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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 11, 1917 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-11-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

kMY SHIRTS
Special Values

HUNS SPEIN MILLIONS.
TO PREICE SWISS
ACQUIRE NUMBER OF PAPERS
FOR USE OF PRO-A
PAGANDA
Berne, Nov. 19.-Probably at no time
since the war began has German pro-
paganda been more aggressively ac-
tive in Switzerland than at present.
Those who are following the German

STORY OF SEEADLER s
RAID TOLD BY CAPTAIN

Calkins Drug 324
Company 113-.

OFFICER
OF

DESCRIBES
SCHOONERR
SLADE

CAPTURE
C.

Football Pictures

AT

Washington, Nov. 10.-The full
story of the cruise of the German com-
merce raider Seadler has been ob-

$3.00 and $4.50

p

Wadhams & Co.

STATE STREET

MAIN STREET

--

NMI

A HAND BUILT
PRODUCT OF
PRIDE

I.

CURTIS
TIRES

FOR
EVERYTHING
ELECTRICAL
No Job too Small or too Large
WASHTENAW
ELECTRIC SHOP
"The Shop of Quality"
If it's not right we make it right
-PHONE 273 -

Adjustment
miles

Basis is 6,000
of service

L

VULCANIZED
PRODUCTS
Co
Muskegon, Mich.

200 E. Waslington
Ann Arbor '

117 Pearl
Ypsilanti

I

w;

TYPEWRITERS
For Sale and Rent
TYPrEW RITIN0
31imeographing .
Fraternity and Social Stationery
0. D. MORRILL
322 South State Street
~-

STOP AT -
TUTTLES
338 MAYNARD
For Lunohes and Sodas

I

i

campaign declare that uncounted mil-
lions are being spent, and that the ex-
penditures have increased since theY
day, not so many months ago, when.c
counter efforts were begun-counter
efforts that with a comparativelyin-
significant amount of money have ac-
complished wonders by their tact and
cleverness.r
The German propaganda is operatedi
in a score of ways, but the chief meth-
od is the presentation of the German,
viewpoint and German news in the
papers, but because it is clumsy it
is vastly less effective than the out-
lay should warrant. In brief, Ger-
many has tried and is trying to in-
fluence Swiss public opinion as if
the Swiss people could - clearly under-
stand the German way of thinking. ;
Germans Acquire Papers;
As the basis of its propaganda work
here, Germany acquired a number ofj
newspapers in Switzerland-several in
the German language and one pub-
lished in French, the latter now un-
der suspension. Similarly, the "Swiss"
papers in the German language area
quite as obviously German as the Ber-
lin Lokal Anzeiger or the Cologne Ga-
zette except that they are immeasura-
bly less able.
Then the Germans acquired or start-
ed a whole series of news agencies
through which to distribute their
news. Soon, however, these. agen-
cies added another and vastly more
important function, that of collecting
and transmitting news from countries
at war with Germany-news, however,
carefully colored if not actually dis-'
torted. It was in this direction that
the German propaganda began to be
dangerously effective.
"Swiss" Agencies Give Colored News
While German newspaper men them-
selves could only roost along the Ital-
ian border at Lugano, and the French
at Geneva, and transmit colored news
from Italian and French newspapers
to Germany, the neutral Swiss corre-
spondents of the so-called "Swiss"
agencies had free access to Italy and
France. They carefully chose all the
misleading, even though technically
accurate, news they could squeeze by
of the censor. If a sensational and
uninfluential deputy in the French or
Italian chamber makes an attack on
the government, it is faithfully flash-
ed to Switzerland; if a score of women
in Rome throw stones during a pro-
test meeting. Switzerland hears of
the "rioting" that is gravely menacing
the established order in Italy.
With America's entry into the war
the agencies went a step farther and
rendered another important vervice to
Germany, for some of them began to
send, both to Switzerland and to Ger-
many, distorted news from the United
States. Again and again the reliable,
the genuinely Swiss journals, issued
denials or published the correct news,
The first effect was not to be corrected
by later stories.
NO DEMONSTRATION WHEN

SEE U.S.
When in the market for Lum-
ber, Sash, Doors, Interior
Finish, Office lFixtures, and
Special Mill work.

tained by the navy department from
Captain Haldor Smith of the American
schooner R. C. Slade, and three other
mariners who landed at Tutuila in an
open boat, Sept. 29, after being ma-
rooned on Mopeha Island by the mas-
ter of the Seeadler when the raider
grounded and was abandoned.
The Seeadler, formerly the Ameri-
can ship Pass of Balmaha, belonged to
the Boston Lumber company and was
in the Nova Scotia trade before the
war. After the war broke out, she
was put under the American flag. She
was captured by the British and a
prize officer was put aboard her with
instructions to take her to Kirkwall,
Scotland. On the way, she was cap-
tured by a German submarine and sent
to , Bremen, where she was fitted out
as a raider. A picked crew was placed
aboard, some of whom spoke Norwe-
gian, and the vessel was sent out in-
to the Atlantic under the guise of a
Norwegian ship.
Seeadler Stopped By British
The ruse worked so well that, after
leaving Bremen on Dec. 21, 1916, the
Seeadler was held up by the British
auxiliary cruiser, Highland Scot, ex-
amined and passed. 'Sailors' identifi-
cation books issued by the Norwegian
government were furnished the men,
alhtough they probab ywere taken
from captured Norwegian vessels and
given to men who seemed to ft the
descriptions given. These, together
with pictures of Norwegian kings and
queens gave hte ship the appearance
of a Norwegian.
Captain Smith learned that, while
cruising in the Atlantic, 13 ships valued
by the Germans at 60,000,000 marks
were captured, and also four in the
Pacific, the R. C. Slade, the American
schooner, A. B. Johnson, the American
schooner Manila, and the French
schooner, Lutece.
Relating the story of the capture of
his ship, the R. C. Slade, Captain
Smith said:
"I left Sydney on April 24, 1917, and
proceeded without any incident until
the evening of June 17, when I was in
latitude about two north and longitude
150 west. On the evening of June 17,
about 5 o'clock, the second mate re-
about 5 o'clock, the second mate report-
I went on deck and looked aft, and in-
stantly, as I came on deck, they fired
again, and I saw the shell fall short
about two miles. She was about eight
miles off. There was a heavy squall
starting to eastward-wind favorable
to this time-and, as I thought it pos-
sible to get away, I kept holding on.
But she kept firing on me at inter-
vals of about five to- 10 minutes, and
was coming up on me fast.
Ninth Shot Comes Close
"The ninth shot, fired about six o'-
clock, struck very close, passing the
poop and splashing the water on the
ship. Then I concluded that there
wasn't any use, and I lowered down
spanker, clewed down topsail, hoisted
the American flag, and hove to. About
seven o'clock the raider was up along-
side and asked what ship. I told him
what it was, and he told me to lower
down sails, and stand by, and that he
would send an officer aboard me.
Shortly after, the prize officer came
aboard with a doctor and 10 men.
These officers were in uniform. They
told me to leave the ship and to go
on board the raider, and that they
would give me time in tfhe morning
to pack my clothes.
"They took all our men aboard the
raider except the cok. Next morning
I went back on board with all my
men and packed up. We left the ship
with our belongings, June 18. We were
put on board the raider again. Short-
ly after I saw from the raider that
they had cut holes in the masts, plac-
ed dynamite bombs in each mast, pu

fire to both ends of the ship, and lefi
her. I saw the masts go over the side
and the ship was burning from end te
end, as the raider steamed away."

fill
m

A. F. MARQUA

Sweaters
All wool Good
FURNISHINGS
VARSITY TOGGERY

Try the
Fountain of Youth
for your Candies-both boxed and plain
We make a specialty of light lunches. Call and
them at
The Fountain of Youth
Corner of State and E. Liberty

Campus Tailor

516 E.

Hot Chocolate and Soda after the Game
Drugs, Soda, Kedaks, Candles
For 30 Years the Best
~ -Suits and OCoo
- - -
Tailored to your
Individual Style

rwrw rM

---
""""

T HIS message is for you-meaning
every member of your family.
From lace curtains to your shirts and
collars, table linens and all of your
wearing apparel will be properly
latindered if they are sent to this
shop. We'll convince you.
MOE LAUNDRY
Phone 2355 204 No. Main St.
ONLY ONE CASE OF TYPHOID
FEVER IN UNIVERSITY NOW
There was only one case of typhoid
fever in the University, and this was
contracted before the student came to
Ann Arbor. Small pox has not yet
broken into the University, but it is
said to be a very hard problemto
keep it out when thereare so many
cases in the city.

JOHN i, SAUER
310 W. Liberty Street
Phone 2484 or 825-M

Coal is scarce and hard to get these days--your
may be cooler than.you like, so that studying is nor
comfortable.
The ELECTRIC HEATER is just the thing t
the chill off; no fumes nor ashes, just connect to a lamp
and the heat is there.
Then too, the cost is not so much as youWthought

HEALTH SERVICE TREATS 1624
STUDENTS DURING OCTOBER
Approximately 1,624 students were
treated at the health service during
the month-'of October. Of these 723
had never been to the health ser-
vice. Seventeen people were sent to
the hospital during the month and
there was one death.
Cases of eyestrain were -quite num-
erous last month especially amongrthe
freshmen. Trouble resulting from-

S<

is really quite, cheap to operate.

THE

DETROIT EDISON

food poisoning was

Dr. W. E. Forsythe, head of the The health'service
health service said that he was not keep boarding houses
ready to make a campaign among the from letting food st
students for vaccination, but urged warm places.
that all students who have not been
treated within a reasonable time to U. of M. Jewelry.
have the matter attended to at once. is tne place. 113 S.

also on the list.
will endleavor to
s and restaurants
tand too long. in
J. L. Chapman's
Main.-Adv.

Main and William Sts.

Ann Arbor,

PENN LEAVES

FOR BOSTON

Lava Copy
at
Quarry's aam!
The Delta

tNG

ILSI?, Cop'
at
S:Students='
Suppl Stut

11

IV]

WANTED
WANTED-A prominent Manufactur-
ing Fraternity Jewelery company de-
sires the services of a young man
who is a hustler. Prefer a man be-
longing to a National College Fra-
ternity to sell to the various Col-
leges. Good territory. Address E. J.,
care of this paper, stating qualifica-
tions.
WANTED--A banjorine player for or-
chestra work. Also'to buy a second
hand banjo. mandolin and a B flat
tenor saxophone. Low pitch. Call
1050-3.
WANTED --By a house club for the
school year; to rent a good Victrola
with records. Address care.of Daily
office, Box T.
WANTED-Boarders at 803 So. State-
Home cooking - Separate dining
room for girls.

LOST'
LOST-Army blan.ket lost during Cor-
nell game in section EE19. Please
return to, Athletic association office
at Press Bldg. Reward,
LOST-Ladies gold Elgin watch. Init-
ials D. F. S., with old English fob.
Phone 765-J. 115 . Park Terrace.
Reward.
LOST-Leather pocket book contain-
ing sum of money and ring. Finder
please return to Thomas Reid, 1209
S. Unv. Reward.
LOST-Why bemoan the loss of that
article when you can get it back
through this column.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE-1914 Studebaker, five
passenger. Electric lights and start-
er. Fully equipped. $226. Phone
Johnson, 1407.

Philadelphia, Nov. 9.-The Univer-
sity of ,Pennsylvania football squad
left here t'oday for Boston, where the
team will meet Dartmouth, Saturday.
Because of the war, Provost Smith
requested a "silent send-off" for the
squad so the usual noisy demonstra-
tion at the railroad station was dis-
pensed with. More than 300 under-
graduates, alumni and other rooters
for the Red and Blue will leave for
Boston tonight.
Coach Folwell said his men were in
good condition, but declined to offer
a prediction as to the outcome of the
struggle.
Wets Lead In Ohio By 1,102 Majority
Cincinnati, Nov. 10.-While the three
days see-saw of the wet and dry re-
turns in the prohibition election in
Ohio has been at a standstill for
thirty hours, the issue is still in doubt
tonight although the wets ar leading
by an indicated majority of 1,102.

-

|

MMONNOW"

Photographic Camera with ac-
cessories for Sale: 612 x S .
Universal Camera. Rochester
Optical Co. ;Rapid Rietrlinear'
lens. Equivalent focus, 11 in.
back lens 17, front lens, 23 in.
Also wide angle lens. Gundlach
Patent Shutter and Diagram.
Holders, trays, frames.

INQUIRE, 110 NORTH
STATE STREET

40 Sha
50 Sha
10 Sha
WE WILL
Hoover
Reo Mo

WE WILL SELL
50 Shares Hoover

Ball

Crowell Becomes Assistant Sec. of War
Washington, Nov. 10.-Major Bene-
dict Crowell of Cleveland, an engineer
officer now in charge of the Washing-
ton office of the Panama Canal, was
appointed assistant secretary of war
today to succeed William M. Ingra-
ham. Mr. Ingraham was made sur-
veyor of hte board of Portland, Me.,
and accepted the appointment.
Students To Form Dante League

I

i

Lyndon's for Eastman KodakU and
Films. Open Sunday from 9:30 to
4.30 only.-Adv.

~1

LISTEN!

There is going to be a
Shortage of Victrolas
before Christmas

Make Your Selection Early

A Michigan chapter of the Dan
league of America will be formed u
der the direction of Margaret Kle
'18, for the benefit of students int(
ested in Italian literature and la
guage.
All universities in the country a
-considering the movement in prepa
ation for the celebration of the 60.
anniversary of the death of Dante.

ntp

S11

..

EASY TERMS
GRINNELL BROS.
116 So. Main Street

We will deliver your
Victrola any time you
say

g and iron-1

Always-Daily Service-Always.

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