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November 04, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-11-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WEATHER
ALLY FAIR AND
WARMER

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AVA
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1I

&ut6V

ASSOC'
PR]
DAY AND N]
SEEM

.. .

VOL. XXVIII. No. 30.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 1917.

I U -

ITALY STOPS HUNS
DESPITE THRUSTS
ON TAGLIAMENTO

O.R.C. TO GRADUATE
19,000 IN MONTH
men to Recelie Commissions or Be
Placed on Reserve
Lists
Washington, Nov. 3.- Plans have
been completed by the war department
to graduate the men in the second of-
ficers' reserve corps this month.
Every one of the 19,000 who are ex-

PATROLS STRUGGLE'
IN SILENT FIGHTS.

Berlin's Announcement
Dramas Staged in No
Land

Outlines
Man's

"Y"J PLANS FOR,
WAR FUND DRIVE
Committee to Meet at 6:30 o'Clock
Tonight in Lane Hall flor
Thorough Discussion
PERSHING CLAIMS WORK IS
BENEFICIAL TO SOLDIERS
American Y4 M. C. A. in Germany Only
Connection Between Sammies
and United States

FACULTY TO VOTE
ON MICHIGAN GAME

CADORNA
IS ABLE

EXTENDS LINES AND
TO KEEP INVADERS
AT BAY

CONCENTRATION OF
GERMANS THREATENS
Berlin Announces Withdrawal From
Chemin-des Dames Plateau

pectad
either
placed
call.

to receive commissions will
be commissioned at once or
on the eligible list subject to

CAPTURED AMERICANS CAN
TELL NO TALES OF BATTLES
"No Shooting" In Vogue Among Men
Working Between Lines at
Front

Chicago Board in Control Refers
Question to Professors After
Meeting
Chicago, Nov. 3.-A vote of the en-
tire faculty of the University of Chi-
cago will be taken here next week, in
finally determining whether Michiga
and Chicago will play here Dec. 1. The
question was taken up at a. special meet-
ing of the Chicago board in control of
athletics, and referred to the faculty
for a vote.
WAR TAX TOTINCREASE'
FRATERNITY EXPENSES

N

MICHIGA
DOWNI
SCORE
UP-STATE TEA
AGAINST V
WITHOI

By Teutons

(By Associated Press)
Extending his line on the Taglia-
!ento eivr, General Cadorna has so
far been able to hold intact most of
the Thies on the north and south fronts
aaong the swollen river, despite sever-
al attempts of the invaders to effect a
crossing.
The commander of the Italian arm-
"ies pointed out that though his forces
Aid been forced to retire, and had suf-
'fer ed severe losses in.men and mater-
tlals, the new line is much shorter
than te old and will be easier to de-
fend froma attack.,
With the present concentration of
Austro-Germa.u forces against the
Italians, there ,exists a serious men-
ace to the line iti the nature of a
flank thrust to the north. Close at-
tention is being paid td the Trentino,
where heavy concentratiOi of troops
° is likely to develop..
Berlin announces the completd with-
qdrawal of her forces from the Chem-
in4es Dames plateau. The movement
was tb0 result of recent French Sae'.
easses southwest of Laon, which gave
te Frendh positions. for their guns.
This made a large section untenable
f *r the Germans.
hjmreani prisoners ii.ve been taken
by the Germans, Berlin .anounced
brie. today stating that their sap-
ture .was the restut tof the rqcent
thrust , at the point where the Aisne-
Marne , aafal crosses the Jench front
near the . . *ermau border, 20 Pmiles
northeast otLuteville.
With the n1ei army, Nov. 3.-A
new German etrea over a 15 mile
front overshfM Ws evacuation in the
Chemindes-D m veotor.
A super effo'rt on the part of the
Teutonsto hold the ramparts could
be accomplished only at an immense
cost and the attempt ;vas abandoned
today.
The Germans found it impossible
to move amunition or food and for
carriers to pass through the tornado.
of shells and machine gun bullets was
impossible. The French are in close
.touch with the enemy at this point.
BRITISH BOATS WIN VICTORY
OVER GERMANS IN KATTEGAT

GLEE CLUB TO PRESENT
INITIAL CONCERT DEC. 7
CONTEMPLATE GOING TO CAMP
CUSTER TO GIVE REAL
ENTERTAINMENT
Preparations for the first Glee club
concert on Dec. 7 begin with a rehear-
sal at 7 o'clock Monday night at the
School of Music. A concert at Camp
Custer is also being contemplated.
The men whose names appear in the
following list have been admitted to
membership in the club. The list is
incomplete as the eligibility commit-
tee has not yet reported. Tenors:
Robert M. Allen, '18L, T. S. Barrett,
'18M, P. W. Beaver, '18M, W. E. Cole,
'20, J. L. Driscoll, '18, J. H. Failing,,
'20, E. J. Kricker, '20, W. F. Pellow,
'20L, G. E. Roop, grad., L. H. Scott, '18,
J. V. Tracy, '20E, E. C. Upton, '20, H.
P. Wagner, '20, R. Boes, '20, C. F.
Boos, '18, C. W. Good, '18E, Fred,
Goudry, '20M, N. D. Ireland,'18, Joe
Palma, '20M, G. B. Riker, '20D, W. R.q
Stark, '19, F. W. Sullivan, Jr., '18,
Jaynes Tuttle, '20, C. F. Wills, special.-
.Basses: (, R. Byrne, '19, W. Gay, '18E,]
R. B. Gotfredson, ?8, M. G. Hedin, '18,
Chester Lawton, '18, L. A. Lundquist,.
'19, C. P. Martzolf, '20, D. T. McKone,
'19L, H. D. Reed, '20, S. J. Shipman,7
'19M, R. D. Smithm, '20, F. H. Tins-l
man, 'I8D, J. F. Walker, '19E, C. R. Os-;
ius, '20, I;. Willard-Jones, '18E, L. R.1
Van Ness, '20, Fred Hawkey, '19, M. S..
Ballard, '20, Carl Barton, '20E, N. B.j
Bartz, special, R. R. Dieterle, '18, H.
M. Eaeley, '1§L, Arthur Heuer, '18, E.1
T. Jones, '19, PA4. R. , mpf., 'PQ 9 4
Lawrence, '20, P. M. Moo e, 10, G. 1.
Rogers, '20E, H, J. fthlge, '2QE, 34 W.
Scofield, '20.
U. S. TO INQUIRE WHY MUCK
REFUSES TO PLAY "0, SAY"
Washington, Nov. 3.-The artistic
sensibilities of Dr. Carl Muck, leader
of the Boston Symphony orchestra,
who refuses to play "The Star Spa4ge
led Banner," may become somewhat
ruffled, as the result of a quiet inves-
tigatio W'hich has been ordered by thes
department of justice. The depart-
ment of justice agents will look behinda
the refusal in the part of the orches-
tra leader. If it should be show 4, pr
example, that Dr. Muck is a Germa
sympathizer he could be placed in al
detention camp.
U. S. SAILOR FLEES VESSEL
TO LEAUN "ALTAR STEPS"

Washington, Nov. 3.-Berlin's an-
nouncement today that, "North Ameri-
can" soldiers were captured by Ger-
man patrols on the French front,
brought the American people a step
;nearer the heart of the conflict.
There is no doubt that the men refer-
red to are members of Pershing's
forces undergoing final training with
French regiments in the front line
of trenches: Confirmation by General
Pershing is lacking, but in the course
of time the names of those missing
will be forwarded.
If, as is assumed, small scouting
parties are takesn by the German pa-
trols in No Man's Land and all are
captured the details may never be told,
since only captors and captured know
what has happened in the darkness.
This is the first report received of'
the capture of American soldiers, but
a number of naval gunners from ship,
sunk by submarines in addition to civ-
ilians and crews are held in German
'prisons.
No night passes but that the patrols
on many parts of the battle lines hap-1
pen on each other. Sometimes there
'is firing, but seldom. Trench lines with
rifles, machine guns, and star rockets,
which are ready to burst at the first
hint of danger hang over both friend
and foe. Usually when the enemy pa-
trol is seen, the soldier stalks stealth-.
ily behind. The time comes, the sur-1
prise is made. Swift, silent, hand-to-
hand, is the fight, but there are no
shots fired. The victor carries away
his prisoners and the report goes out
in the enemy camp that so many men
from the patrol are missing.1
Officers believe this is what is hap-z
pening on the French and American
fronts.c
AMERICAN FIIHTING PLANE 1
MAKES SUCCESSFUL FLIGHT

In a session of the men's committees
and canvassers for the Friendship war
fund campaign for Y. M. C. A. work in
prison camps, to be held in Lane hall
at 6:30 o'clock, Sunday evening, plans
for a $25,000 drive among the students
of the University will be outlined.
The faculty and women's commit-
tees will not meet Sunday but will
plan their work separately. Nearly
200 men are expected to join in the
discussion. They will include the
house-to-house canvass and fraternity
committees,
No One Has Refused to Help
"No one has turned us down on the
proposition of agreeing to help," de-
clared Mr. N. C. Fetter, secretary of
the campaign.
Four questions will be explained at
the conference, Sunday: What the
campaign is will be told by Mr. Fetter;
"Who are doing it," by Cyril Harris,
curator of Hobart Guild, and "How,"
by the Rev. Lloyd C. Douglas. The
Reverend Douglas is pastor of the
Congregational church and was sec-
retary of the publicity campaign for
the national committee on the Friend-
ship war fund in New York. Edwin
Cunliffe, '19, will answer questions re-
lative to the drive in the University.
No subscriptions are to be taken.
The call for the meeting was issuedJ
by the executive committee: ;S. S.
Attwood, '18E; George F. Hurley, '18L;
Robert McDonald, '18; Merle B. Doty,
'18E.
Colleges Responding Well
"The colleges of the country are
responding better than the national
committee expected," said the Rev.
Douglas when questioned about the
million dollar campaign for Y. M. C.
A. war work among students. "Notj
only are the eastern colleges and uni-
versities setting a pace for their fel-
lows, but they are also raising the
quota of the campaign."
General Pershing, with the Ameri-
can expeditionary forces in France,
said
"The work now being done by the
Y. M. C. A. for the comfort and en-
tertainment of our soldiers is very
important. An an organization its
moral influence is highly beneficial.
It performs a real service that makes
for contentment. The Y. M. C. A. hasI
won its place by unselfish personal de-.
votion to the soldiers' welfare and de-{
serves staunch s4pport by our peo-t

GENEBACH AN]
FIGURE IN I
Weston, .*Outstanding
More Than 3001
Foes Territ(
Michigan's powerful

DUES MORE THAN $12 SUBJECT
TO 10 PER CENT FEDERAL
ASSESSMENT
Fraternity initiation fees and dues
in excess of $12 may be subject to a
10 percent tax according to a recent
act passed by Congress,
Michigan University fraternities are
for the most part uncertain as to
whether they come under the law or
not. Several were approached rela-
tive to the matter and stated that they
had received no notification either
from the government or their national
chapters to the effect that the tax ap-
plied to them.
Alpha Tau Omega fraternity said
that they had been notified by their
national headquarters to collect 10
percent from every initiate and mem-
ber paying dues or fees in excess of
$12. The money will be refunded
should the law not apply.
The new t'ax, which went into ef-
fect Nov. 1, is part of the war revenue
bill, which has taxed so many luxuries
and increased postage as war meas-
ure.
In some universities of the country,
the tax was avoided by paying yearly
dues before Nov. 1. It was not done
here to any great extent, for a good
many of the fraternities and sororities
had heard nothing of the tax,
The revenue from the 50 or more.
fraternities in the University will be
considerable, it is said, should the tax
apply to them as social organizations.
* The section of the act is as follows:
Sec. 701, That from and after the
first day of November, 1917, there shall
be levied, assessed, collected, and
paid, a tax equivalent to 10 per-
centum of any amount paid as dues
or membership fees (including initi-
ation), to any social, athletic, or
sporting club or organization, where
such dues are in excess of $12 per
year; such taxes to be paid by the
person paying such dues or. fees.
Section 702 requires the club to
collect the taxes provided for in sec-
tion 701.
GRANT QUOTA
Michigan Allowed to Send 25 Men to
Next Officers' Camp

chine mowed down the Kala
lege eleven yesterday after
score of 62 to 0.
From start to finish the V
tarried the battle to the up-i
The decision was never in d
moment and from the
Wieman carried the ball
the first few minutes of
til Weston sprinted acros
line as the closing whistle
ing, Michigan held the uppe
Michigan's eleven, with (
at right end the only man ii
up who did not start-againi
ka last week, showed the sa
of attack that was shown
Cornhuskers attempted to ti
into the cog-wheels of t
Therewas a smash to the at
stone wall appearance to t
that delighted the Michigai
and fans and took the heart
Kalamazoo players.
Weston, Michigan's mig
tlest quarterback was the oa
star of the game. Never di
boy fail to gain when he tool
and in all his gains totalled
300 yards of opponents' terr
longest run came at the el
game and was 65 yards in lei
other smashes netted merel
yards apiece.
Weston Runs Team In Fin
In addition to running wit
about as he pleased, Westo
team in perfect style. Michi
was primarily responsible f
of the holes through which
igan backs plunged, but We
be given credit for finding
spots in the Kalamazoo d
which to aim his attack.
The Wolverines resorted t
football and the touchdowns
er long runs down the field
stant series of line smashes
azoo held several times for
so when a touchdown mas
but the Michigan men were
denied their points, and sco
ed score in rapid succession.
All of the backfield men
into the game performed in
style. Froemke didn't make
90-yard runs, but by jump
fumbled punt. when it roll
bounds on Kalamazoo's one-
he did bring about a substa:
of some 60 yards and place
in position for Michigan'
touchdown.
Genebach, Hanish, and C
made large gains. Hanish wi
from the contest early by inj
:Genebach replaced him. T
more tore off large chunks o
and twisted his way out of mi
ers' grasps before being dow
several runs. Cruse plowed
the line for steady gains wb
upon.
Wieman again held up his
two man Weston-Wieman att
igan specializes in this y
"Tank" plowed through t
plunged off tackle, skirted'
forward passed, punted, or g
er touchdowns wh *his ac
skill. Wieman missed but o
goal after the nine touchdow
gan scored, and although on
did make came as a result c
the ball striking the goal p
* (Continued on Page Th

(By Associated Press)
' Brish naval operations were today
%uccessf'ul in the Kattegat, an arm of
tl'e North Sea, between Sweden and
De amark.
Op te Germai .uxiliary cruiser, arm-
ed wth six-inch guns, and 10 armed
Germain patrol boat were destroyed
without the loss of I single British
boat. INews dispatches fr'O Copen-
hagen .tell e the destructiO of the
German auxrfary cruiser, the %arie
of Flerstiurg by the British deStfOY-
era with ,the lase of 30 killed and
large nmber woua d.
The Marie, a 3000 ton vessel, met
the British destroyers 12 miles north
of Kullen. She immediately opened
fire, which was answered by the de-
stroyers, and in 10 minutes the Marie
was ablaze.
Of the 81 members of her crew, ac-
cording to reports, 30 were killed and
the others took to the boats. Seven
wounded sailors subsequently were
rescued by Danish ships. 'They were
landed last night.

Washington, D. 0, Nov. $.-The
first fighting airplane wholly made In
America of American materials has
taken the air in successful test flights.
In making this fact known today offi-
cials of the aircraft production board'
said few changes in the design of eith-
er the plane or the "Liberty motor"
are believed necessary, apd that pr9
duction in quantity of the fighting
machines soon will be in progress in
many factories.
By the first of the new year it is ex-
pected that the aircraft program will
be well under way, and by 4iuly 1 the
government expects to be able to sup-
ply any demands of its allies. Ma-
chines which United States forpes in
Europe will need when spring co es
are being built abroad,
American engineers expect that the
aircraft program can be made what-
ever the allies require. Originally the
figures were set at 50,000 motors and
22,000 planes by July 1,

ple at home."
George McMahon, '16, recently re-
turned from France in the Y. M. C. A.
service, will speak at the mass meet-
ing to be held Nqv. 14. Phases of
the association's work in the camps of
Europe will be part of his talk,
"Now that the first Americans have
been taken by the Germans, it will be
well to note that the American Y. M.
C. A. is the only recognized institu-
tion in the land of the kaiser that will
Sammies and the United States," de-
serve as any connection between the
Glared Mr. Fetter.

.Pittslurg, Pa., Nov. 3.-Andrew
Dilks, Aged 19, of Millville, N. J., a
sailor from the U. S. S. Minnesota,
was arrested here today in company
with "Dolly" Riggins of South Vine-
1e. 1T. J. The girl said that 'Dilks
brought r here from Millville. Dilks
was held as a deserter.
Cercle Francals Not to Meet Tomorrow
Members of the Cercle Francais and
their invited guests will not meet to-
morrow night as was previously an-
nounced in The Daily. The announce-
ment was an error n the meeting,
which will be social I its natu, will
be held one week from tompurraw
night, on Monday evening, Nov. 1%,

Y

1 . J

ii

W4

Armenian, Syrian, and Greek

In response to a telegram sent to
Washington by President Harry B.
Hutchins, Michigan has been granted
a quota of 25 men for the next officers'
training camp at Camp Custer which
opens Jan. 5.
Applicants must see Lieut. G. C.
Mullen in regard to examinations.
Huns Double Troop Trains, Say Swiss
Geneva, Switzerland, Nov. 3.-Swiss
soldiers stationed on the Alpine
heights on the frontier in the canton
of Grisons; report that since Germans
captured Udine, the number of troop
trains going in the direction of Trent
has been doubled, The Swiss troops
say that when heavy artillery trains
are passing the Germans make smoke
curtains at exposed points to prevent
the number of guns being ascertained
by onlookers.

Ees inTurkey
Sunday Evening 7:30, Presbyterian Church
Address by Dr. 3. K. Mardin

0

I

FREE

LECTU RE

TOD.
3 o'cl

Everybody
Welcome

ON

CH RISTIA

SCIE

CE

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