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October 04, 1917 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-10-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Frcshmcn!
You know what Hart
Schaffner & Marx clothes
are for they are sold in your
town. You know that the
styles 'are the kind fellows
wear who always look right,
and that the cloth is all wool

wears better than other

kinds.

Come down town for

clothes for you can't get
them anywhere else in Ann
Arbor. We have complete
lines of
Varsity Fifty-Five
Suits

CONFEDERATE IETERAIS
HOME CUTS MEALS
HIGH COST OF LIVING REDUCES
MENU CARD FOR LOUISVILLE
OLD SOLDIERS
Louisville, Ky., Oct. 3.-High cost of
Living, the national bogey has pre-
pented a curious situation at the Ken-
tucky Confederate Home at Peewee
Valley about fifteen miles from here,
where the trustees of the institution
have reduced the number of meals for
the 200 old soldiers from three ta two.
daily.
What is regarded as a fair sample
of menus provided coffee, tea or milk,
hot biscuits and butter, hominy and
oatmeal, and molasses for breakfast.
For dinner the veterans were given
veal and mutton, string beans, sliced
tomatoes, stewed peaches, corn bread,
coffee and milk. Breakfast is served
about an hour later than under the
three-meals-a-day plan and dinner
about an hour earlier.
"Dg ffty per cent of the people of
thia state who pay taxes to support
the Confederate home fare any bet-
ter day by day than these aged sol-
diers?" a statement from the trustees
asks. "The poll of the board of trus-
tees shows that two-thirds of them
only eat two meals daily. Men whose
average age is 77 do not need same
amount of food as men that labor."
Appended to the statement is a cer-
tification by the medical board of the
home that the food supplied the (d
soldiers is healthful and abundant,
and that no attempt is made to limit
the supplies furnisheA to invalid sol-
diers in the itmtary.
The t %% ot supported by an appro-_
prlatin from the state of $3,500
Monthly. This appropriation made at
the last session of the General Assem-
bly in 1916 was deemed ample to meet
all demands. The greatly increased
,cost of all supplies has made It in-
adequate.
Diminution, bf the number of meals
aroused a. storm of protests, especial-.
ly from Confederate veterans in all
parts of tnw state.
Af detailing the amount of mon-
ey yaylabl. under the state's appro-
priation, the statement submits a ta-
ble showing the difference in the cost
of supplies now and at the time of
,the appropriation waa made. There
has been, 6,eerding to the table, an
ava increase in cost on all the.
articles used at the home of 54 per
cent.

The statement calls attention to the
fact that expenditures on behalf of
the home can only be paid after the
bills have been certified by the state
auditor to the state treasurer and
that this certification will be refused
if the monthly appropriation is ex-
ceeded..
The 'statement says that with prices
of supplies at their present level the
home would face a deficit of $8,000 at
the end of the year if the economies
instituted had not been adopted. It
then adds, "As Confederate soldiers
and citizens of integrity we cannot
afford to 'bilk' the merchants of
Louisville out of $8,000 worth of sup-
plies even for the Confederate home."
In view of this situation the board
says it was confronted with a choice
of two courses: To close the home
and let the inmates return, to the
points from which they came, or to so
economize that the home could be
continued in operation until the Gen-
eral Assembly meets again early in
1918, when a larger appropriation
probably could be obtained.

and

Six Hundred
Overcoats

Spicy)I News From
OtherColleges
Syracuse will play again with the
eleven from the 47th regiment next'
Saturday. The game scheduled for
that date with Alfred college has been
cancelled because that institution is
without a coach.
An old custom of singing on the
steps of Liberal Arts hall at Syracuse
is being revived this year. Every ev-
ening the men from different classes
gather to sing and give the class yell.
The second annual "A" day of the
University of Arizona was carried out
last Saturday when the entire college
turned out to whitewash the mam-
moth masonry "A" which stands 'on
the side of Sentinel Peak near Tuc-
son. At night its outlines were illum-
inated.

- - -

i
1
1
1
i
i

No other store in Ann Arbor
has as many patterns and
styles to choose from. Every-

new.

Our tes, Alan, hats and
the like are just as good as
our clothing.
Reule-Conlin-
Fiegel Co.
The 64 store at the south-
east corner Main and Wash-
ington Streets-downtown.

lit

Ijeadquarters for
Laboratory Coats
Regulation styles made up in durable olive
colored covert cloth

Price

$1.50

WAITERS' COATS AND APRONS

Grinnell college recently received an
gift consisting of a 480 acre farm and
,a lot The property is estimated to
have a value of $125,000.1
Military courses at Harvard haveF
an, enrollment numbering 750 and.
three battalions are assured instead
of two as was first planned.
There are 400 men in the battalions
,at Dartmouth this year.
Registration at Brown showed a de-
crease of thirty-seven per cent of stu-
dents enrolled.
War times increase interest in mu-
sic. Prof. W. E. Hays, head of the
department of music at the State Un-
iversity of Iowa is responsible for
this statement. The musical clubs at
Iowa have a larger number of candi-
dates to pick from this year than ever
before.
The letter system of grading will
take the place of the old1 1, I1, and
III" formerly used at the University
of Kansas.
History professors at Kansas are
enjoying a remarkable increase :in
enrollment in their courses because
of the war and the general interest in
political affairs.
Girls at the University of Illinois
are making big efforts to secure
sweets and smokes to send to the
men driving ambulances in France.
THREE GRADUATES FORM NEW
GRAND RAPIDS PARTNERSHIP
Three Michigan men, Albert R. Dil-
ley, '12, H. Dale Souter, '13, and Abl
ner D. Dilley, '13, have announced the
formation of the law firm of Dilley,
Souter and Dilley at 7343/ 737 Mich-
gan Trust building, Grand Rapids,
and will conduct a general law prac-
tice.
Feeding Fish by Electricity
Topeka, Kan., Oct. 3.-Electric
lights are to be installed at the state
fish hatchery to attract bugs at night,
which are to be made use of as food
for the fish.
Under a plan worked out by W. G.
Tegemier, state fish and game war-
den, the electric lights will. be in-
stalled at the hatchery at once. The
plan, worked out. by Mr. Tegemier
while he was on the northern lakes
this summer, is expected to yield suf-
ficient food for the fish to more than
pay for the installation of the lights.
While at the lakes, he notieed lights
suspended over the water for the con-
venience of fishermen and boatmen.
Fish came under the lights waiting
for the bugs attracted by the illum-
ination.

FIFTY MEN PPLY FOR
FORHSTRSCOURSE
SEND STUDENTS TO ARSENALS
AFTER COMPLETION OF
WORK HERE
More than 50 applicants have al-
ready been received by Prof. J. A.
Bursley for admittance to the fourth
Army Stores methods course which is
to be started on Nov. 3.
At the present time there are 109
students taking the third course
which will be completed Oct. 22. At
the completion of the course in the
Ordnance or Quartermastersi depart-
ments the men will be assigned to ac-
tive service in one of the government
arsenals. The majority 'of the stu-
dents will be sent to the Rock Island
arsenal.
The courses last for a period of six
weeks in the University, and after a
short furlough, the men take an addi-
tional training of five weeks before
being sent to a government canton-
ment. Several weeks of cantonment
life will fit the men for service in
France.
Consists of "Army Regulations"
The courses consist of "Army Reg-
ulations" dealing with ordnance and
quartermasters' departments, army
organization, army paper work, in-
dustrial stores, French, accounting,
the handling, storing of supplies, ord-
nance supplies and equipment and
quartermasters' supplies. The men
drill two hours each day.
On Friday of each week the two
classes visit industrial plants on in-
spection tours in Detroit; A new man-
ufacturing plant is inspected each
week.
The courses are given under the
instruction branch of the supply di-
vision of the Ordnance Corps. Sim-
ilar courses are being given in Chi-
cago University, University of Wis-
consin, University of Pennsylvania,
Penn. State University, and Dart-
mouth college.
Miss Frances Caspari, teacher of
Voice Culture, Term beginning Oct. 2.
Studio, Room 12, Corwell Bldg., Cr.
Huron and Fourth Ave. Phone 216-M.
--Adv.
PHONE 1
Wh

If you w
in Ann
send us
O u r filte
COnVinC.(
Buy a Ca
H. G. PRETTMAN
-r.-

Socialist Head Chum of Late King the late King Edward. In perso
London, Oct. 3.-H. M. Hyndman, appearance he bears a striking
head of the Socialist Labor party in semblance to the American I
England, who has just addressed a Longfellow. Mr. Hyndman has ti
stirring appeal to the socialists of elled widely, especially in Amer
Russia, is a Cambridge graduate, and and Germany. His pet aversions
was a classmate and close friend of golf and whiskey.
Loose-Leaf

We are making special close-out prices on Students'
Books. We can furnish these books in all Binding.

NOTE BOOKS

Made of strong white duck with
bibs. Priced
35c and $1.

or without
50

(Mden's Shop-Left)

:hat's Lunch Room"

RAPID SERVICE IN THE MORNING
BEFORE CLASSES

BEST OF FOOD AND COFFEE
CLEANLY SERVED

.

WE ARE OPEN UNTIL 2 A. M.

Phone 699-R

Patronize Our Advertisers.--Adv.

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