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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 07, 1917 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-11-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

I Season of Good Things
At this time o fthe year, with other Good Things in abund-
ce, how about YOUR CLOTHES?
Why don't you get ready for the holidays? An all-wool
t or overcoat, individually cut and hand-tailored to your
lividual measure, will be both sensible and seasonable and
11 give you something GOOD for the HOLIDAYS.,
Order now while our showing is complete, and have that
t or overcoat in time for THANKSGIVING.

DRESS SUITS FOR HIRE

. K. Aalcolm
604 E. Liberty Street

i

FULPER
The Pottery of Exclusive Design and Exquisite Colorings.
A complete line at the
Arcade. Floral Shop

Arcade

Phone 600

ARCADE JEWELER

Phone 152-W

NICKELS ARCADE

ENGLAND10,FIGHTING
FOR 5ECURITY OF
EUROPE - BALFOUR
COUNTRY IS READY TO CONTINUE
ITS GREAT SACRI-
FICE S
THINKS DISCUSSIONS
ARE OF LITTLE USE
Opposition Claims That Original War
Aims Have Been Extended By
Later Agreements
London, Nov. 6.-A. J. Balfour, sec-
retary for foreign affairs, replying in
the house of commons today to a
peace motion proposed by H. B. Lees-
Smith, lord member for Northampton,
declared: "The aims for which Great
Britain entered the war were not, or
are not imperialistic, or vindictive,
but one and all are needed for the
double purpose of the emancipation
and security of Europe."
Mr. Balfour asked the house to show
by an overwhelming majority that
"we believe in the cause in which we
are struggling and which we know we
can bring to a successful termina-
tion. Great as are the sacrifices al-
ready made, we are ready to continue
them, and 'continue them indefinitely
until the great, righteous and un-
selfish object we have in view is se-
cured.
Andrew Bonar Law, chancellor of
the exchequer, amid loud cheers, mov-
ed closure which was carried 282 to 33.
Mr. Lees-Smith's motion was then neg-
atived without division.
In the course of his remarks, Mr.
Balfour expressed the opinion that dis-
cussions of this kind did little to as-
sist the object that those who started
them had in view-the attainment of
an honorable peace at the earliest pos-
sible date. He ridiculed the idea that
secret treaties existed as suggested by
Mr. Lees-Smith and declared that
Great Britain was not a party to any
such treaty. He did not believe any
such treaty existed.
"It never was and is not the object
of the allies to take from the German
empire admittedly German territory,"
said Mr. Balfour, "but of couse the
allies desire the restoration of Alsace-
Lorraine to France. The allies," contin-
ued the secretary, "are not fighting
for that alone, or as an isolated ob-
ject for their war aims.
"We are fighting in the first place,"
said he, "that Europe might be free
from the perpetual menace of the mil-
itary party in Germany."
Mr. Lees-Smith is moving his resolu-
tion maintained that successive secret
agreements between the allies had car-
ried their war aims far beyond their
original aims. He declared that the
recent rumor which asserted in addi-
tion to losing Alsace-Lorraine, Ger-
many was to be deprived of terirtory
on the left bank of the Rhine, had
been confirmed in secret session of
the French chamber by M. Ribot.
CITY NEWS
Representing Ann Arbor in Russia,
Mr. Frank L. Olmstead of this city,
has been stationed in one of the army
Y. M. C. A. camps that have been es-

tablished in that country and for whose
maintenance $3,000,000 of the huge1
$35,000,000 Y. M. C. A. fund is toj
be appropriated.
Arrested upon leaving an interur-
ban car on a charge of forgery, Wil-
liam Boyke was lodged Monday night
in the county jail but released yester-
day when he settled up with the party
he had defrauded.

WHAtS GOIG ON
TODAY
10:30 o'clock-Harold Titus speaks
o students of journalism in )room 102,
Vest hall.
3 o'clock-Lee Smits speaks to stu-
ents of journalism in room 102, West
al.
6:45 o'clock-"Y" Friendship cam-
aign workers meet in Lane hall.
7:30 o'clock-Forestry club meets in
oom 213, Natural Science building.
8 o'clock-.Quadrangle club meets in
uadrangle rooms.
TOMORROW
7 o'clock- Prof. I. L. Sharfman
peaks to University Zionist society in
oom P-162, Natural Science building.
7:30 o'clock-Round-Up club smok-
r at the Michigan Union.
U-NOTICES
Senior civil engineers and Camp
)avis men will meet at 7:30 o'clock
Chursday night at the Michigan Union.
Wl are requested to bring their song
ooks with them.
The Varsity band will rehearse at 7
'clock tonight in University hall.
Subscribe ;for the Michigan Daily.

MICHIGAN NAVAL MEN WIN
COMMISSIONS AT GREAT LAKES
Members of Ann Arbor, Unit 'lNow in
Service at United States Rifle
Range, Wakefield, Mass.
Walter M. Simpson, '20, Curtis O.
Thompson, '19, Lester L. Thompson,
'19, and George Gilmore, members of
the Michigan Naval militia, who left
Ann Arbor for the Great Lakes train-
ing camp last spring, have received
commissions as gunner's mates, and
are now located at the United States
rifle range in Wakefield, Mass.
Simpson has charge of the expert-
rifleman course, C. Thompson and L.
Thompson are in charge of the marks-
man run and the sharpshooter course,
respectively, and Gilmore is chief of
the machine guns.
Members of the Michigan naval unit
were sent to Massachusetts during .the
latter part of the summer, and from
Wakefield they have been distributed
throughout all parts of the East, con-
ducting naval rifle ranges. Some are
at Virginia Beach, Va., Charleston, S.
C., and Cape May, N. J. Other groups
are to be stationed in Maryland and at
Philadelphia.

"Y,, NEEDS MONEY FOR
COMFORT OF SAMIS
CAPTURED AMERICANS MUST BE
SUPPLIED BY COUNTRY-
MEN
Because of the recent capture of
12 Sammies by Germans, the Friend-
ship War fund campaigners in the
colleges and cities throughout the ha-
tion are speeding up their canvasses
with the hope of lending all possible
aid to Conrad Hoffmann, Y. M. C. A.
war worker in German prison camps.
"The University quota of $25,000
will be attacked with all possibl 'vig-
or," declared Mr. N. C. Fetter, chair-
man of the campaign. "The casualty
lists and roster of our soldiers in.the
barbed-wire enclosures of Germany
will bring home the realization of the
seriousness"of the work for war funds
and give us co-operation, I am sure,"
continued Mr. Fetter.
The Y. M. C. A. is now the only
line of communication between the
Americans in German camps and their
relatives in this country, because the
Boche authorities will recognize no
other American institution. Owing to
recent adjustments, it is now possible
for letters and packages-to be sent to
Yankee captives.
"The wire-torn and muddied cloth-
ing of the Americans must be sup-
planted by warm overcoats and other
clothing for winter, and it is for this
purpose that students are asked to
consider their fellow's comfort and
contribute to this cause," declared Mr.
Francis Bacon, '02, in discussing the
campaign in Michigan. "Here is a
wonderful chance for University stu-
dents to directly aid these sufferers,
many of them formerly in colleges and
universities."
At a meeting of the committee to
be held at 6:45 o'clock Wednesday in
the Lane hall, the team captains and
their solicitors will discuss final or-
ganization plans for the drive. Mr.
Bacon will speak on Michigan's part
in the million dollar Friendship war
fund campaign. The meeting is for
men only. Every Michigan man in-
terested in the work of the Y. M. C. A.
in camps and cantonments is urged to
attend.
One hundred prominent Detroiters
will go to Camp Custer Friday to
gain first hand information on army
Y. M. C. A. work. They will be enter-
tained and shown through the camp
by field secretaries of the "Y."
A typical day in camp has been ar-
ranged in detail for the visitors and
they will learn from direct observa-
tion how army Y. M. C. A. work in all
its departments of cantonment ser-
vice is carried on.
The party is a detail in the army
"Y" fund drive that is now in progress
throughout the country.
NEW AUTOMOBILE APPARATUS
ADDED TO FIRE DEPARTMENT
Tests of the new automobile com-
bination engine-hose truck added to
Ann Arbor's fire equipment last week,
have been made and have proven the
machine highly satisfactory. Mr. W.
F. Aitken, a mechanic employed by the
American Le France company, manu-
facturers of the truck, is in the city
to demonstrate the machine and to
instruct new drivers.-
This new apparatus makes the fire
department a "horseless" one. The
two horses now used by the depart-

ment will soon be turned out and
their stables converted into a garage.
An appropriation of $600 was made by
the city council for this purpose but
repairs are being held up for the pres-
ent because the amount has been found
to be insufficient for the total repairs
needed.
The new engine contains 1,500 feet
of hose and has a pumping capacity
of 800 gallons.
C. J. Sullivan Heads '19 Architects
The junior architects at a recent
election of officers chose the following:
President, Charles 3. Sullivan; vice-
president, Delight Sweeney; secretary,
S. G. Wiener; treasurer, L. S. Martz;
sergeant-at-arms, F. J. Zoellin.
For Cornell-Michigan game, special
noon-day luncheon at 75c. Delta Cafe.
--Adv.

Riding Breeches
Golf Suits
Uniforms

Text-Books and Supplies
For all Courses
WE SUPPLY EVERY STUDENTS' NEED
Sheehan & Co.
Ann Arbor Detroit

r
SAMMIES_' MAIL
RULES ANNOUNCED
Christmas Pareels Must Conform To
Regulations and Be
Mailed Early

SEE

U. S.

I

When in the market for Lum-
ber, Sash, Doors, Interior
Finish, Office Fixtures, and
Special Mill work.

D. E. GRENNAN
REAL CUSTOM TAILORING

In anticipation of considerable con-
fusion in the mailing of Christmas
parcels to the American soldiers
abroad, the post office department,
through Mr. Otto Praeger, second-as-
sistant-postmaster-general, has issued
rules for the guidance of those who
will send gifts to France.
wThe last mall for the front will be
collected not later than Nov. 30. Ev-
ery effort will be made to get pack-
agts mailed on time to the boys in
their respective camps, but no promis-
es of delivery will be made if mailed
after that date.
All packages should be wrapped in
paper heavy enough to withstand con-
siderable pressure, and then should
be well bound. Such things as candy
or cake should be placed in containers
of tin or some equally resistant ma-
terial, which in turn should be tightly
bound.
One side of the package should be
reserved for the address of sender and
recipient. The latter's company, regi-
ment, or organization should be plain-
ly written, followed by the words
"American Expeditionary Force." Ev-
ery parcel should be labeled with tht
inscription, "Christmas Mail."
All Christmas parcels must be lim-
ited to seven pounds, for which a rate
of 12 cents for each pound or fraction
thereof will, be charged. Registered
or insured mail will be extra.
No Christmas seals of any kind must
be placed on the address side of the
parcel, and no seals which resemble in
any way regular stamps will be al-
lowed to go through the mails. Greet-
ings may be placed on the outside of.
parcels, providing that they do not in-
terfere with the address. Books may
bear ample dedicatory inscriptions.
WACO GUARDS GET MUNITIONS;
WAR CONDITIONS PREVAIL
Camp MacArthur, Waco, Texas,
Nov. 6.-With 30,000 rounds of am-
munition, machine gunners under
Lieut. Leslie S. Lee went to the in-
fantry range today for their initial
practict with rapid-fire Lewis guns,
Monday the boys will move to the
artillery range, 18 miles from camp,
where they will experience condi-
tions practically the same as htose
at the front,-living in pup tents for a
week. The men will work in dugouts
and trenches and the guns will be
concealed as they are on the battle
front. Lieutenant Lee has 30 expert
mechanics and machine gunners with
him to help in the instruction work.
The men in camp are working hard
and are looking forward to the time
when they will go to France.

-

East Liberty at 606

JOHN, JSA ER
310 W. Liberty Street
Phone 2484 or 825-M

Blue Flannel
Fabrics
Plain Weave and
Herringbone Stripes

'I

i

-

WE WILL SELL
40 Shared Hoover
30 Shares King Trailer
40 Shares Bower Roller

WE WILL BUY
Hoover Steel Ball

FForshee & Kuehnle
INVESTMENT SECURITIES
Phone 21694
419 1st Natl Bank Bldg.

STUDENTS ARE
TARDY

BETTER ,
THAN ABSENT

4

.a444 6

.

(Continued from Page One)
ate by going to bed an hour earlier,
where as now the day is just thirty
minutes,longer."
Prof. J. A. Bursley, also of the engin-
eering college who is giving the military
stores course, says that if the Uxxiver-
sity could have eastern time it would
be much better for everybody. All
classes could begin on the hour, stu-
den would get their normal amount of
sleep, and the result would be greate
efficiency and promptness.
MRS. A. E. FORSYTHE PRESENTS
WOMEN WITH ATHLETIC TROPHY
An arrow case containing 12 ar-
rows, each of which has a champion-
ship history, has been presented to the
Women's athletic association by Mrs.
Anna E. Forsythe, of Grand Rapids.
Mrs. Forsyth, formerly of Ann Ar-
bor, has suggested that this case be
used as an athletic trophy, to be pre-
sented each year to the winner of the
archery tournament. The winner
may retain the case until the following
year's contest, and the name of the
champion is to be inscribed on the in-
side. of the box from year to year.
Patronize Our Advertlsers.-Adv.

Exquisite Silk

Dresses-A Special

Collection on Sale Wednesday

Afternoon

i

County Clerk Smith has appointed
Mr. Clyde B. Elliott as- deputy clerk
to fill the vacancy caused by the death
of former Deputy Clerk Freauff.

Taffetas, satins, crepe de chines, crepe meteors and
combinations of these materials with Georgette crepe.
Black, brown and navy.
All-satin gowns in surplice effects with deep tunics,
sashes and white rolling collars.
A rich brown velvet gown with a bustle effect in the
back and chenille embroidery in the front.
A navy tailored velvet.gown with white satin collar and

.U

cuffs.
A pleated satin gown with black Georgette
white Georgette collar and vest.
About two dozen.
On Sale Wednesday afternoon from 2:00

Campus Policemen Appointed
J. A. Richardson and G. E. Darrow
were appointed campus policemen
by Mayor E. M. Wurster at the
meeting of the city council Monday
night. The men are to receive their
pay from the University.
At the same meeting, the mayor
appointed Ross Granger. as city
treasurer, the position' having been
made vacant by the death of Char.les
L. Miller. All appointments were
unanimously confirmed by the coun-
cIL
U. of M. Jewelry. J. L. ChaPman's

U

We are the only

sleeves and
to 5 :00 at

Students

S upply Store

$15.95

l

i

Buy her that box of Chocolates for the Game, and make sure that it is
GILBERT'S or MORSE'S

(Fashion Salon-Second Floor)

is the place. 118 S. Main.-Adv.
Dance at Armory on best floor in
city. Saturday night.-Adv.

. I

Phone 1160-I

l ll

Tin.

1 . 11 : : I

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