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November 10, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-11-10

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HE WEATHER1
NERALLY FAIR AND
WARNER

r 41k i a

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WI]
SEBVICE

XVIII. No. 35.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 1917.

PRICE THREE

A

MERICA TO KEEP
11 WITH RI
RELIEF A MAUE

STATEMENT APPLIES TO CON-
TRACTS PLACED WITH
LOAN MONEY
OFFICIAL REPORTS OF
PETROGRAD LACKING
Washington Still Hopes Kerensky
May Escape and Regain His
Control.,
Washington, Nov. 9.-Russia's bat-
est upheaval will not change the atti-
tude of the American gevrnment to-
wards measures under way for the re-
lief of economic conditions in the de-
moralized country.
This statement, applying particular-
ly to contracts placed with money
borrowed from the United States for
huge quantities of shoes and clothing
for the civilian population, was the
only authorized comment of the state
department today upon the overthrow
of the Kerensky government at Pet-
rograd.
Official advices from the Russian
capital still are lacking.
The situation was discussed at to-
day's cabinet meeting but Secre-
tary Lansing was unable to add any-
thing to information appearing in the
newspapers.
Until the situation clears, the state
department and war department will
make no announcement as to the prob-
able effect of the change at Petro-
grad upon the relations of the United
States with Russia and the conduct o
the war against Germany. It is ap-
parent, however, that there is still a
lingering hope in the official mind
that the revolution may be localized
in Petrograd and that Kerensky may
escape to rally around him the ele-
ments necessary to run his govern-
ment at Moscow or some other place.
AMERICAN SAILORS' WIVES WILL
HAVE TO STAY BACK HOME NOW
American Flotilla Base in British
Waters, Nov. 9.-Henceforth American
naval officers and men will not be per-
mitted to bring their wives from the
United States. The order to this ef-
feet has been promulgated by the
commanding officer of the flotilla.
An American officer of high rank
justifies the action on the ground of
added efficiency. He says, "We must
get the maimum of efficiency out of
our officers and- men. They must be
unfettered if they are to go wherever
they are sent at any time. To have
their wives following them around
from one base to another would not
only be unjust to the cause, but to
the husbands themselves. The men
must remember that this is war, and
that their wives are better off back
home where they can b of infinitely
more service to the nation."
U. S. MEN IN GERMAN PRISONS
FED THROUGH AID OF RED CROSS
Washington, Nov. 9.-Sammies in
German prison camps will be supplied
with rations by the Red Cross. One mil-
lion eight hundred thousand individual
rations will be forwarded to the dis-
tributing agent in Berne, Switzerland.
This is sufficient to supply 10,000 men
for six months.
Food of the same quality that is
Issued to the bys in the trenches.
islbetshipped from Berne to the
prison camps in 10-pound cans. Al-
though doubt is sometimes expressed
as to whether these food supplies will'
ever reach the prisoners, the experi-
ence of the English and French agen-
cies is that the loss is negligible.

Roosevelt Pleased At Women's Victory
New York, Nov.' 9.-Colonel Roose-
velt declared, after the achievement
of the franchise by the women of
New York, "It was indeed a wonderful
victory and I am well pleased."
Colonel Roosevelt has been for a
long time an ardent advocate for suf-
frage. During the past three months
he has not only 'made several speech-
es in its favor, but has also written
many articles about it. In praise of
the voters, the ex-president says that
the outcome is an honor to every man

SOUVENIR PROGRAM
MAKES APPEARANCE
Issue Has Military Spirit; Numerous
Pictures Included; 6,000
Copies Printed
Clad in colors of red, yellow, and
blue, the souvenir number of the Ath-
letic Program made its appearance
upon the campus and at the book-
stores at noon yesterday. The poster
cover design, an unusual composition
of a yell leader and. football crowd,
was drawn by Reed Bachman, '20.
The inside of the book is made in-
teresting by the action pictures of the
season's games, portraits of Prof. R.
W. Aigler and "Pat" Smith, cuts of
the squad, and individual pictures of
the Cornell and Michigan players.
The war-time spirit of the program
is emphasized by the presence of a
dedicatory poem entitled, "To Michi-
gan's Athletes In the War" History
of, athletics, Michigan's football rela-
tions with Cornell, statistics concern-
ing the team, and bits of gossip from
the training quarters serve to make
the program so attractive that it will
be, as Editor J. E. Campbell, '18, says,
"As necessary as 'mums' at .he
game.,,
Five thousand copies of the pro-
gram have been printed, and are ex-
pected to be disposed of by the time
the first whistle blows on Ferry field.
TWO NURSES 1ARROWLY
ESCAPE ODTH IN FIRE
CONFLAGRATION AT UNIVERSIT
HOSPITAL SAUSES $2,500
DAMAGE
Two nurses of the University hos-
pital narrowly escaped death near
midnight Wednesday when the roof of
the nurses' home, 1008 Cornwell
place, fell in during a fire and block-
ed their path to the stairway. One
of the nurses, in her fright, was,
about to jump from the window, when
members of nearby fraternities has-.
tened to their rescue.
The fire broke out in the southeast-
ern corner of the third floor at 11:30
o'lock, but was held under full con-
trol by the Ann Arbor fire depart-
ment in about 20 minutes. The cause
of the fire is not known, but it is
believed to have resulted from a brok-
en electric wire.
The damages are estimated at
$2,500. Most of the furniture and be-
longings of the nurses were saved
and removed from the burning house,
with the help of the members of the
Theta Delta Chi, Sigma Phi, and Kap-
pa Sigma fraternities.j
CONWELL TO GIVE LECTURE,
"ACRES OF DIAMONDS"
- --
Russell H. Conwell will give his
famous lecture, "Acres of Diamonds,"
at 7:30 o'clock Sunday night at the
Methodist church. Mr. Conwell has
not spoken in *Ann Arbor for 15
years, and a special effort was made,
to have him come at this time. ,
Mr. Conwell is president of Temple
university of Philadelphia, of which
he is the founder. In the course of his
life he has been a lawyer, an army
officer, an immigration agent, a news-
paper correspondent, pastor of Grace
church of Philadelphia, a writer, and,
lecturer.
OPENS TEMPORARY BRISCOE
DISPLAY ROOM IN ARCADE

H. L. Frost, local distributor of Bris-
coe motor cars, has opened a tempor-
ary display room in the Nickles Ar-
cade. Associated with Mr: Frost, is
Charles H. Barrett, as sales manager.
Mr. Barrett claims from 22 to 23 miles
per gallon of gasoline for his car, the
increased mileage resulting from 15
months study of automibile engine
construction by the company's engin-
eers in France.

LOSESCOM'MAND
Given Post on New Inter-Allied Con-
ference with Generals Foch
and Wilson
DIAS PLACED IN CHIEF
COMMAND, OF ITALIAN ARMY

YSAYE DELIGHTS
LARGE AUDIENCE
Violinist Receives Much Applause;
Accompanist Gives Piano
Solos

"THREE MONTHS'ARMISTICE"5is P1.1
OFMAXIMALISTS1 "REPRESENTATI?
NOT DIPLOMATS TO WORK FOR/ PEE

British Infantry, War Vessels,
Airplanes Force Turks to
Retreat

and

(Rome, Nov. 9, by Ass. Press.)
General Cadorna has been removed

from supreme command of the Italian
armies and given a post on the new
inter-allied conference yesterday
members of which will be the noted
French General Foch and General Wile.
son, sub-chief of the British general
staff. General Diaz has been placed in
chief command of the Italians.
The Italian armies continue their
retreat across' the Venetian plains to-
ward the Piave river, where it is ex-
pected a stand will soon be made
aided by large reinforcements from
the British and French armies, under
a newly formed military command
which is to work in conjunction with
a prominent inter-allied conference of
military officers.
The reports from Russia still re-
main meager. Contradictory rumors
continue to circulate as to the where-
abouts of Premier Kerensky, it hav-
ing been reported that he was under
arrest and being taken back to Pet-
rog 'ad for trial by courtbmartial and
also that he was continuing his
journey toward the front in an en-
deavor to strengthen the morale of the
troops and put-down the revolution.
There has been little activity on
the western front in France and Bel-
gium'except in the nature of reciD-
rocal bombardments and small raid-
ing operations.
In Palestine, the British forces have
gained a notable victory over the,
Turks who are in retreat along the en-
tire front, with British and French
war vessels harassing them from the
Mediterrean and air men bombing
their retreating columns. More than
40 guns have been taken from the
enemy.
SHARPE PESSIMISTIC

4'
'
11
r
l
t
P

Ysaye received more enthusiastic
applause last night than any violinist
who has come to Ann Arobr in years.
His perfect technique and splendid in-
terpretation were highly appreciated
by his large audience. He was ably
accompanied by Miss Victoria Boshko,
who also gave an interesting group
of piano solos.
Ysaye is loyal to Belgium and gives
much of the proceeds of his concerts
to war relief work. In March, 1916,
he played in many of the trenches of
France, and in one instance aeroplanes
were flying above him. Ysaye has
three sons in the war, and has had
no word from his family in a year.
He expresses himself to a Daily re-
porter to the effect that he does not
believe that artists with pro-German
sympathies should be allowed to play
before American audiences. He has,
no doubt but that this war will be
the making of the United States.
Ui So SERVICE OFFERS
OPENINFOR WOMEN
SPEAKER AT CONFERENCE TELLS
OF MANY GOOD OPPOR-
TUNITIES

*
*
*
*
3
f
:
E
*k
*
c*

We want to score !
We want to score!
More and More !
More and More !
Hurry Up! Michigan! Rah!
The yell given above is the
composition of "Skee" Poleski
and was tried at the mass meet-
ing Thursday night with consid-
erable success. The %rst line is
given in a low rumbling tone and
each succeeding line is given with
more volume ,until the "Hurry-
up! Michigan! Rah!" is reached
and given as loudly as possible.

*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*

Smolny
of

* HERE'S MICHIGAN'S NEW YELL *

Jnstitute Now Headqua
New Regime; Capital is
Quiet

REVOLUTIONARY C OMM I T 'I
HOLD GOVERNMENT
OFFICES
"JUST" PEACE TERMS
ONLY TO BE ACCEPI

Cornell

Coach Expects Defeat
Hands of Wolverines

"Government service offers espec-
ially favorable opportunities for the
woman with a college training," sta-
ted Miss Katherine Klager, '00, at the
women's league vocational conference
meeting yesterday afternoon at Bar-]
bour gymnasium.
Miss Klager is at present assistant
librarian of the department of agri-
culture at Washington and treasurer
of the college women's club of that
city. Her work at the capitol has giv-
en her opportunity for close obser-
vation of the work in the industrial
offices there, and especially that phase
in which she is particularly interested
--positions open to women.
"There are three main lines of oc-
cupation open to women wishing to
enter the field of government service,
positions of distinction, positions re-
quiring technical training, and those
requiring business training," stated
Miss Klager.
Among the women holding so-called
, positions of distinction were mention-
ed two Michigan alumnae, Clara Bell
Barnett, '95, chief librarian of the
department of agriculture, and Marie
Obenauer, '93, head of the women's
war section of the United States em-
ployment service. Other women in
this group are Jeanette Rankin, the
well known congresswoman from Mon-
tana Julia C. Lathrop, chief of the
children's bureau.
Most college women, Miss Klager
explained, are best fitted for one of
the lines in technical training, which
includes scientific, social and research
workers, librarians and translators.
In the business line, there is a de-
mand for expert stenographers, type-
writers; clerks, and copyists, not only
in the offices at Washington, but
throughout the country.
Miss Gertrude Hill of the Episcopal
training school of Chicago, was the
second speaker on the afternoon's
program and presented the possibili-
ties of religious work.

Soldiers to Sell
Douglass ' hook
Boys In Hhaki From Camp Custer To
Act as Street Sales-
men
Crowds going to Ferry field today
will no doubt be much astonished to
hear the cry of the street salesman
being taken up by men in the khaki
uniform.
Four men from Camp Custer have
gladly allowed themselves to be draft-
ed to place Coach Douglass' book on
"Football From the Standpoint of the
Spectator" on sale today. They hope
that people who have previously re-
fused to buy the book will realize that
e money realibed from the sale I
r the benefit of the soldiers them-
selves, and that Camp Custer really
wants a gymnasium. With a crowd of
25,000 expected at the game, the sol-
diers hope for a substantial addition
to their gymnasium fund.
Police To Stop Burning of Leaves
Thomas O'Brien, chief of the police
department, has issued a statement
to the people of Ann Arbor saying
that leaves must not be burned on the
streets after 12 o'clock noon. There
is a city ordinance which prohibits
this, as burning of leaves causes great
amounts of pungent smoke which are
very annoying.
"People who do not observe this ordi-
nance will be arrested and required to
pay fines," said Chief O'Brien.
Surgical Dressings Course To Start
A new course in surgical dressings
will begin at 2 o'clock November
13, at the Angell residence. College
women wishing to take this work can
make special arrangements for hours
by registering Tuesday. The course
will be divided into two parts, one
dealing with standard dressing and
the other with special dressing. The
first course will be given in six les-
sons, while the latter one will only
take five lessons.
Custer Boys To Play On Stagg Field
Chicago, Nov. 9.-Stagg field has
been turned over to the soldier boys
for Saturday, Dec. 1, by the faculty of
the University of Chicago. On this
day football players from Camp Custer
will meet the team from Camp Grant-
on, thereby taking the place of the
proposed post-season game between
the University of Michigan and the
University of Chicago.
Secretary Baker Lowers Age Limit
Baker has reduced from 21
years to 20 years and nine
months the minimum age forstu-
dents in the third officers' training
camp which is to be opened in Janu-
ary for enlisted men. The purpose is
to open the camp to men who will be
21 at the end of their three months'
training.

(By Associated Press)
Petrograd, Nov. 9.-"We plan to of-
fer an immediate armistice of three
months, during which time elected rep-
resentatives from all nations, and not
the diplomats, are to settle the ques-
tions of peace," said Nikola Lenine,
Maximalist leader in a speech before
the Workmen's and Soldiers' congress
today.
"We offer these terms," Lenine said,
"but we are willing to consider any
proposals for peage no matter from
which side. We offer a Just peace,
but will not accept unjust terms."
Garrison Takes Moscow Offices
Petrograd, Nov. 9.-The revolution-
ary committee, supported by the mil-
itary garrison, has taken over all gov-
ernment officesjn Moscow according
to a telegram received by David R.
Francis, the American ambassador,
from the Amercian council general in
Moscow. The dispatch from the coun-
cil general was dated Thursday and
added that conditions in the city were
quiet.
Winter Palace is Bullet Spattered
Petrograd, Nov. 8.-The bullet spat-
tered winter palce, the only ocular
sign of the remarkable transference
of power that has taken place in Pet-
rograd, drew thousands of the curious
among the population to the vicinity
of the structure today.
Nowhere else in the city, except per-
the new government established head-
quarters, which was the scene of un-
haps at the Smolny institute where
usual activity for this reason and be-
cause the Workmen's and Soldiers'
congress had assembled there, has the
new revolution left its mark.
Bombardment Does No Damage
Eveni the winter palace carried no
marks of last night's battle which a
coat of paint and new window pains
would not hide from the casual ob-
servation. A close inspection of the
river front side was prevented by the
sailor guards posted at the extremities
of the big structure but from the near-
by palace bridge, it could be plainly
seen that the heavy guns of the cruis-
er which bombarded the palace, shak-
ing the town during several hours of
the night, had done virtually no dam-
age.
On the land side, however, facing
the circle from which rises the gigan-
tic pillar of victory, there 'is plentiful
evidence of the work done by the ma-
chine guns and rifles during the strug-
Troops Disobey Kerensky
At the Smolny institute, the Associ-
ated Press was informed that two de-
tachments of troops headed for Pet-
rograd in response to an early appeal
from former Premier Kerensky, were
met outside the city by commissioners
and pursuaded to return to the front.'
The correspondent also wasinformed
that the armies on the northern front
had elected a revoluntary committee
which declared in support of the con-
gress. A delegation from the eleventh
army which arrived in Petrograd yes-
terday has joined the revolted garri-
sons.
A French officer, it is reported, was
wounded during last night's action.
The losses of the Workmen's and Sold-
iers' organization, are said to be one
soldier killed and several wounded.
The casualties among the defenders
of the winter palace are placed at
about 30 killed and wounded.

Detroit, Nov. 9.-A special to the
Free Press from Ithaca, N. Y., reads
in part as follows f
"We do not expect to beat Mich-
igan and will be satisfied if we hold
the Yost aggregation to a small mar-
gin of victory," said Dr. Sharpe, coach
of the Cornell team as it left Ithaca
this afternoon. It is the first time in
many years 'that the Cornell head
coach has been pessimistic about a
coming gridiron battle.
"I understad Michigan is better
than last year, while we are worse,"
said Sharpe. "If so, we will be beaten,
though my team will put up a hard
fight."
111' Pete Won't Rob For a While, Sure
Pete Harris, accused of robbing the
Delta Theta Phi fraternity, where he
was formerly employed as a porter,
was tried before Judge Kinne yester-
day and sentenced to serve one to
fifteen years in Jackson State prison.

Notice to Daily Subscribers
All unpaid subscriptions must be paid by Noon
Saturday, Nov. 10th, or $3.00 rate will be
charged. If the subscription is not paid by the
15th the paper will be stopped and a charge
made for time run.

I U

T 4r Mid jigaln tti

PINK
EDITION
NOV. 10

CORN ELL

EXTRA

PINK
EDITION
NOV. 10

Complete Story of the Game, Play by Play

Lit Election Returns Dela
Results of the elections in th
man, sophomore, and junior
of the literary college held y
will be announced in ton
Daily. Owing to unavoidab
in counting the ballots, the

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