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November 06, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-11-06

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WEATHER
ALLY FAIR AND
WARMRE

r Sir i6r

at i

DAY AND NIGHT V
SERVICE

No. 31.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 6. 1917.

PRICE

MENACE
5 RIGHT
BY DRIVE

JUNIORS
CLASS

NOMINATE
CANDIDATES

SING THE TAGLIAMENTO BY
UTONS MEANS TROUBLE
TO CADORNA
LIN REPORTS 6,000
'RISONERS CAPTURED
Of Italy's General Relieved,
mporarily; Prepare Stronger'
Position

By Associated Press)
ustro-German forces
tst the Italians on the:

operat-
Taglia-

mento river, from the, region of the
Carnic Alps southward to the Adriatic
Sea, are proving a serious menace.
The invaders have driven their way
,pcross the river at Pinzano and are
proceeding westward, while to the
north of the Italian left wing, inten-
sive operations are being carried out
by the Teutonic allies, the two man-
euvers probably having as their objec-
'tive the cutting off of the entire rigt
'-wing ,of General Cadorna's army.
The Berlin war office, in its an-
mouncement of the crossing of the
river says, 6,000 Italians were made
prisoners and an additional number
of guns were also taken. The Italian
official communication makes only
brief mention of the operation, merely
asserting that the enemy succeeded in
bringing some of its forces to the
right bank of the stream.
Temporary Stand at Tagliamento
There is no indication as yet, wheth-
er it is the intention of General Cad-
orna to endeavor to maintain the Tag-
liamento line, but it is not improba-
ble that his stand is only a temporary
one, while positions of greater
strength 'are being prepared in the
rear.
Both the Rome and Berlin war of-
ifres are silent as to the movement be-
gun by the enemy in the Trentino re-
gion last Sunday, which it was believ-
ed at the time indicated that the Ger-
mans and Austrians were attempting
to push southward along the western
bank of Lake Garda and out upon the
plains between Milan and Verona.
British and French Continue 'Raids
The British and French troops in
Flanders continue to carry out raid-
Ing operations successfully against
the Germans and to bombard heavily
the enemy positions at various points.
Two additional defeats of the Turk-
Ish forces are reported by the Brit-
ish in southern Palestine, and by the
Russians in the region of the Black
Sea coast. North of Beersheba, the
British are pressing forward. Their
objective is the coast city of Gaza.
In their operations, they have taken
207 officers and 2,429 prisoners.
German Patrols Cross Tagliomento
Italian Headquarters in Northern
Italy, Nov. 5.-The reports of heavy
artillery fire on both banks of the Tag-
llamento with chief pressure on the
Italian left wing shows that Austro-
German patrols have crossed the river
and that the enemy is trying to throw
his men all into the plain of the west-
ern Friuli region.
The enemy attack in the Giudicarcia
valley on the Trentino front also
shows clearly his purpose to make a
mass attack from the north.
The situation is still grave. The at-
tention now centers on the string of
defenses west of the Tagliamento
river and on their ability to effect a
vast reorganization, and oppose the
whole force of the concentration of
Italian troops and allied reinforce-
ments, against the 'tremendous pres-
sure the enemy is exerting.
NO TETANVS GERMS IN
HEALTH SERVICE VACCINE

Election Date To Be Set When Elig..
Ibility Committee Gives
Sanction
Nominations for class officers were
made at the first meeting of the junior
lits held Saturday morning. These
names will be voted upon after the
eligibility committee has sanctioned
them.
The nominees for president are F.
Cortez Bell and Joseph -Broderick;
vice-president, Ada Arnold and Franc-
es McDonald; secretary, Anna Mac-
Mahon and Jennie Duemling; treas-
urer, Gerald F. Nye; oratorical dele-
gates, -Vera Andrus, William J. Ken-
nick, and Roy Fric ken student coun-
cilman, James McClintock and Harry
Carey.
No definite date for elections has
been set.
UNWERSITY TO INSTAL
NEW INDUSTRIAL COURSE
DR. EUGENE A. MYERS WILL
OPEN EDUCATIONAL TRAIN-
ING NEXT SEMESTER
Dr. George A. Myers, for the past
three years superintendent of con-
tinuation school in New York City, will
come to the University soon to install
a new course in industrial education
for prospective industrial training]
teachers for high schools.-
The course will begin the second
semester under the supervision of the
educational department. Dr. Myers
will make a thorough investigation of;
the industrial classes in Michigan high1
schools before commencing his work
at the University.
After being graduated frot Kansas
collge, University of Chicago and,
Clark university, Dr. Myers studied in,
the graduate school of Columbia uni-
versity. He then went to Europe to
learn the industrial conditions there
and to prepare a survey for the bur-
eau at Washington. Previous to his
work in New York he was principal ofj
McKinley high school at Washington.
His position at the University is
made possible through the existence of
the Smith-Hughes bill which provides
that the government and the state
furnish a fund which can be used for
the installation of a course in indus-
trial education here.,
U. S. TO LEVY NEW
WAR INCOME TAX

REV. LLOYD DOUGLAS
SAYS EVERYONE CAN

Ohio State Raises $16,000 With 3,800
Students Enrolled; Drive Opens .
November 141

More than 100 men attended the
Sunday afternoon meeting of the Uni-
versity's Friendship War fund cam-
paign committee, where detailed -ac-
counts of the mission, scope and meth-
ods of the effort to secure $25,000 in
this University for camp relief work
were explained.
Five division commanders were ap-
pointed to lead the AIve team cap-
tains, who in turn have in their charge
seven men each. The division com-
manders are: Edwin Cunliffe, '19,
H. Willard Jones, '18E, Ralph Gault,
'19, and Harry Storz, '19. The men
will meet at 6:45 o'clock in Lane
hall for instruction and coaching in
the campaign methods.
"No fellow has the right to be in
college, if he hasn't a. particular reas-
on for being there, either to prepare
himself for conflict, or to train for
the coming reconstruction after-
wards," declared the Rev. Lloyd C.
Douglas in his talks to the boys Sun-
day night. "The person who says he
hasn't the money to help out this
cause has no right to assert that he is
in college to learn future leadership.
And the men who argues that there
should be a J-hop on an expensive
scale 'is certainly not a leader," con-
tinued Reverend Douglas.
He gave some interesting figures,
among which was the statement that
one fraternity expense for a J-hop
would amount to nearly $1,500, which
would purchase 100 overcoats for pris-
oners of war.
Mr. N. C. Fetter secretary of the cam-
paign in his address to the group ex-
plained that the $1,500 of the fratern-
ity spent for pleasure would buy 15
camp libraries, "comforts" for 1,500
men, dangerously ill or wounded, a
service Y for 6,000 soldiers, or six
complete orchestras.
"Ohio 'State university with her 3,-
800 students has raised a quota of
$1§,000 for the Friendhsip war fund,"
said Mr. Fetter, and Michigan ought to
easily beat the Ohioans. "We are not
after a man's small change, we want
his donation. One man here in the
University, who is 'dshwashing' his
way through school, gave $100 for thc
fund, That's real spirit."
Until Nov. 14 the time of the men
will be spent in drilling -aid planning
for the drive, which opens then.
PENN STUDENTS GIVE $2,500
FOR SAMMIES' CHRISTMAS
Philadelphia, Pa., Nov. 5.- Every
student of the University of Pennsyl-
vania who is in the service of the
government will receive a Christmas
box, the gift of his fellow students.
This was determined upon at a meet-
ing today of the presidents of the sen-
ior classes of all departments of the
university who will conduct a three
day campaign to raise a fund of $2,500
with which to make the gift possible.
Each box will contain one pipe, one
pound of tobacco, one tobacco pouch,
one box of candy and one subscription
to "Old Penn," the University weekly
magazine.
More than 1,000 Pennsylvania under-
graduates have enlisted or have been
taken in the draft.
Sir Douglas Haig Defies Custom
London,.Nov. 5.-In matters of dress
and etiquette, Sir Douglas Haig, Com-
mander of the British forces in France,
is the most unconventional of field-
marshals, and the despair of strict
disciplinarians. Besides discarding
the shoulder-strap of his'Sam Browne
belt, Sir Douglas refuses to wear the
ivory-hilted curved sword prescribed
for officers of his rank, and prefers
the cavalry sabre. He also defies cus-
tom by using a hunting bit for his
horse instead of the heavy service

pattern.
Word has been recived that James
L. Whalen, '17E, former Varsity foot-
ball player has arrived safely in
France. Whalen is a lieutenant in the

Washington, Nov. 5.-Three Amer-
ican infantrymen are dead, five wound-
ed and 12 captured, as a result of a
short salient of front . line French
on a short salient of front line French
trenches held by Pershing's men, Nov.
3.
One wounded German was captured.
This brief report, announced by the
war department, brought home to Am-
erica today the first casualities in dead
and captured resulting from actual
fighting between Sammies and Ger-
mans.
Attacking before daylight under
protection of a heavy barrage fire
which cut the American salient off
from the rest of the line, the Ger-
mans apparently completed their
operations before reinforcements
could reach'the Americans.
Fails to Give Details
No word in Pershing's statement
indicates the extent of the Americans'
part in the fighting.
An ordinary trench salient hold
between 25 and 30 men, so it would
appear that the little force of Sam-
mies was practically wiped out.
That a "wounded German" was taken
prisoner however, shows that a fight
was put up before the Americans yield-
ed. The size of the attacking force and
German losses are not given. The war
department has cabled for full partic-
ulars.
First announcement of the capture
of "North Americans" was made by
Berlin Saturday. It was stated a "re-
connoitering party" brought them in
from a point on the Rhine-M arne can-
al. This would indicate that Persh-
ing's men are on one of the main roads
to Lorraine, where the Germans ad-
vanced in 1914 and where, early in
the war, some of the fiercest fighting
of the period took place. For two years
the sector has been quiet.
Germany Now Knows
The principal point, war department
officials say, is that all Germany now
knows Americans are In the front line
trenches-a fact that Germany has
been trying to keep secret. The Ger-1
man attitude is indicated by her suc-
cinct statement that "North Americ-
ans" were prisoners, not specifying
that they were the first captures of
Pershing's men.
Having located some of the Amer-
ican forces, officials believe the crowni
prince, whose army is opposite the
point where the Saturday skirmish
took place, may attempt to stage a
spectacular attack in the sector.
Washington, Nov. 5.- The afficial
casualty list of the losses to American
troops in France in their first clash
with the Germans follows:]
Killed<
Private Thomas F. Enright, sisterI
Mrs. Mary Irwin, 6641 Premo street,l
Pittsburg. Private James B. Gresham,f
mother Mrs. Alice Dodd, 1001 Westi
Ohio street, Evansville, Ind. Privatec
Merle D. Hay, father Harvey D. Hay,I
Glidden Ia.1
Woundedt
Private John J. Smith, brother F. D,
Smith, box 82, Ludington, Mich. Pri-t
vate Charles J. Hopkins, brother Jamesi
W. Hopkins, Stanton, Texas, Private
Homer Givens, father William F. Giv-F
ens, Cloverdale, Ala. Private Charles
L. Orr, mother Mrs. Sarah Regnell, R.I
F. D. No. 5, Lyons, Kans. Private1
George L. Box, father James L. Box,
700 North Grady street, Altus, Okla.
Fresh Lits Nominate Class Officers
Fresh lit nominations made Satur-
day morning, are: Ray Lounsbury and
Fred Petty for president; Dorothy

Snow and Dorothy Herman, vice-
president; Elinor Crabb and Elinor
Leonard, secretary; Ferd Schemm and
Fred Fletcher, terasurer;,Wesley Nut-
ten and Albert Jacobs, men's oratorical
delegate; Margaret McDonald and Bes-
sie Roberts, women's oratorical dele-

100 MEN ATTEND
WAR FUND METING
Five Division Commanders Selected
To Manage Soliciting Captains
Canvass Teams

GERMANS TRAP S
SAMMIES IN RAID
Sharp Attack on Salient Nets Huns
Five Wounded, and 12 Captur-
ed Americans
WOUNDED PRISONER TAKEN
BY U. S. TROOPS IN FIGHT
Heavy Barrage Fire Aids Teutons in
Cutting Off "North Amer-
icans"

HELPI

PRESIDENT I ..HUTCHINS
SAYS-
This is the hour for sacrifice.
We are in the midst of a great
crisis. Although but recently
drawn into the conflict, our
country must from now on bear
a large part of the tremendous
burden. And a most important
part of that burden is, and will
continue to be, the moral and
physical protection and care of
the brave men who stand be-
tween us and the autocratic
domination. To aid in furnish-
ing that protection and care is
the object of the campaign in
behalf of the Students' Million °
Dollar Friendship War ,fund.
Every dollar of the fund will be
devoted to that work. The min-
imum for the University has
been fixed at $25,000. This
worthy appeal will, I am sure,
strike a responsive chord. The
minimum amount and more will
be raised if teachers and stu-
dents do their full duty.
PRESIDENT H. B. HUTCHINS.
TEUTON PROTESTS 'DEEDS
TOAMBASSDORGERARD
CLAIMS OFFICERS MADE SOLD-
IERS SHOOT DOWN RUSSIANS
WITHOUT MERCY
Washington, Nov. 5.-The fact that
German soldiers themselves appealed
to Ambassador Gerard as the "repre-
sentative of a Christian state" to pro-
test against atrocities and butcheries
in which their commanders force them
to participate, will be disclosed in a
forthcoming issue of a pamphlet by
the committee on public information
entitled "German War Numbers."
One German soldier, conscience
stricken with the massacre of Russian
prisoners, implored the American am-
bassador to protest and signed his let-
ter "A German soldier and Christian."
. This was the protest of a German
soldier and eye witness of the
slaughter of Russian soldiers in the
Masurian Lakes and swamps:
"It was frightful, heart rendering,
as these masses of human beings were
driven to destruction. Above the ter-
rible thunder of the cannon could be
heard the heart rending cries of the
Russians. But there was no mercy.
-Our captain had ordered 'the whole
lot must die, so rapid fire!' As I have
heard, five men and one officer on our
side went mad from those cries, but
most of my comrades and the officers
joked as the unarmed and helpless
Russians shrieked for mercywhile they
were being shot down. The order was
'close up and at it harder!' For days
afterward those yells followed me and
I dare not think of them or I shall
go mad.
PLAYS "O SAY" THEN
RESIGNS POSITION
Dr. Carl Muck Leads Boston Sym-
phony Orchestra in National
Anthem as Finale

6 COMPAIESA
COUNCIL TO ALL
IGHER TAXIRA
PETITION CLAIMS PRICE 01
OLINE, OIL, AND TIRES N
ESSITATES INCREASE
STUDENTS DECIDEDI
AGAINST INCR)
One Councilman Favers, Metei
tem; Proposed Day Ciarg
30 Cents
The common council at its n
last night referred to the ordi
committee a petition signed b
six local taxi companies requ
that they be permitted to In
their rates. The petition state
due to the exorbitant prices de:
ed for gasoline, oils, tires, as w
repairs, they find it Imposslb
maintain an existence with the p
rates.
Members of the council are -
ing a great deal of interest i
petition due to the spirit of antag
that is growing among the .sti
toward any increase in taxi
The members of the ordinance cd
tee decided to pay carefui att
to this request and to count up
position from the campus.
Most of the councilmen refus
comment upon the petition. 0
them, however, declared himse
favor of the adoption of a mete:
tem, suggesting that the taxi
panies charge the passengers b
hour and according to the amoi
gasoline used. I
The petition included a list of
submitted by the taxi compani
the consideration of the council,
ing that they be approved. The
submitted are as follows:
For each passenger to any pi
the city, between the hours of 6 0
in the morning and 11 o'clock at
35 cents; between the hours
o'clock at night and 6 o'clock i
the following morning, 50 cents
each additional stop, 25 cents
children over six and under 12
of age, accompanied by their
or guardian, 20 cents.
Party and theater rates, evenin
formances and concerts, for the
to and from, per couple, $2; fc
trip one way per couple, $1.
For conveying any single tin:
box from first floor to first flo
cents; between the hours of six o
and 7 o'clock in the evening, 50
on Sundays, 50 cents; for each
tional floor, 25 cents.
ENGINEERS ELECT CLASS
OFFICERS' FOR 191
The college of engineering e
the following officers for the
Senior class-president, Phillip
roll; vice-president, E. M. Scha
secretary, Dorothy Hall; trea
Leo P. Tattersall; oratorical del
H. M. Stevens.
Junior class - president, R
Clair; secretary, Clifford M. Sp
treasurer, William Cruse; orat
delegate, W. Dow; junior reproi
tives to Engineering society,
Smith, C. T. Van Dusen.
Sophomore class-president, C
Hogan; vice-president, C. 0. B
secretary; J. V. Tracy; treasur
P. Dickenson.

Freshman class - president,
Winchell; vice-president, C. N. J
ton; secretary, Miss L. B. Si
treasurer, Robert Brown; orat
delegate, J. Spence.
Senior Law Students Elect 0
Election of senior Law officer
appointment of committees re
resulted as follows: President,
tor A. McCrimmon; vice-pres
Lester S. Hecht; secretary, Leli
Forrest; treasurer, John P. C
oratorical delegate, Paul U. Ir
social committees, S. G. Pi
chairman, J. H. Cartwright,
Ruihley, M. B. Bowman, and A. J
eski;. auditing committee,
Simons, chairman, B. S. Motte
H. C. Hart.
A meeting of the advisory e
tee, which, consists of the office
the two committee chairmen, w

Administration Will Urge 10
Increase on All

Per CentI

Persons
Chicago, Nov. 5.-Government offi-
cials who will have part in framing
another war tax when congress meets
in December are considering a straight'
additional income tax on all persons,
as well as increased war profits to
raise more revenue. The administra-,
tion realizes that there must be great-
er revenue producing sources provided
to meet the growing war expenditures,
and a straight income tax of 10 per-.
cent on all persons and corporations
will be urged.
The two laws now in effect are ex-
pected to raise $3,800,000,000 for a full
year. If the war continues the gov-
ernment expects to spend $25,000,000,-
000.,, The general policy is to raise
one-fifth of this amount by taxes and
an additional $1,200,000,000 must be
levied in the new tax bill to be pre-
pared by the new congress.
In defense of the new plan it was
pointed out that Great Britain levies
a tax of 25 per cent on all incomes of
every sort above $630.
DR. A. G. HALL TO SPEAK
AT Y. W. C. A. VESPER SERVICE

Boston, Nov. 5.- Dr. Carl Muck,
leader of the Boston Symphony or-1
chestra, whose actions in refusing tot
play "The Star Spangled Banner" were
being investigated by federal author-
ities, gave this selection as a final
number of his Friday afternoon's con-
cert. At the same time, Maj. Henry
L. Higginson, a patron of the orches-
tra, announced that Dr. Much had
tendered his resignation.
Shortly after the failure of the Bos-
ton Symphony orchestra to play the1
national anthem at a concert in Prov-
idence, R. I., grave charges were filed
against Dr. Muck, but Major Higgin-
son on Friday declared that Dr. Muck
had never refused to play this num-
ber, having done so willingly that aft-
ernoon, at his request .
Generous applause was accorded Dr.
Muck, both upon his initial appear-
ance of the afternoon and after the
final number.
Engineering Faculty to Give Banquets
Members of the engineering college
faculty will banquet Wednesday eve-
ning, Oct. 7, in the first of a series
of such affairs to be held on the first
Wednesday of very month. The ban-
quet will be informal. Matters -per-
taining to the welfare of 'the depart-

University students need have no!
ar of contracting tetanus through "War service. in a New Light," is the
nall-pox vaccination performed in subject of the address to be given by Dr
in Arbor. According to the health 'Arthur G. Hall at the Y. W. C. A.
rvice officials, a small amount of vesper services at 4:30 o'clock Wed-
nall-pox vaccine in the east was sus- nesday afternoon at Newberry hall.'
cted of containing tetanus germs Dr. Hall will attempt to aid the col-
it the supply in Ann Arbor is per- lege woman in the solution of the new
etly safe. problems which the war has brought
The danger of small-pox will not be upon her, and to present some of the
er for another week since it takes many opportunities for active service
out 14 days for the disease to de- I for which her training has especially

In

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