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November 07, 1917 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-11-07

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-1 r.. Wir. 1ILILrdX
NERALLY FAIR AND
WARNIER

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ASSOCIAT
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT
SERVICE

VIII. No. 32.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1917

PRICE THREE

TAXIRATERISE 4
OBJECTOF STRONG
STUDENTS' ATCK
FRATERNITIES AND SORORITIES
WILL FIGHT COMPANIES TO
FINAL SHOW-DOWN
CITY COUNCIL BALKS
RAILROADING EFFORT
Proposed Schedule Considered to Be
Unconstitutional Because of
Discrimination
Investigation of the proposed in-
crease in taxicab fares was begun
Tuesday by the ordinance committee
of the city council, according to one of
its members.
Some of the committee look favor-
ably upon a system of meter taxing
for fares. They feel that the plan pro-
posed by the taxicab companies is one
which would be unfair and making a
class discrimination, against students.
At the meeting of the ordinance com-
mittee, there seemed to be no general
sentiment favorably Inclined toward
the plan of raising the rates as pro-
jected by the six taxicab companies at
the council session Monday night.
Raise Unconstitutional
It is thought probable that the new
schedule of rates may not be consti-
tutional, contrary for the most part
to the general tenor of the charter, and
a flagrant case of discrimination
against class, .for, according to a
council member, the new scale of pric-
es would affect University students
more than any other class.
"There is grave doubt in my mind
and the minds of the others as well, as
to whether this apparent discrimina-'
tion will be legal," declared the coun-
cilman.
Organizations Will Fight
Many fraternities and sororitites ap-
proached on the matter of taxi fare in-
crease yesterday were quite decided
that the proposition was unfair to stu-
dents and the University patrons in
general.
"We most certainly will place our
every effort to prevent the increase,"
said one fraternity president. Another
declared that the rates would be ac-
companied by the falling off in pat-
ronage of about 60 men that he kenw
were convinced of the unfairness of
the plan.
"Most girls will no doubt feel as wea
do," stated a sorority president. "We
will help the men combat the so-called
'gouge prices' of the taxi companies.
We can walk and we will. I am sure
there are other girls who will be ready
to co-operate."
WAR BOARD GRANTS
UNIFORMS M ON E Y
State Supplements Government's Sum
To Equip Milltary Drill
Students
President Harry B. Hutchins, Dean
Mortimer E. Cooley, and Lieut. George
C. Mullen, appeared before the war
board at Lansing, yesterday, for the
purpose of asking that the amount
given by the government for student
uniforms be supplimented by an ap-
propriation of $10 each from the state

war fund.
The board granted the appropria-
tion to provide for any number up to
3,000 students, making a total of $24
for each uniform when added to the
government's sum. This amount will
give every student taking military
training a complete uniforVi, with the
exception of a pair of shoes.
The appropriation' is available at
once, and as soon as notice is receiv-
ed from the United States war depart-
ment the students will obtain the new
uniforms.

Griffins Welcome
14 Ne), Jembers
Banquet At Union Follows Fall Initia-
tion of Nine Seniors and
Five Juniors
Guided by the Burning Torch, led
by the Purple Robe, and helped by the
Staff of Life, 14 neophytts wended
their way across the campus Tuesday
afternon in a solemn procession to the
Griffins' rooms, where they were wel-
comed into the all-campus honorary
cociety.
After the ceremony the initiates
were allowed to appease their hunger
at a banquet held at the Michigan Un-
ion. As toastmaster Philip Emery, '18,
started, the evening speeches. Re-
sponses to toasts came from James
Schermerhorn, '18, Waldo McKee, '18E,
Prof. John Waite and James Chenot,
'19L.
Those who successfully passed the or-
deal are: Cecil C. Andrews, '18, Rex
St. Clair, '18, J. Orton Goodsell, '18D,
Charles Boos, '18, James Schermer-
horn, '18, Archie B. Weston, '18E, Jos-
eph A. Hanish, '19, Joseph H. Roder-
ick, '19, Matthew S. Towar, '19, Philip
C. Pack, '18, Raymond M. Langley,
'18E, Sherwald W. Sedgwick, '19,
Harry M. Carey, 19, and Arthur G. Ip-
pel, '18.
WOMEN'S VOCTIONAL
CONFERENCE TO OPEN
MISS GERTRUDE HILL WILL RE-
PLACE MRS. MIDDLETON
AS SPEAKER
Miss Gertrude Hill, field-secretary
of the Chicago Congregational train-
ing school for women, is to take Mrs.
Middleton's place on the vovational
conference program at 4 o'clock
Thursday afternoon in Barbour gym-
nasium.
"Women in Religious Education,"
is Miss Hill's topic. She is now mak-
ing a tour of Michigan colleges, for
the purpose of explaining to women
the varoius positions open to them in
the religious field. The position of
church assistant is one of the most
important. There is also many op-
portunities for other services that have
been made possible by the war.
All the women who were graduated
last June from the school with which
Miss Hill is connected, were placed
in desirable positions before the sum-
mer was over. At present there are 1'
openings that can be filled at once by
women who have had the proper train-
ing and wish to engage in religious
work.
ANNOUNCE ENGAGEMENT OF
1. H .COOLEY TO R. H. KNIGHT
Prof. Charles H. Cooley and Mrs.
Cooley have announced the engage-
ment of theiradaughter Margaret H.
'18, to Rufus H. Knight, '21M.
Miss Cooley is a member of Collegi-
ate Sororis and Knight is a member of
Psi Upsilon and Nu Sigma Nu, medical
fraternity.
Knight, who is a chief petty officer
of the naval reserves has been on
furlough since the University reopened
this fall.
Mr. Goodrich Will Go to Camp Greene
Mr. F. L. D. Goodrich of the Univer-
sity library, who was recently assigned
to library work at Camp Wadsworth,
S. C., has been transferred to Camp

Greene, Charlotte, N. C., to act as lib-
rarian in that cantonment.
This change comes as a result of the
recent offer to the New York state
library to the government to send a
man from its staff, paying his salary
in full if he could be assigned to Camp
Wadsworth, S. C., the cantonment for
New York national guards.
German women are building concrete
dugouts in the fire zone.

BIG. PLURALITY ELECTS.
KYLAN NEW YORK MAYOR

WOMAN SUFFRAGE LEADS
DISTRICTS HEARD
FROM

IN

New York, Nov. 6.-John F. Hylan,
a county judge of Kings county, was
elected mayor of New York today by
a plurality of more than 100,000. He
carried with him the entire Democrat-
ic city ticket.
Mayor John P. Mitchell, who sought
re-election as a Fusion candidate, al-
though not formallynominated byany
party, was a poor second in the race.
His. vote in 1940 districts out of 2068
in the city, was 141,033, compared with
277,101 for Hylan.
Morris Hillquit, the Socialist candi-
,date, about whom rallied most of the
radical elements in the city, and all
those who favor an immediate nego-
tiated peace, stood third with 129,371,
and William M. Bennett, who won the
Republican primary nomination, was]
fourth with 90,083.
From the time the returns were re-
ceived from the first 100 districts, the
result never was in doubt. It was evi-
dent Hylan had secured an over-
whelming victory and again brought'
control of the city in the hands of
Tammany Hall.
Judge Hylan's first act after being]
assured of his election was to make'
this statement:
"I want to make it plain to the world
that there was no issue of American-
ism or loyalty involved so far as I
am concerned. There could be none,
for I am as good an American as any
man, as loyal to my flag, as loyal to
my country, and as firm and deter-
mined in support of every act of the'
government in this war as any man."r
Returns from 2205 election districts
out of 5772 in the state on woman's'
suffrage:'
Yes, 228,487;
No, 210,382.
Cincinnati, Nov. 6.-Six hundred and]
sixty-seven precincts out of 5756 in
Ohio on prohibition gave 60,572 votes
in favor of the movement and 56,373
against it. Eight hundred and twenty-
six precincts out of 5,756 in the state
gave 57,745 votes for woman's' suf-
frage, and 56,800 opposed.
NEW YELLS MANY
FOR CORNELL GAME'
Contest in 1916 Originated Cheers That
Can Be Used Satur-
day
Complaints are once more coming
in from students to the effect that our
yells are too old and that new yells
ought to be introduced in their stead.
It was therefore suggested that an at-
tempt. be made to encourage the use by
the students of the three yells which
were awarded prizes in the yell contest1
held last year.
The prizes for the winning yells,
which were first tried on Nov. 2, 1916,
at the game with Washington univer-
sity, were given by J. F. Scully, '12.
They are as follows:
First prize yell:
Boom AM !
Bang Rah:
Smash 'Em Up,
Micigan!
Second prize yell:
M-m-m -m-m M-m-m
Michigan,
R-r-r R-r-r R-r-r
Rushi-gan Michigan,
Rah!
Third prize yell:
Michigan, Fight Again,
Fight Again, Michigan,
Rah! Rah! Michigan!
These yells have been chosen as the
best among two hundred submitted.
They are as good as any, and should be

re-introduced at the Cornell game.

PEP MEEINBWill
THREATEN CORNELL
Assembly To Feature Thursday Be-
cause of Pre-Festival Concert
On Friday
SPEAKERS WELL KNOWN FOR
ABILITY TO AR'0USE SPIRIT
Varsity Band's "Victors" Will Cheer
Team To Last Effort
On Home Field
Michigan's last pep meeting for the
football season of 1917 will be held
at 7 o'clock Thursday evening in Hill
auditorium.
The variation from the usual cus-
tom of holding the meeting is due
to the fact that one of the pre-festival
concerts is scheduled for Friday even-
ing. This leaves Thursday evening the
only convenient date before the Cor-
nell game.
Each pep meeting this year has
been considered better than the pre-
vious one and efforts are being made
to make the last one the best.
Besides the usual array of speak-
ers, the band will be present'to do its
bit of stirring up pep in the students.
Seats have been reserved for the team.
The speakers are Shirley W. Smith,
secretary of the University, Waldo
McKee, '18E,Mr. Oscar Carpell of
Saginaw, Mr. Walter K. Towers, '12L,
and Mr. Fred Lawton, '97M.
McKee is -well known on the campus
and scarcely needs an introduction to
anyone. He will act as chairman of
the evening.
"Walter K. Towers knows everyone
that has been to Michigan for the last
10 years and knows some funny story
about veryone he knows," said one
man on the campus when asked about
Towers. "He. is a wonderful speaker
and has lots of pep." During the
school year of 1911-12 Towers edited
the Iichigan Daily, and until last
spring was editor of the American
Boy. At that time he left to take the
position of editor of the Milestones
Magazine, published by the Firestone
Tire company.
Mr. Carpell played Varsity football
in 1911 and has sat in the front seats
listening to pep talks many times. Be-
cause of his experience on the team
and his knowledge of what the play-
ers need most, Carpell should be able.
to put forth something good.
Mr. Fred Lawton is rated equal to
hold up his end of the alumni trio
which is scheduled to speak. He has
spoken on the campus before and his
reputation speaks for itself better
than it can be spoken for.
Mr. Smith will be the faculty speak-
er of the evening and was picked be-
cause of his success last year at the
Penn game meeting.
IOTA SIGMA PI, HONORARY
CHEMISTRY SORORITY, MEETS
Phosporus chapter of Iota Sigma Pi,
honorary chemical sorority, held its
second meeting of the year Monday
afternoon in the Chemistry building.
Florence Fenwick, '17, spoke on op
portunities .for women along scientific
lines in the present day. Miss Fen-
wick, who is a member of Iota Sigma
Pi and Sigma Psi, honorary scientific
society, is at present in the employ
of the General Chemical company, and
is in a position to be well acquainted
with this subject.
The local chapter of Iota Sigma Pi
was installed last May. The society
meets twice a month, and its pur-

pose is to promote interest in chemis-
try among women. The active mem-
bers are Ann Christenson, '18, Eliz-
abeth Dunlap, '18, Dorothy Hall, '18,
Margaret Hawxhurst, '18, Charlotte
Kelsey, '18, and Mrs. J. S. Laird.
Boston Re-elects Republican Ticket
Boston, Mass., Nov. 6.-Governor
McCall and the rest of the Republican
state ticket were re-elected by a large'
plurality today.

ELIGIBILITY NOTICE
The committee on eligibility
has learned that a number of
students recently declared inel-
igible for certain public activi-
ties, having obtained letters of
recommendation form their
Deans, are proceeding with
these activities under the im-
pression that they are now elig..
ible.
The committee wishes to re-
mind such students, and partic-
ularly the managers and chair-
men of public activities, that no
student is to be counted eligible
until he has been declared so.
The Deans do not issue certifi-
ates of eligibliity; they only rec-
ommend such action, in special
cases, to the committee. It will
not often happen that the com-
mittee will fail to act upon the
recommendations of the Deans
concerned; but it may happen in
any particular case. And even
if it be assumed that the final
outcome will always be a pleas-
ant one, the committee insists on
being allowed to share the pleas-
ure. Otherwise, it would be in
the embarassing position of not
knowing who are and who are
not eligible.
It may save some misunder-
standing in the future to add
thatthere are no blanket special
permissions. The fact that a
person has been given the ben-
efit of a doubt once carries no
assurance that he will be given
it twice.. Each separate activity
calls for a separate certificate
of eligibility.
W. R. HUMPHREYS,
Chairman.
STUDENTS ARE BETTER
TARDY THAN ABSENT
LATECOMERS MORE DESIRABLE

OPEN DOOR PLC
UOIGIPHELD B UTTE
REACH AGREEMENT ON NAVA]
MILITARY, AND ECONOMIC
CO-OPERATION
IS PAN-AMERICAN, NOT
MONROE D O C T RIN]
Countries Pledge for Definite Lne6
Action; No Offensive-Defen-
sive Alliance
Washington, Nov. 6. - Formal an
nouncement today of a clear under
standing between the United State
and Japan on naval, military, and eco
omic co-operation in the war agains
Germany, and of a complete agree
ment in regard to China was greete
in official diplomatic circles as one
the momentous events of the war.
Its effect is expected to be far reach
ing both upon future developments In
the far east and upon the persecutio
of the struggle for democracy.
In addition to the notes exchange
between Secretary Lansing and Vis
count Ishil, the special Japanese em
bassador, recording an agreement re
cognizing Japan's special interest i
China, guaranteeing the independenc
and territorial integrity of China, an
harboring the "open door policy," it i
announced that a satisfactory under
standing has been reached as to mil
itary, naval, and economic co-gpera
tion.
Informally, it is explained that hi
agreement is in no sense an applica
tion of the Monroe Doctrine to th
orient, but Instead is rather an appli
cation of the Par-American doctrin
of "hands off."
In differentiating between the Mon
roe Doctrine and Pan-Americanism, of
ficials said the former was distinctl
a national policy while the latter wa
altruistic and international.
No intimation was given as to wha
would be considered the "special inter
ests" of Japan, but the comparison wa
drawn with the position of the Unite
States as regards to Mexico.
The complete accord reached be
tween the United States and Japan, i
was authoritatively explained, does ne
mean that an offensive and defensiv
alliance has been created between th
two countries such as exist betwee:
Japan and Great Britian, althoug
both nations do pledge themselves to
definite line of action.
Emphasis was laid in official dis
cussions on the last paragraph of th
agreement. This is the declaratio:
that both countries are opposed to th
acquisition by any government of an
special rights or prfvilege that woul
effect the independence or territoria
integrity of China, or that would den
to the subjects or citizens of any cou
try the full enjoyment of equal o
portunity in the commerce or industr
of China.
Yea '21-Here 's
Another YPrid
"Hang the luck, they left me ou
and I think it's mean," said one of th
verdant youths as he perused th
Students' Directory just put on sal
For several days he had been an
iously waiting to see his name i

print as a real, honest-to-gosh Mich
gan man, and now that the time ha
come he was cheated-cheated of be
ing on the "roll of honor." He was a
most on the verge of tears.
"Here, froh, you must be in," grow
ed the rescuing upperclassman, "let
see it."
And then the row began!
For the naive, dear child had bee
looking for his name under "B" in th
front of the book-in the faculty lis

THAN ABSENTEES
PROFESSORS

SAY

Should students miss classes rather
than go in late? Professors to whom
the question was put think not. Al-
though there is considerable tardiness,
especially in the literary college, they
prefer to haye students come in tardy
rather than be absent. Much of the
recent lteness is attributed to the
difficulty that both students and facul-
ty have experienced in adjusting them-
selves to the half-hour shift in classes.
Professors Give Opinions
Prof. W. L. Hobbs of the geology de
partment, says in this connection,
"Classes should be dismissed exactly
on time, so that students who niust go
from one building to another will have
ample time to do so. It is always an-
noying to be interrupted by late com-
ers, but it is betterthat they come
in than lose the hour."
A. F. Shull, associate professor of
zoology, suggests that students coming
n late would make a minimum disturb-
ance by taking seats in the rear of the
room, but he wants them to feel free to
come in.
. Cases of tardiness are negligible in
the law department, according to Prof.
E. C. Goddard. He thinks, however,
that signals for dismissing classes
would be helpful, especially in those
buildings where the half hour strokes
of the clock are almost inaudible.
Mid-Hour Beginnings Undesirable
Beginning the day on the half hour
is less desirable than the old way,
is the opinion of a majority of the
professors spoken to, but the extra
light is necessary for the military drill
classes. Prof. H. E. Riggs of the eng-
ineering college, thinks that a return
to eastern time would help. He says,
"It is easier to change the hands of
the clock than to shift classes for-
ward. Students would then compens-
(Continued on Page Six)

;_ .

._...-

November 8
t 4:00 P. M.
7:45 P. M.
November 9
4:00 P. M.

Fourth V
Annual
Welcomes all Women of the University and Ann Arbor

Conference
Supper
Nov. 8 6 P.M

SARAH

CASWELL

ANGELL

HALL

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