100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 09, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-11-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

-IE WEATHER
ERALLY FAIR AND
WARMER

C r Ak~r~a

tt

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

JI

OL. XVIII. No. 34.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 1917.

PRICE THREE C

PRICE TTTREE(4

I-l

GRIP

o

1

11

11

I

T
YAR'S SNAPPIEST
STUDENT MEETING
SCHERMERHORN, SMITH, AND
TOWERS GIVE LIVELY PEP
SPEECHES

YSAYE LAST OF OLD
VIOLINISTS' SCHOOL
Program for Tonight's Concert In
Hill Auditorium
Announced

ITALIAN RETRET
STILL UNCHECKED

(WETS KEEP LEAg
IN OHIO VOTINGs

ELECT LITERARY
OFFICERS TODAY
All Classes Except Senior To Vote
Today on Election of
Candidates

RUSS GoYERNMEN1
FORCES SURRENDE
'WINTER PALAC
WORKMEN'S AND SOLDIERS' DE
EGATES ARE IN CONTROL
OF CITY

CROWD
CALL

TAKES CHARGE;
FOR FAVORITES

Band, Cheer Leaders, and Chairman
Aid in Making Meeting
Sucess
Michigan's last pep meeting was
marked by novelties.
Immediately after the program was
well under way the audience took
things in their own hands and from
then on proceeded to run the meeting
to suit themselves. Smith, Tuthill,
Sparks, Weston, Lambert, Boyd, and
Coach Douglass were forced to take
the platform and tell what they
thought about the coming game.
Several of the scheduled speakers
were unable to appear but those pres-
ent, assisted by James Schermerhorn,
Jr., '18, and the extemporaneous
speakers, made pup for anything that
might have been missing.
Poleske and Knowlson vied each
other in getting pep out of the crowd
and were well rewarded.
The band was present and aided
greatly the efforts of the crowd and
speakers in instilling pep into the
team for the coming battle. In addi-
tion to the usual college songs the
band played a selection at the begin-
ing of the program which was very
much appreciated by those present.
Shirley W. Smith, secretary of the
University, the faculty speaker for the
evening, was the first man to speak and
in his own unusual, but effective man-
her, gained the good graces of his au-
dience. Smith's original wit was well
received and his recital of a poem
quite new to the campus at the clos-j
ing was very stirring.
Walter K. Towers, '12L, spent a few
minutes complimenting the University
and comparing the present day with
the past. He then settled down to
the business at hand and told the team
and students just what was necessary
for them to do in order to make Sat-
urday a banner day for the institu-
tion.
James Schermerhorn, Jr., '18, was,
called by Waldo McKee, '18E, the pep-1
iest man on Michigan's campus since]
the days of Frank Murphy and his
speech did not show that he had less
than an hour to prepare for the occa-
sion. Schermerhorn's efforts were
confined to telling how to knock the
"L" out of Cornell and put the "again"
in Michigan.I
Waldo McKee, '18E, acted as chair-E
man of the evening and had a goodi
etory for every speaker.I
The committee which deserves cred-t
it for the success of the meeting was
composed of R. D. Smith, '19E; O. E.
Madison, grad., and J. W. Thomas
,'18L.c
Prof. A. E. Wood to Lecture in Detroits
Prof. A. E. Wood will give a series
of 20 lectures in Detroit this winter
on the general condition of Detroits
and just what can be done to betterc
those conditions.
The lectures will be given FridayE
evenings in the Temple Beth El.

The second pre-festival concert will
take place at 8 o'clock this evening in
Hill auditorium, when Eugene Ysaye,
the noted violinist, will appear.
Ysaye is the last of the old school
of violinists. For more than two
decades he has enjoyed unrivaled suc-
cess. Since 1886 he has toured every
music center in the world. He has
devoted his time exclusively to the
United States and. Canada since the
war began.
Ysaye was made chevalier of the
Legion of Honor in 1893, and is the
possessor of many decorations of hon-
ors.
The program will be as follows:
1 Suite in D. minor for vblin
and piano.............Geminian
I. Grave-Largo, Allegro glusto.
* II. Sarbande-Lento.
III. Poco vivace.
M. Eugene Ysaye and Miss Victoria
Boshko.
2. Sonata op. 47 in A major for
violin and piano (Kreutzer
Sonata)........L. von Beethoven.

TOTAL OF PRISONERS TAKEN
BY HUNS NUMBERS 250,000
British Gain Ground in Offensive
Against Turkish Troops in
Palestine
Italian Headquarters in Italy, Nov.
8.-The bulk of the Austro-German
invading forces today presents a main
frontage of about 35 miles back of
and along the Tagliamento river, with
reconnaisance frontage thrust forward
eight or ten miles west of the river,
for the purpose of stealing for the
points of least resistance. This is pro-
ducing detached engagements but no
battle in force has yet occurred.
The Livenza river to which the Ital-
ian withdrawal is now progressing is
only one of a series of successive
parallels. The Italian army still has
in reserve large bodies of troops
which, however, naturally feel the ef-
fect produced by the recent retirement
of their main body.
Large re-enforcements at this mom-
ent therefore would render invaluable
assistance in the opinion of the milit-
ary authorities.

LARGE COUNTIES ARE NOT
INCLUDED IN RETURNS
If Defeated Drys will Try To Swing
State Election Next
Year
Cincinnati, Nov. 8.--At the end of
two days following the prohibition
election in Ohio the result of whether
citizens will be subjected to a wet or
a dry state was still in doubt, but
with complete returns from the 88
counties, 67 of which. had turned in
official reports, the wets were leading
by a majority of 3,643 on the face of
the returns.
The fact that none of the large
counties of the state were represent-
ed by the 67 which have made official
returns, and that the wets have an
apparent lead of 3,643 brought broad
smiles to the anti-prohibitionists, but
the drys are still claiming victory.
Officials of the prohibition movement
announced today that in case of de-
feat they would try it again next year.
FIRST ISSUE OF INLANDER
TO APPEAR NOVEMBER 2'

Austro-German Invaders Lie Along Have
Tagliamento River Ready for
Advance

Majority of 3,643 Counts
Official Reports of 67
Counties

In

Junior, sophomore, and freshman
literary classes will hold elections to-
day. Senior elections are postponed
until further notice.
The nominations for the junior lit
class are as follows: president, F. C.
Bell and Joseph H. Broderick; vice-
president, Ada C. Arnold and Frances
Macdonald; secretary, Anna MacMa-
hon and Jennie A. Duemling; treas-
urer, Gerald F. Nye; oratorical dele-
gate, Vera Andrus and William J.
Kennick; student councilman, James
McClintock.
The nominations for the sophomore
class are: president, D. A. Forbes and
R. I. Manwaring; vice-president, Bea-
trice M. Hagens and Elsie L. Erley;
secretary, Mildred D. Potter and Mar-
guerite Chapin; treasurer, C. B. Steg-
ner and C. W. Stoll; oratorical dele-
gate, R. A. Forsyth and H. G. Selby;
women's oratorical delegate, Jessie L.
Metcalf and Dorothy D. Williams.
Freshman nominations are: presi-
dent, Roy E. Lounsbury and Fred J.
Petty; vice-president, Dorothy Snow
and dorothy Herrimann; secretary,
Eleanor G. Crabb and Elinor D. Leo-
nard; treasurer, Lee M. Woodruff and
Ferdinand Schernm; oratorical dele-
gate, Wesley L. Nutten and Albert C.
Jacobs; women's oratorical delegate,
Geraldine Brasie and Margaret Mc-
Donald.
WOMEN BACK OF MEN
IN TAXI CONTROVERSY
COUNCILMAN ADVISES STUDENTS
TO APPEAR AT COUNCIL
SESSION

i

KERENSKY HAS GONE
TO FRONT.-IS REPORT
Revolutionary Troops Endeavor to
Protect Citizens From In-
jury

I. Adagio sostenuto-presto.
II. Andante con variazioni.
III. Finale-Presto.
M. Eugene Ysaye and Miss Victoria
Boshko
3. Concerto in D minor, No. 2
op. 22 ............ H. Wieniawski
I. Allegro moderato.
II. Romance: Andante non troppo.
III. Allegro moderato.
M. Eugene Ysaye.
4. Piano soli:
a. Barcarolle in A minor
.. Rubinstein.
b. Rhapsodie No. 2........Liszt.
Miss Victoria Boshko.
5. a. Reva d' Enfant......E. Ysaye.
b. Waltz in E minor. Chopin-Ysaye
c. Ballade and Polonaise
.............. .... Vieuxtemps.
M. Eugene Ysaye.
Tickets may be secured at the
School of Music, or at the box office in
Hill auditorium before the concert.
WOMEN'S CONFERENCE
OPENS ANNUAL SESSION
HOLD MEETING IN SARAH CAS-
WELL A NGELL
HALL
Women should be trained specifi-
cally for the work they are expected
to do. This point was emphasized by
Miss Helen Bennett, of the collegiate
bureau of occupations at the opening
session of the vocational conference
at Sarah Caswell Angell hall yester-
day afternoon.
Many lines of work are suffering
for lack of competent women, Miss
Bennett said, especially is this true of
social service and household econo-
mics. Girls are urged to finish col-
lege because it is the trained minds
that are in demand.
Mrs. Lucinda Prince of Boston,
who originated the school for sales
girls, now affiliated with the Simmons
college, laid particular stress on the
need of specialized education for
women in business.
War Supper Served 250
At six o'clock a war supper was
served to about 250 people. Between
courses short talks on * the general
subject of vocational trainingwere
given by Miss Karoline Klager, who
(Continued on Page Six)

(By Associated Press)
There has been no cessation in the
retreat of the Italians across the Ven-
etian plains towards the new line of
defense on which is proposed to stand
and face the invading Germans and
Austro-Hungarians. The larger units
of the Italians are falling back without
molestation, according to the Rome
official communication, but consider-
able fighting has taken place in the
hills of Vittorio and at other points
in the north. The Berlin war office
says that on the Tagliamento river
Italian troops who were still holding
out against the invaders were captur-
ed.
A general and 17,000 Italian troops
are reported to have been captured,
bringing the total prisoners since the
retreat from the Isonzo began, to mor
than 250,000, according to Berlin. It
is asserted also that more than 2,300
guns have fallen in the hands of the
Teutonic allies.
Along the line in France and Belg-
ium only artillery duels and raiding
operations by the French and British
forces are taking place. Additional
ground has been gained by the Brit-
ish troops against the Turks in Pales-
tine and along the Tigris river.
Hollanders To Have Spectacles
The Hague, Netherlands, Oct. 30. (By
Mail).-All machine-gun sections of
infantry, hussars, and fortress artil-
lery of the Netherlands army will be
supplied with steel spectacles as a
protection against splinters of pro-
jectiles, flying chips of stone and the
like.

The first issue of the Inlander will
be out Nov. 22. It is most imperi-
tive that all manuscripts be in by the
end of this week.
The staff appointments so far are as
follows: Managing editor, Marion
Holden, '18; literary editor, Lucile
Quarry, '18; associate editors, Kather-
ine Harrington, '18; Rebecca Green-
berg, '19; Margaret Cooley, '18; Kelsey
Guilfoil, '20L; Emily Mack, '19; Ingle
Whinery, Grad.; Hugh Roger Thomas,
'18, and Gladys Goshorn, '19, and as-
sistant editors, Catherine Connell, '.18;
Grace Dana, '18; Marcia Pinkerton,
'19; Helen Davis, '19; Marian Heide-
man, '17; Margaret Benedict, '20 and
Kathleen Teer, '20.
Poems, essays, and stories are de-
sired and should be sent with a stamp.
ed, self addressed envelope to the
managing editor, Press building.
Fire Causes Damage at Nurses' Home
Damage to the amount of $2,000 was
the result of a fire at the nurses' home
at midnight last night. The blaze was
the result of sparks from the chim-
ney. About 25 of the nurses were in
the house when the blaze was dis-
covered and after an ineffectual at-
tempt to fight the flames the city fire
department was summoned. The en-
tire attic of the building was gutted
by the flames.
Sophomore Medics Elect Officers
The sophomore medical class has
elected the following officers: .presi-1
dent, N. F. Miller; vice-president, C.
R. Smith; secretary, H. R. Moore;
treasurer, Joseph A. Kervin.

"University women will undoubtedly
stand with the men against an in-
crease in taxicab rates." This state-
ment was made by Anna Lloyd, '18,
president of the Women's league, after
a meeting of the judiciary council of
that body in which the proposed in-
crease was discussed. "Members of
the council are unanimous in the be-
lief that University girls will support
the men in resisting the exorbitant
charges of taxicab companies. In
view of the extreme need for economy
in everything, they are certain that
girls are more than willing to walk
to evening functions.
"Taxi rates are high enough for
the quality of the service the com-
panies give," is the opinion of Eilene
Lamb, '18, president of Newberry res-
idence. Helen Bourke, '18, president
of the Y. W. C. A., makes the follow-
ing statement: "Higher rates will cer-
tainly not meet with the approval of
University girls and I would rather
walk than pay the increase." Clarissa

Petrograd, Nov. 8. -- Government
forces holding the winter palace were
compelled to capitulate early this aft-
ernoon under the fire of the cruiser
Aurora and the cannon of the St.
Peter and St. Paul fortress across th
Neva river. At 2 o'clock this morning
the women's battalion which had been
defending the winter palace surrender-
ed. The workmen's and soldiers' del-
egates are in complete control of the
city.
Prernier Kenensky was reported last
night at the Luga, 85 miles southwest
of Petrograd. Late yesterday evening
after the government forces had been
driven into the winter palace, the pal-
ace was besieged and a lively fire of
machine guns and rifles began.
The cruiser Aurorawhich was moor-
ed at the Nicolai bridge moved up
within range, firing shrapnel. Mean-
while the guns of the St. Peter and St.
Paul fortress opened fire.
Offers Good Target
The palace stood out under the glare
of the search lights of the cruiser and
offered a good target for the guns.
The defenders held out for four hours,
replying as best they could with ma-
chine guns and rifles.
There was spasmodic firing in other
parts of the city but the workmen's
and soldiers' troops took every means
to protect the citizens. The bridges
in the Nevsky Prospect which early -
in the afternoon were in the hands of
the government forces, were captured
and held during the night by the work-
men's and soldiers' troops.
Battle Spectacular One
The battle at the palace which be-
gan shortly after six o'clock was a
spectacular one. Armed cars of the
revolutionaries swung into action in
front of the palace gates, while flashes
from the Neva were followed by the
explosions of the shells from the guns
of the Aurora.
Petrograd, Nov. 8.-The general con-
gress of workmen's and soldiers' del-
egates of all Russia was convened here
last night. The chairman declared that
the time was not propitious for polit-
ical speeches and the order of busi-
ness of the congress approved was as
follows:
First, organization of power. Sec-
ond, peace and war. Third, a consti-
tuent assembly.
The officers elected comprise 14
Maximalists, including Nikolai Lenine,
the radical socialist leader and Leon
Trotzky, president of the central ex-
ecutive committee of the Petrograd
council of workmen's and soldiers'
delegates. In addition seven revolu-
tionary socialists were appointed.
Peace Delegation
A delegation was named to initiate
peace negotiations with the other rev-
olutionary and democratic organiza-
tions "with a view to taking steps to
stop bloodshed."
(Continued on Page Six)

Notice to Daily Subscribers
All unpaid subscriptions must be paid by Noon
Saturday, Nov. 10th, or $3.00 rate will be
charged. If the subscription is not paid by the
15th the paper will be stopped and a charge
made for time run.

I

Vyn, '18, president of the Women's
athletic association, says, "I am sure
the women in general agree that there
should be no increase."
Students Should Complain To Council
One member of the council, who
seems to:think that the students
should complain before the council
session next week if they think they
have been unjustly treated, has sug-
gested that the vehicle ordinance
which bears on the situation be pub-
lished.
"This will," he said, "give the Uni-
versity an opportunity to show they.
have been gouged in the past, if they
(Continued on Page Six)

,, i

I

! _ _I

I

ON SALE THIS NOON

Price
25c

MICHIGAN

- CORNELL

Price
25c

SOUVENIR PROGRAM'
CCNTAINING PICTURES AND DOPE ON THIS YEAR'S CHAMPIONS

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan