law honorary socie
yesterday evening. The new men'
as follows: Emil Annebel, Rollin
Winslow, John C. Roberts, Oscar
Lambert, Abraham J. Gornetz
George L. Field, Ronald A. But
Donald F. Geddes, Harold B. Co'y
Eugene D. Kirby, and Don T. McKc
A banquet was held at the Un
immediately following the initiati
Professor R. W. Aigler was the I
ulty speaker, while speeches were a
given by J. E. Chenot, '19L, O. P. La
bert, '19L, and J. H. CarWright,
18L.

MISS-ANNA PYOTT'
National Y.W.C.A Secretary will Speak on
"'War Work for Women"

Graveure To Appear In
Louis Graveure, the br
gian baritone, will appear
recital at 8 o'clock Thurso
in Pease auditorium, Yps
Tickets for the Norm
course may be secured fro:
erick Alexander at the I

C..J

be tendered the vis-

Wed. Evening, - Nov. 21st'

8:00 O'clock
wwTU'rtI

the Univ

~ I

up]

RIAN.C

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