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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 03, 1917 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-11-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


Te St-Boh Ca.. L911

Imagine
Yourself
if you 're a
"live one "--

ILLINOIS FACULTY MEN
NOW FACING DISMISSAL
PROFESSORS ARE CHARGED WITH
OPPOSITION TO WAR
WORK

BOCK[S DISINTEGRATING,
OR ELSE KAISER TO RULE

"ALMOST IMPOSSIBLE FOR
LING TO HOLD TWO
FIDE S."-CRANE

IGAN DAILY Pu

HERT.
OF-

f uri (St I
,
A 4
yJ.YO
+
.
. .
, i

ROSES FOR KINDLY SENTIME
always. No girl can receive a bun
of our beauties without a very kini
feeling for the sender. We will mas
up a bunch of any size you say a
deliver it to any address at any tin
Our flowers are fresh daily and w
a little care will keep so for seve:
days.
MacDiarmid Box Candles Fresh
Daily.
L AN DE RS
OF R". S 213E.Liberty
LOWERS Phone 294

in this 3-button

STEIN-BLOCH
Coat!

No padding--no stiffen-
ing--nothing but honest
'fabric, hand tailoring
and "style galore."

Prices $20 to $40

Lindenschmitt, Apfel Co.

TYPEWRITERS
For Sale and Rent
TYPE WRITING
Mimeographing,
aternity and Social Stationery
0. D. MORRILL
322 South State Street
its antyhing Photo-
phic ask SWAIN
East University Ave.
STOP AT
TUTTLE S
338 MAYNARD
For Lunches and Sodas
.of M. RESTAURANT
Quick, Polite
SERVICE
Special Meals at all Hours

-for-
Kodak Finishing
Groups, Camppus Views. Best
results. Prompt service. Let us
enlarge your favorite negative.

334 S. State St.

Phone 2446-JI

Charged with disloyalty to the gov-
ernment, eight members of the Univer-
sity of Illinois faculty face dismissal.
After concluding an investigation of
alleged anti-Americanism which in-
cluded alleged opposition to the Liber-
ty Loan, Red Cross activities and other
war work, W. H. Kerrick of Bloom-
ington, Ill., an agent of the depart-
ment of justice, summoned several
faculty members to appear for examin-
ation.
Among those who appeared were Dr
A. C. Cole assistant professor of his-
tory, Dr. Queen Shepherd, instructor
in philosophy, and Dr. Richard Chase
Tolman, professor of chemistry. Cam-
illo Weiss, instructor in philosophy,
was summoned but did not appear.
Weiss, it is said signed a registration
card for the draft as an "alien enemy."
According to charges by Mr. Ker-
rick, those who appeared before him
laughed, sneered, and practically defi-
ed the government by refusing to ans-
wer his questions. 1
It has just become known that last
summer the board of trusteesdropped
from its faculty four instructors for
anti-Americanism. The leader of this
band was Carl Hessler, an instructor
in philosophy and president of the uni-
versity Socialist club. It has been
common talk about the university that
there is a 'small squad of Socialists,
and .other so-called philosophers, who
are opposing the war in a negative way
at least by refusing to co-operate in
any manner with patriotic movements.
Agent Kerrick held a conference
with President James before leaving
the city. Kerrick expressed himself
to the effect that the instructors under
suspicion should be dismissed.
Itaise M ore Hogs
Washington Plea
UnitedStates Must Produce More
Meat For Allied Armies and Ci-
ilian Population
Washington, D. C., Nov. 2.-More
meat is necessary to win the war. To
meet the situation quickly hog pro-
duction must be meaterially increased
throughout the cbuntry.
We must have plenty of meat for
our armies and the armies of our al-
lies in the field, and we must take care
of our civilian population. Pork can
be transported more readily, and more
economically, to troops in the field
than any other meat.
While there is a demand for more
meat as a war measure, it must be con-
sidered that we now have an abun-
dance of feed crops,-corn, oats, and
barley-that farmers could profitably
use in raising hogs to market on
foot.
The increase needed for the entire
country is 15 per cent.
In the face of this increasing need
it is estimated that the number of
hogs is 4,000,000 less than it was a
year ago.
In view of the high prices of hogs
and thelarge crop of foodstuffs in
sight, it is believed that farmers will
make every reasonable effort to in-1
crease the supply of pork.'
WAR COST TO BRITISH
NOW TOTALS 5,692,000,000

I

GEORGE 5iSCklOFN' J
FLORIST
Choie Cutf lowers ad Plants
220 Captin.St. Phone 809-M

"Either the German government is
disintegrating, or the kaiser is plan-
ning on taking things into his own
hands," said Prof. Robert Crane of the
economics department today In speak-
ing of von Hertling's proposed chan-
cellorship of Germany.
"Von Herning is a Bavarian and
it is practically impossible for him to
be made chancellor for the empire and
prime minister of Prussia with all the
powers that that title signifies. Such a
condition could only mean that the
German government is disintegrat-
ing," declared Professor Crane in con-
tinuing the discussion.
Professor Crane admitted that the
situation was a peculiar one though
the kaiser is strictly within his con-
stitutional rights by so taking the
power into his own hands, since he
alone appoints the chancellor, who
in turn is responsible to him alone.
There is always -a possible ques-
tion as to whether the chancellor or
the kaiser will hold actual power, and
while the kaiser has for a long time
pursued a policy of intervention in
all affairs, such a complete control as
the new situation promises justifies
all theories that this is a war between
democracy and autocracy," asserted
Professor Crane.
ANN ARBOR OPENS
FOOD SAVING DRIVE
I
Conservation- Pledge Cards Given
Residents To Report
Progress
A wide campaign of food conserva-
tion is being conducted in Ann Arbor
through the schools and churches.
Pledge cards have been distributed to
the children to be signed by the moth-
ers promising to help in the conserva-
tion of our food supply. At the
same time weekly. reports are being
received from the families by the
churches, giving the number of wheat-
less and meatless days held and the
approximate amount saved.
In commenting upon this campaign,
Rev. J. W. Wells of the First Baptist
church said:
"The morale of the French soldiers
depends on the morale of the women
of France. The women have shown
their spirit by encouraging their hus-
bands to enlist and fight for their
country. The responsibility now lies
upon the United States to keep up this
spirit by supplying them with plenty
to eat. The soldiers ,as well as the
civilians of France, should be forti-
fied with decent bread."
WEST INDIES QUIET; MARINES
REQUEST OVERSEAS SERVICE
Washington, Nov. 3.-After receiv-
ing their baptism of fire in the fights
and campaigns incident to the estab-
lishment of good government in
Haiti and SanDomingo, United States
Marine veterans, now serving in those
countries, are straining at the leash
in eagerness to take up arms with
their brothers overseas. Headquar-
ters here has received many letters
from marines in Haiti requesting their
transfer to the battle front in France.
Peace is now thoroughly established
in the West Indian republics, and the
sea-soldiers are tiring of the compar-
ative quiet of the various posts where
they are serving.

Union News

Near to everyone
620 E. LIBERTY

HEADQUARTERS

r
Try the
Fountain of Youth
for your Candies-both boxed and plain
We make a specialty of light lunches. Call and try
them at
The Fountain of Youth
Corner of State and E. Liberty

"Mum" for the Cornell Game. Corsages for the par
Leave your orders early, we'll deliver them.
102 S.
Cousins' &rgall I ?AV
Members of the Florists' Telegraph Delivery Association

5,ft.(I RE.
-'7I

lR GOVERNMENT AND H. C.
OF L. HELP FARMERS' SHOW
[oledo, Nov. 1.-A pretentious col.
tion of farm products and agricul-
al appliances will be shown at the
irth annual meeting of the National
mers' exposition to be held in the
minal auditorium Dec. 5 to 15.
'his year the display will far sur-
is that of previous years, because
the impetus given the work by the
ited States government in urging
farmers to raise larger crops to
the allies in the present war.
the National farmers' exposition
, organized four years ago with the
a of reducing the high cost of liv-
by producing larger crops. H. V.
Blow, managing director of the fair
's that he is besieged with appli-
ions from various organizations and
titutions for space to show their
>ds. The mamouth auditorium bids
r to be filled to capacity. Every
iceivable work of the farm and
isehold of interest either to men or

women will be shown. Free lectures
accompanied by motion pictures will'
be given daily by agricultural ex-
perts for the benefit of those who
want to learn more abotit husbandry
With the display of previous years
at hand, the present display is ex-
pected to show what has been ac-
complished under the stress of war.
English Coal Mines to Last 80 Years
London, Nov. 3.-After 14 years of
preliminary work costing over $2,000,-
000, coal mining operations are about
to begin on a deposit of coal at Ker-
esley, England. The output is ex-
pected to reach more than a million
tons a year and to last 80 years. It
will be the largest coal mining pro-
perty in Warwickshire and the near-
est to the London market. Four seams
have been located. Their depth is
about 2,100 feet below the surface, and
their thickness about 23 feet.
Correction
In yesterday's Michigan Daily, it was
stated that Henry Ford, president of
the Saxon Motor company, had offered
his new plant to the government for
the duration of the war. Harry Ford
is the president of the Saxon Motor
company instead of Henry Ford. Henry
Ford is the president of the Ford
Motor company of Detroit..

Nearly all of the teams for the fol-
low-up membership campaign have
been selected. There are, however, a
few more vacancies, and applicants for
these should communicate at once with
Richey B. Reavill, '19, general chair-
man. Union opera and other desira-
ble committee appointements will be
made largely from those who work
in this campaign.
All arrangements have been com-
pleted for the big Union membership
dance which will be held after the Cor-
nell game on Nov. 10, in the combined
gymnasiums. Preparations are being
made to accomodate 500 couples.
Waterman gymnasium is to be used
for dancing, and Barbour as a recep-
tion hall and dining room, where the
collegiate alumnae will serve refresh-
ments. Shook's 12-piece orchestra
will furnish music'from 8:30 to 11:30
o'clock. Tickets will be placed on
sale Thursday, Nov. 8, at the Union
desk.
Four performances of the Union op-
era will be given in Ann Arbor on
March 12, 13, 14, and 15, a matinee
being held on the afternoon of the
last day. Battle Creek has booked
two performances, one for the civil-
ians and the other for the soldiers
at Camp Custer. Other cities are ne-
gotiating for presentations.

MODEL C

1*

*4

#my

I-
tf

it
UN G

jLuave Copy
at
students,
SupPly Store

A

WANTED
lNTED-Foreigner, man wants in-
truction in English by good rhetor-
c student, at his home or student's
ome. Good enunciation essential.
tate qualifications and prices.
Vrite Daily, Box Q.
NTED-A violinist and saxophone
layer for orchestra work. 1050-J.
FOR RENT
R RENT-Good rooms at 609 Mon-
oe. One suite for 3 men, one suite
or 2 and a single. Army stores men
aken. Mrs. Schumacher.
R RENT-Try the Daily at renting

LOST
LOST- Locket-watch charm, initials
W. B. M. on North side of campus
Return to Daily office. Reward.
Box O.
LOST-Fountain pen with gold band
having initials L. C. Phone 885-M.
LOST - A Conklin self-filling pen.
Phone 96-M.
MISCELLANEOUS .
SUPERIOR BOARD Armstrong House,
1212 So. Univ. Ave. One block from
Eng. Bldg. $5.00 per week in ad-
vance or $18.50 four weeks in ad-
vance. Phone 2495.'
WILL THE person who found an Ec-
onomics I book with the name and
phone number on inside cover notify
Mark E. Gunville. Phone 990-J.
WILL BOARD two girls. Also have
pleasant room four blocks from
Campus. Box P, Daily.

London, Nov. '3-A request for a
1400,000,000 war credit and a state-
mnt of war expenditures from July 22
to Sept. 22, has been received by the
British house ,of commons from An-
drew Bonar Law, chancellor of the ex-
chequer. The cost of the-war during
the two months was shown to be about
$32,070,000 per day. The new loan,
which will undoubtedly be voted, will
last until January, brings the total for
the year to 11,900,000,000 and the ag-
gregate for the war to 15,692,000,000.
Yale has a war library of maga-
zines, papers, and pamphlets gathered
from Europe. since hte war began. It
is considered very valuable.
Hoppe for flashlight pictures. Kodak
dept., Nickels Arcade.-Ad
Will there

Coal Waste is Billion Tons Annually
London, Nov. 3.- "Of the world's
coal mined, 1,235,000,000 tons is wast-
ed in heat radiation and other losses,"
was the statement recently made by
L. C. Harvey, during the course of a
talk on "Fuel Economy."
In 1910 the amount of coal mined
in the world was about 1,300,000,000
tons and according to Mr. Harvey it
was improbable that anything like
five per cent was ever turned into act-
ual useful work.
Girls of Ohio State have discontin-
ued buying luxuries, so that they
may give their money to the "Y" war
fund.
be a VICTROLA in

The opera will not make its trip
during spring vacation as last year.
The Glee club's .out-of-town concerts
are slated for this period, so the
mimes have scheduled their itinerary
for two week ends shortly after the
local performances.
Final announcement of the person-
nel of the minor committees for 1917-
18 is being withheld, pending the re-
port of the eligibility committee, and
ajso of the board of directors con-1
cerning the creation of new commit-
tees.
Thirteen hundred and forty-two men
have signed up on the Union member-
ship book so far this year. Records
indicate that there are still about
45 other men who have taken out mem-
berships but who have not signed up
and received their buttons.
C. 0. D. RULE TO APPLY TO
XAIL DEFICIENT IN POSTAGE
The new postage schedule went intt,
effect after 12 o'clock Thursday night..
All letters and postal cards that came
to the main office after that time were
assessed under the new rating and the
amount due will collected upon de-
livery.
The Ann Arbor' postoffice is well
supplied with three cent stamps, but
will continue selling the one cent post-
al cards and two cent stamped envel-
opes until a large enough supply can
be manufactured at the government
printing office at Washington. An ad-
ditional one cent stamp will have to
be affixed to the old cards and envel-
opes, except on drop cards mailed
from the main office.
Officers' Uniforms and accessories
G. H. Wild & Co., State Street.-Adv

The newest Patrick Model
Double breasted, shawl colla
pleated back, half belt, two si
pockets; sizes 36 to 46.
Made from the famous PE
rick-Duluth all wool cloth. T
yarns are spun from the ne
wool in their own mill and t
coats are made in a miodel da,
light sanitary factory. Each co
guaranteed.
Next to Orpheum Theatre
SEE U.S.
When in the market for Lun
ber, Sash, Doors, Interi
Finish, Office Fixtures, at
Special Mill work.

JOHN J SAUER
310 W. Liberty Street
Phony 2484 or 825-M

w

New Chinese
LAUNDRY
Now open at
1115 S. University
Work called for and
delivered
Telephone 1331-W
YEE flING, Prop.

your home this Christmas?

RASY TERMS

SALE
nond Multiplex type-!
unning order. Rea-I

Lyndon's for I
Films. Open 8
4-30 only.-Adv.

GRINNELL BROS.
116 So. Main Street

Dancing at

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