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November 11, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-11-11

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THE WEATHER
FAIR AND COLDER
TODAY

3kvA6

Iaitg

ASSO(

DAY AND NIGHT
SERVICE

XVIII. No. 36.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 1917.

PRICE THRI

ostmen

Whip

Ithacans

By

42-0

Sc

DECSIV BTTLE
NOW I MM I NENT I N
ITALIANSECTOR
BRITISH FORCES WIN ANOTHER
VICTORY ON WESTERN
FRONT
PETROGRAD FURNISHES
NO NEW INFORMATION
English Troops in Palestine Pursue
Fleeing Turks; Inflict Heavy
Casualties
(By Association Press)
With the opposing forces of Italy
and Austra-Hungary lined up along a
30-mile reach of the Piase river in its
lower course, the armies are in fight-
ing touch with each other on a wide
front stretching westward.
A real test of strength seems im-
minent for the first time since the
Italian armies in northeastern Italy
began their retreat from the Isonzo
river. Hitherto in this campaign the
main forces of the Austro-Hungarians
have been thrust into Italy from the
northeast. The Teutonic armies ap-
parently have now begun to start their
pressure with their right wing from
the north. The Austro-Hungarian
forces are now pressing forward in
the Sugano valley. Upon success of
this drive from the north depends the
stability of the whole Italian front to
the east, as well as retaining posses-
sion of Venice.
On the western line the British have
wen another victory on the Flanders
front. Attacking early Saturday upon
a 2,500-yard front, they made substant-
ial gains in the Passchendaele region.
British forces in Palestine are con-
tining their northern march in pur-
suit of the retreating Turks. The
British have taken more than 70 guns,
and have inflicted casualitie of 10,-
000 men upon the Turks.
Advices from Petrograd today were
lacking', and no additional light was
thrown upon the situation created
by the Maximalists.,
SELECT MEN FOR
CENTRAL DEBATE
Six Men Chosen From Both Alpha Nu
and Adelphi Societies; Law
School Gives Six
iFrst steps towards the selection
of two teams for the Central league
debate have been made by the literary
societies and Law school to the extent
that 18 men have been selected to
compete in the first general elimina-
tion contest.
Six men have been selected from
the Alpha Nu and from the Adelphi
society. Due to the depleted condi-
tion of the Law students the Jeffer-
sonian and Webster societies have
been unable to carry on their wprk as
in previous years and instead of each
society giving six men, only six were
selected from the Law school at large.
Those selected are as follows: Al-
pha Nu, J. D. Menchofer, '18, Earl
Gasar, '18, Carl Brandt, '20, E. W.
Brandt,.'20, E. W. Dunn, '20, S. M. Ep-
stein, '19, and John C. Cary, '19.
Adelphl Kelsey Guilfoil, '19, H. Aug-
ust, '19, Ralph Gault, '19, H. Parzen,'
'19, I. Himmelbock, '20, and Wilfred

Nevue, '20.
Lew school, Donald McKane, '19L,
A. J. Adams, '18L, T. L. McCormick,
'18L, Charles Cohn, '18L, N. D. Ireland,
'18L, and R. W. Ward, '20L.
The first elimination contest will be
held on or about November 19.
Music In Two Keys Spoils Anthem
Two sets of music in different keys
were responsible for the peculiar ren-
dition of the "Star Spangled aBnner"
on Ferry field yesterday afternoon, ac-
cording to Capt. Wilfred Wilson, di-
rector of the University band. The
confusion resulted from the adoption
of copies of the song at the time of
the M. A. C. game especially arranged
to harmonize with -those used by the
Aggie band.

LITERARY CLASSES
CHOOSE OFFICERS
Results Announced Last Night Show
Joseph Broderick Junior
Class President
Results of three class elections in
the literary collegewere announced
last night as follows:
Juniors-President, Joseph Broder-
ick; vice-president, Frances MacDon-
ald; secretary, Anna MacMahon;
treasurer, Gerald F. Nye; oratorical
delegate, W. J. Kennick; women's or-
atorical delegate, Vera Andrus; stu-
uent councilman, James McClintock.
Sophomores -President, D. A.
Forbes; vice president, Elsie Erley;
secretary, Marguerite Chapin; treas-
urer, C. B. Stegner; oratorical dele-
gate, R. A. Forcyth; women's orator-
ical delegate, Dorothy Williams.
Freshmen-President, Fred Petty;
vice-president, Dorothy Herrmann,
secretary, Elinor Leonard; treasurer,
Lee Woodruff; oratorical delegate, Al-
bert Jacobs; women's oratorical dele-
gate, Margaret McDoald.
TAXI COMPANIES IGNORE
PROTESTS O- STUDENTS
ASSERT THAT 10 CENT RAISE
WILL GO INTO EFFECT
5 MONDAY
In response to the agitation of
Michigan students against the pro-
posed taxicab rate increase, the taxi
companies have issued the following
signed statement:
"Taxicab companies announce that
on and after Monday, Nov. 12, 1917,
an increase of 10 cents will be effec-
tive over the old 25 cent rate on pas-
sengers and baggage. Companies feel
it is an absolute necessity, as at the
time it was submitted to the council
we were willing to wait areasonable
length of time, but according to the
complaints which have been issued in
the last few days in the Michigan
Daily protesting against such an or-
dinance and the litigation which is
now expected, we now feel that time
should be taken to convince the peo-
ple that these rates are necessary to
maintain taxicab service at Ann Ar-
bor.
"The increase we are asking is but
a slight one. We have no criticism
to offer against anyone and are only
asking abfair, legitimate price and are
reasonably sure that the councilmen
of Ann Arbor, as well as our patrons,
will realize the importance of this.
"It will be but a few weeks when
all will be convinced that there was
nothing but fairness shown on the part
of the taxicab companies and that the
new'rates are fair and just to all."
According to one council member
this action may be looked upon un-
favorably by those 'of the council who
believe that "they can run their ordi-
nance adjustments without the aid of
outsiders," as the member expressed
it.
Challenge Professor Strauss
"If Prof. Louis Strauss or any oth-
er member of the University faculty
or student body can prove that we are
wrong in our demands, I will gladly
submit. I challenge Professor Strauss
to prove his charges made against us
at the meeting of the ordinance com-
mittee to be held in a few days," de-
clared William Meyers, manager of the
Buick Sales and Service company, yes-
terday, when asked what he thought
of the proposed increase of rates fa
taxi fares for Ann Arbor.

"We have been charging the pres-
ent rates for the past 20 years," con-
tinued Mr. Meyers. "These rates were
in existence at the time when gasoline
was nine cents a gallon, and when
labor and tires were cheap. At the
rate that prices are rising at present,
we find that we can no longer. contin-
ue a decent existence. We are only
asking a slight increase in our rates.
We can prove in black and white that
we could not long continue under the
present existing conditions, and can-
not see how any council could deny
our request after having examined
our financial conditions. No govern-
ing body, the council or ordinance
committee, can justly refuse to grant
(Continued on Page Six)

TO WOLVERI
POWERFUL Al
VARSIT'S TIGERISH
DISRUPTS VISITORS
FENSE

WESTON.
STAR

AND LA
FORM

ONE OF THE SPECTACULAR PLAYS IN YESTERDAY'S WALK - AWAY

CANADIAN OFFICER TOGALENS TAKE IN
13 NEW MEMBERS
AID N ~IB FUD DRV~iUpperclag Medical Society Initiates

WILSON PLACES DRAFT
MACHINERY INl MOTION

LIEUTENANT G. S. REID TO
PRESENT AT MEETING
. WEDNESDAY

BE

Lieut. G. S. Reid, of the 26th over-
seas Canadian battalion, is expected
to be present "Wednesday. evening at
the students' friendskip fund cam-
paign meeting in Hill auditorium.
Lieut. Reid, who has just returned
from service on the Flanders front,
has received the Military Cross for
bravery. With two other young Cana-
dian officers he has been lent to the
Michigan Y. M. C. A. by Major Temple-
ton, head of the British-Canadian re-
cruiting mission in Detroit, for cam-
paigning in the state during the war
fund drive.,
Men who have promised to serve in
the students' war fund campaign are
expected to be present at a one-hour
meeting to be held at 6:30 o'clock to-
night at Lane hall. Others interested
in the campaign are invited to attend.
ALLIED OFFICERS REVIEW
15,000 CAMP CUSTER MEN
Battle Creek, Nov. 10.- Presenting
the- largest military spectacle ever
appearing in the state of Michigan, 15,-
000 Camp Custer men passed in review
yesterday before Major-General Dick-
man and his distinguished guests from
the British and French armies.
The 85th division of the New Na-
tional arriy, after ;forming on the
south side of the field, swung into line
and led by Brigadier-General Morse,
marched out across the parade grounds
to the stirring music of the division
band. The army marched in platoon
Karolne Klager, '00, in Address at
very effective and well organized fight-
ing machine.
Rosenthal, 18E, To Enter Service
J. H. Rosenthal, '18E, left yesterday
for service with the four hundred
ninteenth depot detachment, engin-
eers, United States army, at Camp,
Devens, Ayer, -Mass.
The dye for the horizon blue uni-
forms of the French army is furnished
by a German firm.

Wednesday Evening at
Michigan Union
Galens, upperclass medical society,
initiated 13 new men Wednesday ev-
ening at the Union.
After the initiation a banquet was
given at which Dr. Mark Marshall of-
ficiated as toastmaster. The new men
taken into the society are. Dr. Q. O.
Gilbert, P. H. Piper, '18M, C. E. Badg-
ley, '19M, J. H. McKiney, '19M, H. D.
Barnard, '19M, R. M. McKean, '19M, C.
E. Roser, '19M, T. L. Squiers, '19M, L.
F. Thalner, '19M, H. F. Becker, '19M,
W. H. Ludwig, '19M, T. Raphael, '19M,
and F. 0. Novy, '19M.
FRENCH OFFICERS
PRAISE S AMMIES
Declare Michigan and Wisconsin Men
Better Prepared Than Some of
Those in France
Camp MacArthur, Waco, Tex., Nov.
10.-Completing a tour of inspection
yesterday, the four French officers
newly arrived here to train the 31st
division, declared that Michigan and
Wisconsin troops were almost ready
for battle, being far better trained al-
ready than they had hoped.
Lieut. Robert Thurpin, veteran of
Verdun and winner of the Crosse de
Guerre for gallantry as a grenadier,
said, "I am astonished at the pro-
gress of your American soldiers made
in so short a time. They are better
trained now than some of the men al-
ready in the trenches."
Besides inspecting the camp and
men, the French new comers witness-
ed some grenade throwing and prac-
tice fighting on which they based their
statements.
Oregon Students Wear Uniforms
Army, uniforms will be the regular*
garb of all male students at Oregon
university next semester if the recom-
mendation of a special committee is
accepted by the faculty. The suits
will be handy for military drill and
are appropriate for training corps
men.

SECOND CALL WILL NOT
MADE BEFORE MIDDLE
OF FEBRUARY

Washington, Nov. 10.-President{
Wilson formally put into operation to-
night the machinery for carrying out
the selective draft bill. The step was
marked by the completion of the fore-
word which he has written to the
regulations under which the second
call will be made. The rdgulations
themselves and the questionnaires,'
which more than 9,000,000 men will
be required to fill out, are being for-
warded to the local boards.
The war department officially esti-
mates that the process can be com-
pleted within 60 days. This means
that no second call will be made upon
the draft forces before the midle of
next February,. as the period of class-
ifying the list will not begin until
Dec. 15th.
The president' describes the next
plan to divide all registered men into
five classes as being intended to pro-
duce "a more perfect organization of
man power.!' "The selective draft
must be carried to itsfinal conclus-
ion," he added. "There must be a1
complete record of the classification
of each registrant, in order to place
in military index the group rank of
the nation into which the drawn men
can best be placed to serve the com-'
mon good."l
CONFERENCE VOTE NOT IN ON
POST-SEASON GAME QUESTION
LaFayette, Ind., Nov. 10.-Dr. T. P.1
Moran, 'of -Purdue university, chair-
man of the big ten conference, tonight
stated that the colleges in the confer-a
ence had not all voted on the question'
of sanctioning post-season games. 1
He intimates that no serious ob-
jections to such games had yet been
urged. Dr. Moran will announce the,
result as soon' as the votes are all in.
Belgian Scholar To Lecture Tuesday
Victor Horta, the distinguished Bel-
gian scholar, will deliver two illus-
trated lectures at Alumni Memorial
hall next week. He will. lecture on
"The Germans and Belgians in France"
at 4:15 o'clock Tuesday afternoon and
on "Cathedrals and Public Buildings
of Belgium and Northern France as
Affected by the War," on Wednesday
at the same hour.
Indiana First to Score on Ohio State
Indiana was the first team to score
on Ohio State this season. Also the
Crimson squad held the Buckeye to'
the lowest score of any of their games
thus far.

BE1

Tad Wieman Boots Over Fou
and CohnAdds Another
Fourth Period
Past defeats were forgotten
day as Michigan romped throu
nell's line, around her en
down the, field for six tou
while the Ithacans struggled
seldom able to gain more that
or two, never showing sufficle
ina to seriously endanger the
defended by Yost's'well train
balanced, aggregation.
The score, 42-0, represents thl
est margin by whic Mchig
ever triumphed over Cornell.
result of what many critics
sidelines pronounce to be th
expert squad of pigskin toss
has turned out in years.
Weston Gains Added Ron
Throughout, the contest-e
only in name for so demorali
the visiting team that the pu:
fight of former years was ci
ous by Its absence-one maxi
forth as the brightest light on
composed chiefly of stars. TI
was Weston, little, daringu
ous, speedy Weston, the gua
who entered'the limelight una
ed several weeks ago when Cli
was disabled and gloom had
'menacingly over the Wolverin
In previous games this seas
ton has proved that he is 4a
posing elevens must constantl
and are bound to continuous
Never before has he so repeat
cled the visitors' ends for lon
never before l~as he so ably
the play of the victorious Y
never before has he proved
clusively that he is able to
emergencies, great or small,
skill and precision and accurat
of a seasoned veteran.
Lambert Superb on Defe
But Weston was not the
show." The other backfield n
loomed up as powerful, brainy
fighters, men that lichigan w
remember, athletes of whom
iversity might well be proud,
the line crouched seven cou:
tenacious fellows, led by acti
tain Lambert, as fine a/ ce
Michigan has. seen since "G4
Shultz disconcerted his enex
his bodily onslaughts.
Paddy won place in the he
Michigan rooters which fath
cannot erase and the spirit c
igan will never give up. He
man that ruled the destinies
Cornell players when they .
cidently broken through the fl
of defense. With uncanny a
Lambert sailed the ball back
backfield and not a single mis
registered against him in thi
or for the entire season. Camp
ers were last night predicti
Lambert, as well as Westc
bound to be members of Camp
ical eleven.
It was a great game andi
day for staging the battle that
all previous defeats. The sta
filled to their limit with "men
igan," old and young and the
of the fair sex, mums and kha
were a fitting background :
event in Michigan's athletic h
"Every Man In Every P
It 'was the same team with
ception of Sparks at left 10
has conquered every opponent
was a punch in the attack and
wall defense that left Corn
hausted and groggy after i
quarter. There was no let u
[terrific pounding of -the 1n
fraction of a second, not u
final whistle had blown and tb
wreckage had painfully limp

WESLEYAN GUILD LECTURE
RUSSELL H. CONWELL.
OF PHILADELPHIA+
Subject:
"Acres of Diamonds"'

TO-NIGHT.
7:30

METHODIST CHURCH

TO-NIGHT
7:30

1

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