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November 08, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-11-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WEATHER
ENERALLY FAIR AND
WARIMER

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ASSOCIAT
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT
SERVICE

KYAT V' YTt YT wt_ A9

i. .&VII. No. 33

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 1917.

PRICE THREE C

PRTCFa TTTii1l 1

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11

In

RUMNEY TO TAKEN
AT EPMETN
OTHER SPEAKERS WILL BE TRE.
SENT; WALDO MCKEE TO
BE CHAIRMAN
SECRETA1RY) SMITH IS
FACULTY SPEAKER

Vulcans Choose
Ten New lMen
Vulcans, honorary senior engineer-
ing society, held its fall initiation yes-
terday. From 4:30 o'clock in the aft-
ternoon until 6:30 o'clock, 10 initiates
demonstrated their fitness to be taken-
into the organization by pounding the
anvils in front of the engineering
shops.

OHIO IN DOUBT ON
PROHIBITIOIN VDTE
Districts Yet To Be Heard From
Formerly Favored
Drys
FUSIONISTS ELECT THEIR
CANDIDATES IN CHICAGO
Women Citizens of New York Gain
Unlimited Suffrage B) Big
Majority

CHiCAGO FACULTY
VOTES DOWN SAME
Windy City Board In Control Holds
To Policy Against Post-
Season Games
MICHIGAN PLAYERS EXPRESS
REGRET AT CHICAGO ACTION

Pi Delta Epsilon
Ito Welcome Cubs
Fresh from the reportorial rooms
and the composing room, attired in
black derbies decorated with ribbons
of green and gray, crying-their latest
editions and hunting for news, initiates
of Pi Delta Epsilon, upperclass na-
tional honorary journalism fraternity,
will make their appearance on State

WILL REPRESENT
UNITED STATES 11
616 CONEE

Committee
Cheer

Asks Everyone Attend;
Leaders Will Assist
Yelling

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PEP MEETING PROGRAM
"The Victors" by the band.
Addresses by:
Mason P. Rumney
Shirley W. Smith
Selection by the Band
Addresses by:
Walter K. Towers
Oscar C. Carpell
"Yellow and Blue"

.gr
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A banquet at the Renellen Hospice
afforded the grand finale for the oc-
casion. With J. D. Hibbard acting as
toastmaster, the following program
was given: "Welcome," by Waldo M.
McKee; "Illuminating Thoughts," by
Prof. H. H. Higbie; "Beyond the Elas-
tic Limit," by Mr. J. H. Cissell; and
"First Over the Top," by H. A. Knowl-
son.
The initiates were: Phil Carroll, W.
S. Dinwiddie, R. C. Germanson, C. E.
Gormsen, H. A. Knowlson, F. J. Kor-
tick, R. M. Langley, C. R. Sabin, M.
L. Thoms, and A. B. Weston.
'Y READY TO STARDT WAR
CAMPAIGN FOR, $26,000
TWO HUNDRED MEN SIGN UP FOR
WOIK ON FRIENDSHIP
FUND DRIVE
Final arrangements were completed
at a meeting of the team captains and
solicitors of the Friendship war fund,
held in Lane hall last night for the
-drive which opens Nov. 14.

* * * * * * * * * * *'*

t

Michigan Alumni Responsible
Starting Movement For
Contest
That the Chicago faculty has

For I street this afternoon.

*

Mason F. Rumney, '08E, Varsity foot-
ball man in '06 and '07, agreed at a
late hour yesterday to take the place of
Fred Lawton, '97M, who was scheduled
to speak atthe pep meeting to be held
at promptly 7 o'clock =this evening at
Hill auditorium.
Owing to business Lawton was un-
able to be present.
All of the other speakers will be pre-
sent as scheduled. Waldo McKee, '18E,
will act as chairman of the evening
and will introduce the following speak-
ers: Secretary Shirley W. Smith,
speaker for the faculty; Walter K.
Towers, '12L; Mason P. Rumney, '08E,
and Oscar Carpell, member of the 1911
football team.
Seating arrangements for the eve-
ning will be the same as at the other
pep meetings this *fall. All men pre-
senting athletic books will be admitted
to the main floor. The first balcony
will be reserved for women only and.
the third balcony will be open to
everyone.'
Poleski and Knowlson, Michigan's
cheer leaders, best pep inspirers on
the campus will be present early to
lead the students in cheering.
The committee in charge is asking
the student body to make this mass
meeting the best of the season because
it is not only the last but the one be-
fore the big home game of the sea-
son.
Men who have been working on the
program are: R. D. Smith, '19E, 0. E
Madison, grad., and J. W. Thomas,
'18L.'
EDITORIALS SHOULD BE SHORT
AND ATTRACTIVE, SAYS L. SMITS
That editorials should be short and
should be written entirely from the
view promulgated by Lee J. Srts,
editorial writer on the Detroit News,
in a lecture yesterday afternoon be-
fore students of Journalism. The talk
was the second of a series of four.
Mr. Smits emphasized his point by1
comparing editorials to advertise-
ments and by pointing to the policies
adopted by various prominent news-{
papers.
Mr. Smits' next talk will be giveni
at 3 o'clock Friday in room 102, West,
hallI

Nearly 200 men signed for active
work in soliciting and campaign man-
agement. Women will also be as-
signed to canvass in the various hous-
es and organizations. .-
The University is expected to raise
more than $25,000. This amount was
pledged at a meeting of the state col-
lege representatives recently, as Mich-
igan's share of the million dollar
drive.
"We have as good a machine as can
be found in any of the universities
for our war fund campaign," declared
Mr. N. C. Fetter, executive chairman
of the effort. "The men in the work
have promised their support to the
last ditch and we expect that with
work Michigan will fill her quota."
Some have asked what the money
will be used for, and the following
statement has been issued by Mr. Fet-
ter explaining the scope and purpose
of the loan.
"The qities and the Y. M. C. A.'s of
the United States are starting a $35,-
000,000 drive for a war relief fund for
soldiers, both at home and abroad.
The universities of the nation have
taken $1,000,000 as their allotment
and Michigan's share is $25,000, which
was promised at a meeting of the col-
lege representatives of Michigan at
Camp Custer several weeks ago. The
money will be spent for comforts for
the Americans in France and in the
prison camps of Germany, as well as
for the soldiers of other nations in the
battle fronts anid in our cantonments."
Services of the Y. M. C. A. for
soldiers may be estimated in a small
measure by the extent of the work in
Camp Custer. The Y. M. C. A. fur-
nished 96,000 sheets of paper for the
boys to write home last Sunday.; Dur-
ing the month of September the as-
sociation handled $15,000 worth of
money orders, the secretaries acting
as agents for the express companies.
One day in one of the buildings alone,
the total weight of parcels post pack-
ages was 2,812 pounds.

Cincinnati; Ohio, Nov. 7.-The fate
of the prohibition amendment in Ohio
remained in doubt early tonight and
even the most expert political observ-
ers were loath to make a prediction, so
close was the vote.
With only 150 precincts remaining
unheard from, the wets were leading
by 2,277, the vote standing for pro-
hibition, 504,874; against, 507,151.
The majority of the precincts still to
come are from districts which in the
two previous elections leaned heavily
to the dry side.
Early this afternoon, when the dry
forces had an apparent majority of
1,000 votes, a sensational disclosure
of a mistake alleged to have been
made in the Hamilton county tabu-
lation swung the majority over to the
wets. Anti-prohibition managers de-
clared discovery of the error added
10,000 votes to their total.
Fusionists Win In Cht cago
Chicago, Nov. 7.-Democrats and
Republicans in Chicago and Cook
county today expressed gratification at
the results of the judicial election yes-
terday, in which a fusion ticket car-
rying seven candidates from each of
these parties was swept into office ov-
er Socialist and independent tickets
by a plurality of approximately 75,-
000 out of a total vote of 244,913.
- In the contest for superior court
judges, Seymour Stedman polled the
largest Socialist vote, receiving 72,117.
M. L. McKinley led the fusionists with
a total of 140,074. The Socialists- car-
ried six out of the 35 wards in Chica-
go. In several districts heavily popu-
lated by persons of German birth the
vote was overwhelmingly for the bi-
partisan candidates and in other Ger-
man-American sections the Socialists
received a plurality.
Empire Women Given Vote
New York, Nov. 7.-The women
citizens of New York were given un-
limited suffrage in yesterday's elec-
tion by a majority which is expected
to reach 100,000 when all election
districts have completed their tab-
ulations. Early today, with 1,348 out
of 5,772 election districts missing, the
vote stood 553,519 for the amend-
ment and 446,791 against.
Tammany Reigns Again In Gotham
New York, Nov. 7.-Tammany hall
returned to power as the result of
yesterday's mayorality election. Not
only was JudgetJohnrF. Hylan swept
into office by the largest plurality
ever given a mayorality candidate
(Continued on Page Six)

de- I

nied the permission necessary to the,
scheduling of the proposed Michigan-
Chicago football game, was the sub-
stance of a report received in Ann Ar-
bor last night.
According to the dispatch received,
the board in control of athletics, at the
Windy City institution decided that
Chicago football team would not be
permitted to disregard the policy set
down in years past and play a post-
season game.
Prof. Ralph W. Aigler, chairman of
the Michigan Board in Control of Ath-
letics, declared last night that he was
sorry the game could not be played,
but he felt the Chicago faculty was
but acting in accordance with a long-
standing standard which has opposed
all games after the regular grid sea-
son had ended.
"I feel that the Chicago faculty are
not taking any steps against Michigan
personally in this,," said Professor
Aigler. "The Chicago institution has
always opposed post-season games,
and the alumni of both schools in pro-
posing this game were bucking ancient
antagonism to such contests."
Members of the Michigan football
team seen last night expressed regret
that the game could not be played.
E. E. Wieman, '19, and G. W. Boyd,
'18, who have been acting as captain,
in the absence of captain-elect Smith,
said they were sorry they could not
play Stagg's. eleven.
C. M. Sparks, 19E, Michigan half
and quarterback, expressed a similar
regret at the action. "I feel that the
game might have been played con-
sidering the fact that the proceeds
were to go to war charity," said
Sparks. R. F. Weske, '18E, right
tackle, was of the same opinion.
The Michigan and Chicago alumni
started work several weeks ago to se-
cure the Maroon-Wolverine game for
Dec. 1. For a time it seemed as though
their efforts would succeed, for the
force of public opinion behind the
Thomason, '04, chairman of the Michi-
gan alumni in Chicago, was in Ann-
Arbor last week and declared that,
according to all reports, the game'
would be played
The conference, with the exception
of Purdue, had voted to allow the
game, and the vote from this school
had been delayed. Michigan will not
be forced to wait until 1918 before
resuming football relationship with
Chicago.

VOATIONAL CONFEREN CE
OPENS WITH* FOUR TALKS
INTERVIEWS WITH SPEAKERS.
MAY BE HAD BY WOMEN
INTERESTED
The Vocational conference will
open this afternoon with an intensive
program consisting of four talks and
a supper served by the Women's
league. In addition to the regular
features, private interviews with the
speakers may be had by women inter-
ested in any particular vocation.
The first address of the confercne
will be held at 4 o'clock when Miss
Helen Bennett of Chicago, will ex-
plain the meaning and purposes of the
Collegiate Bureau of Occupations. Im-
mediately following this talk, Mrs.
Lucindia Prince of Simmons college,
Boston, will discuss the problems con-
fronting women salesmen.
At 6 o'clock a supper will be served.
A nominal price of 25 cents will be
charged for which an elaborate menu,
planned by Mrs. John Waite, will be
offered. The meal will be a strictly
war character, and will consist of fish,
vegetables, and graham biscuits in-
stead of meats and wheat bread.
The conference will again go into
session at 7:45 o'clock when Miss
Georgia White, Dean of Women at M.
A. C., will deliver an address on "Wom-
en and the War." The day's proceed-
ings will end with a discussion of the
Smith-Hughes Bill by Fred Keeler of
Lansing, Mich.,
Hours set aside for private inter-
views are 9 to 11:30 o'clock and 2 to 4j
o'clock on Thursday and Friday inI
Barbour gymnasium.t
Tomorrow's program is as follows:l
"Government Service," by Miss Karo-1
line Klager, Washington, D. C.c
"Religious Education," by Miss Gert-l
rude Hill, Chicago, ILll.
These lectures will start at 4 o'clock.
WYVERN HONORARY SOCIETY IN-
ITIATES SEVEN NEW MEMBERSt
Wyvern junior honorary society for
women, held its fall initiation at thel
home of Dean Myra Jordan, at 4 o'-
clock yesterday afternoon.
After the initiation service, Dean
Jordan spoke to the new membersr
concerning the purpose and ideals ofr
Wyvern.
The initiates were: Blanche Good-
ell, Hester Reed, Phyllis Egglestone,t
Gertrude Gunn, Helen Osbond, Jeant
Maclennan, and Ida Belle Guthe.
Prof. W. A. Frayer to Speak Friday
Prof. W. A. Frayer will speak on
"Democracy vs. Autocracy" tomorrowf
night in Grand Haven, Mich.

Washington, Nov. 7.-An Amercian
mission landed in England today on
the eve of the first great war con-
ference in which the United States will
participate.
Colonel Edward M. House, President
Wilson's personal friend and adviser,
is the officially designated representa-
tive of the United States. He is ac-
companying a staff representing every
war agency in the United States, in-
cluding Admiral Benson, chief of naval
operations, and General Bliss, chief
of the staff of the army.
Announcement by Secretary Lansin.;
tonight of the arrival of the party at
at a British port released American
newspapers from a pledge of silence
as to the .personnel of the mission
and its importance. The place and date *
of the conference has not been made
public, although the understanding
here is that the sessions are about to
begin.
To Be Only War Conference
In a statement accompanying his
announcement, Secretary Lansing em-
phasized the fact that the gathering
is to .be a war conference and noth-
ing else, charged with mapping out a
plan of campaign against Germany to
bring "the conflict to a speedy and
satisfactory end."
There have been many indications
that the conference was called at the
request of the United States. In select-
ing its representatives the United
States has provided in advance against
becoming involved in any discussions
of peace terms or political questions.
There is no diplomatic representative
with the mission Secretary Lansing in
his announcement said: "While a de-
finite program has not been adopted it
may be assumed that the subject to be
discussed will embrace not only those
pertaining to military and naval opera-
tiohs, but also the financial, commer-
cial, economic and other phases of the
present situation which are of vital
importance to the successful prosecu-
tion of the war.
Co-operation, the Motto
Undoubtedly an effort will be made
to avoid any conflict of interests among
the participants, and there is every
reason to anticipate that the result will
be full co-operation and consequently
a much higher efficiency and a more
vigorous presecution of the war.
The United States, in the employ-
ment of its man power and material
resources, intends to use them to the
greatest advantage against Germany.
The situation pictured by the secre-
tary shows that the real purpose of
the conference is to create in effect
a great general staff to co-ordinate and
direct the energies of the co-belliger-
ents.
The whole fighting forces of three-
fourths of the world is to be welded
into one mighty war making machine.

After giving the public a prolonged
demonstration of their abilities, the
neophytes will hurry to the society
rooms in the Press building to make
the 5 o'clock dead-line.

STAFF INCLUDES MEMBERS FR
EVERY WAR AGENCY IN
COUNTRY
UNION WILL USE FULL
FORCE FIGHTING HUS
Pla to Weld Three-Fourths of I
World's Forces Into One War
Machine

Notice to Day Subscribers
All unpaid subscriptions must be paid by Noon
Saturday, Nov. 10th, or $3.00 rate will be
charged. If the subscription is not paid by the
15th the paper will be stopped and a charge
made for time run.

i m am
U_

On

THE OFFICIAL ATHLETIC PROGRAM

On

Sale

Friday

MICHIGAN - CORNELL
SOUVENIR

Sale

Friday
Noon

Brighter and Snappier Than Ever

PRICE 25 CENTS

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