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November 18, 1917 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-11-18

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l) YU.

DUTY YET BY SUBSCRIBING

TO THE

I

11.

THE WEATHER
FAIR AND COLDER

r Sic ip

til

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIR
SERVICE

I

TODAY

1...r... .. I

VOL. XVIII. No. 42.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIq N, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 1917.

PRICE THREE C

-R

t _"

WEDNESDAY NIGHT SET AS LIMIT
TO ABTIN MICHIGAN'S $25-000
QUOTA FOR FREDHPWAR FUND

LATE REPORTS LAST NIGHT
BRING SUBSCRIPTIONS
TO $17,235
UNIVERSITY WOMEN
$100 AHEAD OF MEN
Plans for Drive for Final $8,000 to be
Formulated This Morn-
ing
Owing to the slow progress of sub-
scriptions to the Student Friendship
war fund, the committees in charge
have decided to continue the campaign
to Wednesday night in hopes that the
full quota of $25,000 may be reached.
Reports late last night at Lane
hail, headquarters for the drive, stat-
ed that but $17,235 had been raised.
The campaign should have closed Sat-
urday night.
Women in the University are still
$100 ahead of the men in subscrip-
tions. Eight hundred and thirty men
have subscribed to the fund, with a
total return of $5,355.50, while 660
women subscribers contributed $5,-
435.19. Six girls. in one team ob-
tained $453 in pledges,
Proportion on Wrong Side
"This proportion is entirely on the
wrong side of the house," said Mr. N.
C. Fetter, secretary of the campaign."
I am surprised that the men are allow-
ing the women to defeat them in this
cause."
"Should the pace set by the faculty
of the engineering college be maintain-
ed in all other colleges of the Univer-
sity, the total faculty subscription
would amount to $18,000; should the
pledges of the women students be
proportionate to the record made by
Martha Cook dormitory, the girls would
subscribe a total of $10,694; should
the men equal the average of the first
168 men subscribers, they would
pledge a total of $30,000, which would
make a grand total of $58,594 for the
University," estimated Mr. Glenn Hers
man, financial secretary of the Stu-
dents Christian association.
Some High Contributions
Ane fraternity has averaged $12.11
per man. The largest gift from the
faculty is $200, the highest men stu-
dent's contribution, $125, while the
largest donation from the women stu-
dents was $100.
Plans for the drive to obtain the
$8,000 remaining to complete the Un-
iversity's quota, will be formulated at
a meeting of the executive committee
to be held at 9 o'clock this morning
at Lane hall. All solicitors and cam-
paigners will meet in Lane hall at
$:30 o'clock tonight,
Members of the executive commit-
tee believe that the entire $25,000 can
be obtained within a few days.
Confident Amount Will be Raised
"We will not believe that the Uni-
versity will allow her pledge to the
other colleges in Michigan to be brok-
en. The word of the University when1
. she agreed to raise this money is
good," declared one committee mem-
ber. "I feel confident that we will
reach our quota if the students will
respond to this worthy enterprise."
ANTHRACITE MINERS MAY GET
15 TO 44 PER CENT INCREASE
Operators Agree to New Scale on Con-
dition That Advances Are
Absorbed
Washington, Nov, 17.-Wage increas-
es ranging from 15 to 44 per cent
for Pennsylvania anthracite miners
were agreed to by the operators here
today, on condition that the advances
are absorbed in the higher coal prices.
As soon as they had signed their
new contract, the operators called on

Fuel Administrator Garfield and ask-
ed that anthracite prices be raised to

* * * * * * * * * * * *
* *
* PROGRESS OF STUDENTS' *
* FRIENDSHIP WAR FUND *
* __ _*

Turn Out And Give A Michigan
Team A I eal riehigan Welcome
Michigan's Varsity football team returns to' Ann Arbor this after-
noon at 2:29 o'clock
The Varsity is not coming home victorious but it is a Michigan tean..
that disembarks at the Michigan Central depot. It is a team which
represented Michigan on Franklin field and it is a team which should
be met.
A mere handful compared to the available numbers, cheered the
team off. The complaint was that classes interfered. There are no
classes today. The band will be on hand and there will be an op-,
portunity for every student to prove himself or herself loyal to Mich-
igan.
At 2:29 o'clock at the Michigan Central depot.

Michigan's quota in the
fund...............$
Yesterday's total contri-
bution...........
Friday's total..... .
Total Women's subscrip-
tions to date.........
Average Women's con-
tribution .............
Total men's contribu-
butions to date.......
Average contribution
man .................
Faculty total to date....
Women's total yester-
day ................
Men's subscription yes-
terday............
Contributions not clas-
sified ...............
University total to date. $

WOLVERINES FALL BEFORE STRONG
PENNSYLVANIA ELEVEN 18 TO GQ!
_ FIERCE TILT- ON f fRN lI

*
X25,000.00 *
*
6,911.19 *
10,324.50
5,435.19 *
*
8.25 *
*
5,355.50 *
*
6.70 *
4,840.00 *
*
1,806.69 *
*
2,245.50 *
,*
1,605.00 *
17,235.69 *
*

*

.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * *
No New Loan In
January - Adoo
Secretary of Treasury Lauds Amer-
!can Soldiers for Subscriptions
to Second Loan
Washingtoni, D. C., Nov. 17.-Sec-
retary McAdoo has issued a statement
in which he denies the rumor preval-
ent that there is to be another sale of
Liberty bonds in January. Another
national loan in so short a time is
made unnecessary by the $1,617,532,-
300 oversubscription to the second
loan, 5,400,000 more persons having
subscribed to this loan than to the first
one,
Secretary McAdoo highly commend-
ed the showing made by the American
people, especially the men in service,
in this campaign. "These gallant men."
he said, "are not only giving their
lives and their services to their coun-
try, but are lending their money as
well to strengthen the government in
this great war for America's rights and
wor'; democracy." ,.
ELEVEN NEW MEMBERS TAKEN
INTO RANKS OF COMEDY CLUB
The Comedy club initiated eleven
new members last night at the Pack-
ard academy. An original stunt by"
the initiates was followed by dancing.
The new members, admitted last
spring and this fall are: Naomi S.
Bradley, '20; Mary E. Overman, '19-;
Ferdinand C. Bell, '19; Harry P. Ben-
nett, '19; Edward H. Haan, '18; Wini-
fer, '18; Mabel E. Bannister, '19; Har-
fer, '18; Mabel E. aBnnister, '19; Har-
riet P. Woodworth, '20; Gilbert R."
Byrne, '19, and Sovesky, '19.
The chaperons were Prof. John
R. Brumm and Mrs. Brumm and Prof.'
Louis A. Strauss and Mrs. Strauss.
JOURNALISM STUDENTS VISIT
NEW DETROIT NEWS BUILDING
About 30 students and others inter-
ested in journalism from the Univer-
sity of Michigan were shown through
the new Detroit News plant by Mr.
Lee White, '10, and Mr. Lee Smits yes-
terday afternoon. The course of a
news story was followed as nearly as
possible by the visitors in their trip.
The establishment is rated as one of
the most modern in the country and
many expressions of admiration were'
heard regarding the efficient methods
and equipment used.

More than 50 foreign students at-
tended the first meeting of the Cos-
mopolitan club this year held at Lane
hall Friday night. Abraham Elkind,
'19E, acted as chairman of the meet-
ing and told of his experiences in Sy-
racuse this summer with the Cosmo-
politan club there. -
A short talk was given by Prof. J.
Raleigh Nelson in which he describ-
ed the formation of the club at Michi-
gan and its progress up to the present
time. H. Gilbert King, grad., recount-
ed some of the events of last year and
told of the activities that the club in-
tended to participate in this semester.
British Consolidate Gais
London, Nov. 17.-"During the day,"
says the official report from British
headquarters in Flanders, "the ground
captured by us last night north and
northwest of Passchendaele has been
consolidated. The hostile artillery has
again shown considerable activity near
Ypres.
Highland troops carried out a suc-
cessful raid this morning south of the
Scarpe river.
Librarian Sends Camp Greene Books
Librarian Bishop has shipped a case
of books to the army library of Camp
Greene, Charlotte, N. C., upon the re-
quest of Frances Goodrich, former
assistant librarian at the University
library. The request for books came
as a result of Mr. Goodrich finding no
books at the camp.
Famous Sculptor Seriously Ill
Paris, Nov. 17.-Auguste Rodin, the
famous sculptor, is seriously ill. His
physician, Dr. Stephen Chauvet, has is-
sued the following bulletin;
"Congestion of the lungs has caused.
great weakness. The patient's condi-!
tion is grave."

U, So TO INESTIGATE
NEEDS Of INDUSTRIESi
COAL AND RAIL TRANSPORTATION
TO BE DENIED AS WAR
MEASURE
Washington, Nov. 17.--Arbitrary el-
imination of industries, which are re-
garded as non-essential, in order to
save coal and rail transportation, will
be undertaken by the government only
after 'every business threatened has
been given a full hearing.
Recommendations Answered
This was made clear today by Rob-
ert Lovett, director of priority trans-
portation, and Fuel Administrator Gar-
field, in statements replying to the re
commendation of the railroad war
board that coal and transportation be
denied immediately to more than 500
commodities,
Mr. Lovett declared that he con-
templated no early action designed to
cut off transportation to any industry.
50 FOREIGN STUIDENTS ATTENID
COSMOPOLITAN CL U B IEETING4

ITALIA9NS SUCCESSFUL
IN MINTAINING LINE
AMERICAN CASUALTIES GROW;
KERENSKY REPORTED
IN FLIGHT
(By Associated Press)
Undated war story, Nov. 17.-Italy's
armies are making an heroic and, so
far, successful stand against the Aus-
tro-German masses thrown against
them along the Piave river, and in
the mountainous region from the
river, westward to the edge of the
Trentino district. The river line has
not been breached at any point, while
the thrust of the Austrians south-
ward from the hills is making small
progress.
Position Maintained
It is now more than a week since
the Italians retreating from the Tag-
liamento crossed the west bank of the
Piave and took up their defensive po-
sition. The German command lost
no time in attempting to force a pas-
sage of the river. The Italian ress-
tance, however, seems to be growing
stronger rather than otherwise. The
latest Austro-German attempts to
gain a hold on the westerly side of
the Piave were not only frustrated,
but the enemy columns were badly cut
up and nearly 1,000 Teutons taken
prisoners.
Line Yields Slightly
The Italian line has yielded slightly
in the hills east of Brenta, where the
capture of Monte Prassolan by Aus-
tro-Hungarian troops is announced by
Berlin. No further advances are claim-
ed.
Military operations in the other war
theaters were on a small scale. The
most important move was made in
Flanders by the British, who pushed
further north on the Goaberg spur,
capturing a strongly fortified redoubt
known as Vocation farm.
In Palestine the British forces,
which recently had made so specta-
cular an advance up the Mediterran-
ean coast to the neighborhood of Jaffa,
are still moving forward but appar-
ently are feeling their way with cau-
tion.
Americans Active
On the French front held by the
American troops, there has been in-
creased activity on the part of the ar-
tillery, and there have been additions
to the American casualty lists, some
of which occurred when a German
shell hit an American gun. The Amer-
ican batteries have been energetic in
their reply..
Naval Engagement
On the naval side of the war, there
is an interesting development in the
North Sea where British forces in
selgoland bight encountered German
cruisers Saturday morning. The Brit-
ish admiralty reported that the Ger-
mans made off at high speed with
British vessels in pursuit.
Kerensky In Flight
From Russia late dispatches report
Premier Kerensky in flight, his where-
abouts being unknown in Petrograd.

* '* * * * * * * * * * * *
* FOOTBALL SCORES *
* --- . *
* STATE
* University of Detroit 35; Kalam- *
* azoo Normal 6.
* Albion 10; Olivet 6. *
* Alma 25; Kalamazoo college 14. *
WEST *
* Notre Dame 23; M A..C. 0. *
* Ohio State 13; Illinois 0.*
* l innesota 33; Chicago 0. *
* Northwestern 25; Iowa 13. *
* Nebraska 13; Kansas 3. *
* Indiana 35; DePauw 0.
* Purdue 2; Wabash 0. *
* Ca.se 14; Mount Union 0. *
* EAST *
* Syracuse 27; Colgate 0. *
* Tufts 27; Dartmouth 0. *
* Fordham 27; Cornell 6. *
* Army 50; Lebanon Valley 0. *
* Navy 80; Villa Nova 3. *
* Pittsburg 27; Carnegie Tech 0. *
* SOUTH *
Georgia Technical Institute 98; *
* Carlisle Indians 0. *
* * * * * * * * * * * * * *
Sedgwick Winner
of Five Nile Run
Lowers Eddie Carroll's Old Record for
Michigan Course by Five
Seconds
Captain Sedgwick came home ahead
of the field in the annual cross coun-'
try run over Michigan's five-mile
course Saturday morning, covering the
distance in 27 minutes and 29 seconds,1
five seconds better than the former
record held by Eddie Carroll, captain
of the track team last year.s
Maynard finished a close second to
the team Jeader, coming in eight sec-
onds behind Sedgwick, three seconds
slower than Carroll's old record. Don-1
nelly was third; Stoll, fourth; Fuess,
fifth; Meehan, sixth; and Phelps, last.
Sedgwick will have his name inscribed
on the trophy in Waterman gymnas-
ium, while he with Maynard and Don-1
nelly will receive cups awarded to thei
first three men to cross the finish lin-I
every year. These three men and
Stoll and Fuess will be given crossI
country sweaters.1
Schimmel won the freshman race of
three miles, with Houghton, Donovan,
Carpenter, and Stewart finishing be-
hind him. These five men receive
freshman cross country sweaters.i
Schimmel's time of 18 minutes, 50 sec-
onds was slow, but he was not pressedi
at any point.I
BLACKMAILER OF EDSEL FORD
SENT TO PRISON AND FINED
Detroit, Nov. 17.-Jacob Yellin was1
sentenced to five years imprisonment
in Leavenworth federal penitentiary
and fined $1,000 by United States Dis-
trict Judge Tuttle today, when a fed-
eral jury found him guilty of sending
an extortion letter to Edsel Ford. TheI
full penalty was imposed.
When arraigned for sentence, Yellin1
denied sending a typewritten letteri
to Mr. Ford Nov. 1, demanding pay-i
ment of $10,000, under threat of kil-
ling Mr. Ford's infant son, Henry
Ford II..
CADETS AND W7LEN TAKE PARTI
IN PETROGRAD STREET FIGHTS
Washington, Nov. 17.-Belated dis-
patches from Ambassador Francis,
reaching the state department today,l
told of fighting in the streets of Petro-
grad in which students of the mili-i
tary academy and battalions of women
cadets and women were slaughtered"

by Bolsheviki troops.I
The latest dispatch was dated Nov-f
ember 13, last Tuesday.
Plan To Sell War Savings Stamps
Washington, Nov. 17.-Plans for
placing war saving stamps on sale in
at least a million establishments for
the campaign opening Dec. 3, were
made today by treasury officials and
the war savings committee. Schools,
grocery stores, cigar stands, and re-
tail stores will not be required tobuy
the stamps, but may obtain them on
consignment for sale.

1 YOST MEN BEATEN DECISIVE
. ItY COACH FOLWELL'SAG-
GREGATION
BERRY PROVES STAR
OF ANNUAL CONTE
Michigan Players Fight Hard
Without Success Against Power
fat Eastert Team.-
t:
Philadelphia, Pa., Nov. 17.-A yo
by the name of Berry, who plays fu
back for Pennsylvania's football te
lived up to his advance notice .t
afternoon and almost single-han
and alone defeated Michigan 16 ti
on Franklin field.
Berry was responsible for the
points which defeated the Wolveri:
last year and his total points scor
equalled his 1916 record. His a
around playing was primarily resp
sible for the blasting of Michiga
championship hopes.
Berry ran around the ends, ploug
through center, smashed off ta
blocked, tackled, punted from one e
of the field to the other and bo
three drop kicks between the i
rights, one of them from a diffi
angle, when the result was still
doubt. Outside of this, Penn's fulb
and star was loafing throughout .1
battle.
Michigan Fights Hard
Michigan did not go down with
a fight. Even when the afternc
shadows showed the nearness of I
end of the game, the Wolverines we
still battling, struggling on, hoping
the face of almost unsurpassable o
for the break which might mean v
tory.
Three times Penn secured the Jo
within Micigan's ten-yard line a
as many times Michigan's defense hu
ed back the powerful rushes 'of t
Penn backfield. Even the redou
able Berry found a stone wall wh
he tried for a touchdown, while Lg
and Bell had no greater success
dodging around the ends,
Had it not been for a .blocked Pu,
which Cleary fell on behind the .g<
line, Michigan would not have yie
ed a single touchdown to the fighti
Penn eleven. Berry's aerial atta
scored enough points to win as it w
but it was a bad break which enab]
Cleary to roll up his six points.
Breaks Against Wolverines
Unquestionably the breaks 'we
against Michigan from the start.
though, aside from the first few mo
ents of play, Michigan was unable
make a first down, it was a piece of m
fortune which turned the tide irresst
ly in Penn's favor. Genebach fumbJ
a punt, something which he doesn't
very often, and a Penn player rec
ered on Michigan's ten-yard line.
few plays later Berry scored the .fr
three of his 10 points and Michig
was started on the road to de'feat.
The defense that Michigan present
in the shadow of the goal posts
just what Penn was displayi
throughout the entire length of t
field. Wieman, Cohn, and Hanish w
able to gain nearly every time th
took the ball, but Cohn's eight-ya
run off tackle was the' longest g
the backfield was able to make
any time, while for the most part t
men had to be content with a one
two-yard advance.
The worst thing that could possil
have happened to Michigan occur
when the scrappy Weston become i
anxious to put Strauss out of the p1
and started a fist fight with him. B
were disqualified. Penn lost her si
line plunger, but Michigan lost her
recting force and 75 per cent of 1
fighting spirit.
Michigan Meets Better Team-.
It was a good team which Michig

put on the field this afternoon. T
eleven which trounced Nebraska a
walloped Cornell showed signs of re
class. But Penn proved to be just
(Continued on Page Three)
Aviator's Home Not In Ann Arbo
The Daily takes this opportunity
correct an error made in yesterda
issue. Phelpe Collins's residence w
mistakenly given as AnnA ro
whereas his home is in Alpena. C
lins is the American aviator who
thrilling fight with a German airpla
was the substance of a story.

meet t
the re
estima
would
thraci
about
nually
Fue
not sa

he increase. Mr. Garfield took Drafted Men To Receive Send-off
Iquest under advisement. It is A large parade and send-off will
ted that the wage increase be given the 78 men who will leave
add about 45 cents a ton to an- Ann Arbor Thursday, Nov. 25, for se-
te prices, and give the miners lective army service at Camp Custer.
$40,000,000 additional pay an- Students of the University and high
. .school are expected to take part in
l administration officials would the parade which will be similar to
y tonight how Mr. Garfield views the demonstration in honor of the
-mand for higher prices. When first contingent that left this city for
cers and miners of bituminous Camp Custer in September.
ixed a new wage scale recently, Details of the parade are now being
reased bituminous prices. worked out.

WESLEYAN GUILD LECTURE
HARRIS F. RALL
OF EVANSTON, ILL.
, .ubject:a
tFaith and War".

TO-NIGHT
7:30

METHODIST CHURCH

TO-NIGHT
7:30

r

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