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November 09, 1917 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-11-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Fall and Winter Styles

BORSALINO HATS

Extra Light Weight
NOW ON DISPLAY

0 - --

Wadhams & Co.

TWO STORES

STATE STREET
COR. ARCADE

MAIN STREET
COR. WASHINGTON

Do You Believe in Saving Money ?

THEN BUY YOUR MEATS OF

THE CENTURY MARKET

213 N. MAIN ST.

H. E. VOGEL, Prop.
the fluctuations of t1 market

Our prices change with

'i -

---..

A HAND BUILT
PRODUCT OF
PRIDE

C U R T IS
TIRES

FOR
EVERYTHING
ELECTRICAL
No Job too Small or too Large
WASHTENAW
ELECTRIO SHOP
"The Shop of Quality"
it it's not right we mako it right
-PHONE 273-

Adjustment Basis is 6,000
miles of service -
VULCANIZED
PRODUCTS
Co.
Muskegon, Mich.

200, E. Washington
Ann Arbor

117 Pearl
Ypsilanti

I

UNIVERSITY UNION1 IN
PARIS SATISFIES NEED'
YALE BUREAU FURNISHES FOUN-
DATION FOR UNION OF ALL
AMERICAN COLLEGES
The American University union, of
which President Harry B. Hutchins is
a trustee and Prof. Charles B. Vibbert
a member of the executive commit-
tee, was the result of two movements
-one in Paris and one in this country.
American college men abroad,
meeting for the first time in Paris,
June 18, 1917, formed the American
University alumni association' in
France in order to co-operate with
university authorities in the United
States for the general well-being of
American university and college men
who come to France.
A second factor leading to the for-
mation of the Union was the Yale bu-
reau in Paris, which was authorized
in May, 119174 to supply a headquarters
in France for Yale graduates, students,
and prospective students. The num-
ber of inquiries regarding the bureau
and the offers from other colleges to
co-operate, led its"founders to realize
that the plan should be extended to
include all American institutions of
learning.
Out of these two movements
developed the American Universi-
t-y union in Europe. Although
organized to meet the war needs,
it is the hope of its founders
that the Union may prove a perma-
nent institution, helping to attract
American college men to France for
graduate study, and to serve as an
agency for cultivating a better n-
derstanding between the United States
and the European countries.
After, many conferences with the
Red Cross, the International commit-
tee of the Y. M. C. A., and the war de-
partment, a meeting was called at
the University club, New York City,
July 15, 1917, for the purpose of es-
tablishing the American University
union; adopting a constitution, and
electing officers.
The hmn e'of the Union is the
Palace hotel on the Place du The-
atre Francais, Paris It was built
in 1911 and has accomodation
for more than 100 men, besides
public rooms for reading Fand
social purposes, and 40 modern bath-
rooms. There is a restaurant oper-
ated in connection with the hotel.
In addition to representative Eng-
lish and French journals, 50 of the
leading American daily papers, week-
lies and magazines are on file at the
Union.
To obtain the Palace hotel, a guar-
antee of about $30,000 in receipts
from room rentals for the first year
had to be assumed by the trustees in
addition to a budget for cables, mod-
erate salaries, clerical assistance, sta-
tionery, and other articles.
The American University union is
constantly expanding, having already
a branch in,London. Another branch
in the French Alps or on the Riveria is
being contemplated.
S. C. ASSOCIATION SECURES
NEW FINANCIAL SECRETARY
Mr. E.G. Hersman has been secured
as the new financial secretary of the
Students' Christian Association. The
purpose of this position is to secure
funds for carrying on the work of
both the Y. M. C. A. and the Y. W.
C. A.
Mr. Hersman is a graduate of the
University of Illinois. Previous to,

this position, he was general secretary
of the Y. M. C. A.. at Illinois univer-
sity and after that business secretary
of the Y. M. C. A. at the University of
Wisconsin. The Students' Christian
association is particularly fortunate
In securing a man of his experience.
This office is now permanently es-
tablished, though formerly similar po-
sitions were created for specific pur-
poses. Mr. Carl Smith was financial:
secretary preceding the Lane hall
building campaign, and W. H. Linker,
directed that campaign.
We are taking orders now for
"Mums" for the Saturday game and
can guarantee you the freshest and
best for 35c, if your order is left be-
fore Friday night. Phone 600. Arcade
Floral Shop.-

LANSffINGMAKES FUEL
CONSERVATION PLANS
CAPITAL CITY TAKES INITIATIVE
IN DRAWING UP DRASTIC RULES
FOR COAL SAVING
Lansing, Mich., Nov. 8.-Citizens of
the capital city are determined that
Lansing shall set the pace for Michi-
gan in fuel conservation. To this end
a committee to boost conservation
propaganda has been appointed.
If this committee's plans go
through, six o'clock will see all elec-
tric signs shut off, the capital dome in
darkness,' and all window display
lighting eliminated. All owners and
tenants of buildings downtown will
shut off heating systems after clos-
ing time, and women are being urged
to dress warmer both in offices and in
homes, in order that less heat may
be consumed. Closing of a number of
churches is being considered, and the
advocates of holding union services
for five or six congregations in one
house of worship are increasing daily.
The following suggestions to house-
holders have been issued by the com-
mittee
Put up storm windows and storm
doors.
Stuff crevices between mopboards
and wall with cloth.
Stuff spaces around loose windows
with rags.
Seal up fireplace front, for great
quantities of heat escape by way of
the fireplace.
Shut off rooms not actually needed
and hang curtains in archways.
See that there are no crevices be-
tween the underpinning of your house
and the walls. "Bank up" the house
wall if necessary..
See that basement windows are
calked.
Keep furnaces and stoves free from
soot, which prevents heat radiation.
Place thermostats on furnaces to
avoid overheating.
SIX UNIVERSITIES
DROP PRO-GERMANS

Try the
Fountain of Youth
for your Candies-both boxed and plain
We make a specialty of light lunches. Call and try
them at
The Fountain of Youth
Corner of State and E. Liberty

-
I .

Football Pictures
Hof Chocolate and Soda after the Game

Tailored to your
Individual Style

Drugs, Soda, Kedaks, Candies

IA. 1

For 30 Year the Best

U

FURNISHINGS

VARSITY TOGGERY SHOP

--

I

A. F. MARQUARDT

Campus Tailor

616 E. Williams

Sweaters
All wool Good dyes

Suits and O'coats'

.

Calkins Drug 324 S. State and
Company 1123 S. University Ave.

,-
SA
..,.s * . , b.
THIS message is for you-meaning
every member of your family.
From lace curtains to your shirts and
collars, table linens and all of your
wearing appa'rel will be properly
laundered if they are sent to this
shop. We'll convince you.
MOE LAUNDRY
Phone 2355 204 No. Main St.
TYPETYPEWRITERS
For Sale and Rent
TYPEWRITING
Mimeographing
Fraternity and Social Stationery
0. D. MORRILL
322 South State Street
Registrar Hall Gives Talk

STOP AT
TTT LES
838 MAYNARD
For Lunohes and Sodas

German Sympathizers
Aliens Dismissed
Faculties

and.
From

Enemy

i

SEE

U.

S .

When in the market
ber, Sash, Doors,

for Lum-
Interior

Finish, Office Fixtures, and
Special Mill work.

JOHN i SAUER
310 W. Liberty Street
Phone 2484 or 825-M

Memorial Hall Has Chrysanthemums
Several varieties of chrysanthemums
have been placed in the Alumni Me-

"Five universities besides Michigan
have dropped instructors from their
faculties because of pro-German sym-
pathies and utterances," said Prof. W.
H. Hobbs yesterday. Professor Hobbs
is an officer of thenational college
professors association.
The University of Illinois dismissed
four instructors last summer and is
now investigating- three other cases of
questionable conduct on the part of
certain-faculty men in connection with
the. Liberty loan. Professors J. M
Cattell and I. Dana of Columbia univer-
sity were discharged for urging con-
gress to oppose the draft bill. Be-
cause of this action on the part of the
governing body of the university Prof.
Beard resigned. These three men
were not actual German spmpathiz-
ers, but were pacifists.
Two instructors at Wisconsin who
had made pro-German utterances last
semester were not appointed this
year and Dr. Ernest Feise was recent-
ly asked to resign for the same reason.
The University of Minnesota also
had a case of disloyalty in its faculty.
Prof. W. A. Sharper,'a German subject,
was dismissed on account of his atti-
tude toward the war, though he had
been at the university for 13 years.
Two professors at Ohio State univer-
sity who were enemy aliens, were
forced to leave by action of the federal
government, as there is an aviation
schobl situated there. Other colleges
and universities, Cornell among them,
have had similar trouble but have
taken no action as yet.
Prof. Levi Lectures In Kalamazoo
Prof. Moritz Levi delivered a lec-
ture before the Cercle Francais of Kal-
amazoo last Monday night on "The
Early Dramas of Maurice Maeter-
linck." He lectured before the same
body last year on "Life in Paris."
"It was very enjoyable," said Prof.
Levi. "The people of Kalamazoo are
highly enthusiastic about everything
French."
We handle the large "mums" only.
Arcade Floral Shop. Phone 600.-Adv.

Army Stores Men!
Special six weeks
subscription to .
75c
containing all the official
notices and news of the
campus.

I

I

At vesper service yesterday after- morial hall from the botanical gar-
noon at Newberry hall, Registrar Ar dens. The plants are distributed
thur G. Hall gave an address on sub- about the lbuilding and will be left!
jects connected with the present war there during the next week.

Y.N .C.A. Notes
A call has come at the Y. M. C. A.
for students who are able to teach
English to foreigners. Anyone who
is interested should see Secretary Fet-
ter at the Y. M. C. A. in the next few
days.

...._ .

WE WILL SELL

50
100
40
50
10

Shares Hoover
Shares Universal
Shares Bower
Shares King Trailer
Shares Hayes Wheel Co

WE WILL BUY
HooverSteel Ball
Reo Motor Car

LOST

LOST- Will Student who picked up
rose colored small lamp shade on
October 4th near corner East Univ.
and So. Univ., please call 79-J.
LOST-Lady's gold wrist watch with
leather strap. Handsome reward for
return to Limberg, 1034 E. Huron.
Phone 2024-R.
LOST-Two tickets for Cornell game,
section MM, row 14, seats 1 and 2.
Finder call 2106-R. Ask for Sco-
ville.
LOST-Small medal representing Bel-
gian relief. Mrs. J. F. Breakey, 509
E. Washington St.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE-Yale bicycle, little used,
new Pennsylvania cup tires. A real
bargain-$12. Apply Ralph Stone,
Jr. 702 S. University.
FOR SALE-The Daily can sell any-
thing, it is our specialty.

FOR SALE
FOR SALE-Banjo Mandolin in per-
fect condition, almost new. Inquire
802 S. Univ. Ave. Phone 1472-W.
WANTED
WANTED--Boarders at 803 So. State-
Home cooking - Separate - dining
room for girls.
WANTED-To rent a garage near 1024
Hill St. Call 689-W.
WANTED-A porter to do consistent
work. Applicant please call 1505.
FOUND
FOUND - After examinations of re-
cruits last June, young man's over-
coat. Please send description by
mail to Mrs. J. F. Breakey, 509 E.
Washington St.
FOUND-Corner of State and Williams
streets, gold watch. May be had oai
identiflcation and paying for ad at
1520 So. University.

With the coming of pleasant days,
many calls have come to the Y. M. C.
A. for students who wish odd jobe.
Men who desire to do odd jobs should
see Neal Ireland, '18L, at the "Y" em-
ployment bureau. His office hours are
7:30 to 8:30 o'clock in the morning,
12:30 to 1:30 in the afternoon, and 6:30
to 7:30 in the evening.
Students having Y. M. C. A. member-
ship receipts should turn them in at
the office and secure their membership
cards in exchange. Secretary Fetter
also states that there.is still a limited
supply- of freshman bibles on hand,
and any underclassman -who has not
already done so, may secure one by
calling at the "Y" office.
Freshmen and sophomore Bible
study classes met at the Y. M. C. A.
last night to arrange for a ten weeks
course. The freshmen will study
"The Manhood of the Master" under
the direction of Robert Monroe, '18,:
and the sophomores will study "Life
at Its Best" undet the direction of
Alex Crockett, '19.
Dance at Armory on best floor in
city. Saturday night.-Adv.

Forshee & Kuehnle
INVESTMENT SECURITIES
Phone 2169-J
412 1st Natl Bank Bldg.
Try our Chop Suey
Chinese and American Dishes
WAI KING LOO
Joe Gin, Prop.
314 S. State St. Phone 1244-M
Radio Military Fountain Pens
WdstWatches nWatermaa
$4.25 to $21 and ConKUa
U. of M. Jewelry
Schlanderer & Seyfried
We are right in the flower business
and know that our "mums" will be the
largest and best. Order yours now.
35s unitl Friday night. Arcade Floral
Shop. Phone600.-Adv.
Use the Daily classified columns.

. : -.

LISTEN!

There is going to be a
Shortage of Victrolas
before Christmas

M ke Your Sclection Early

EASY TERMS
GRINNELL ROS.
116 So. Main Street

We will deliver your
Victrola any timeyou,
say

.,.
+ '__ r.rii rr ir r u .r i.rnr..r .

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