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November 02, 1917 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-11-02

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

/

11 and Winter Styles
BORSALINO HATS

Extra Light Weight
NOW ON DISPLAY

. .

I

Wadhams & Co.

TWO STORES

FOOD ADMSTRATORS
F R 4 IIS ATRRECEIVE CO-OPERATION
GOVERNMENT ATTEMPTS TO PRE-
VENT LARGE PROFITS AND
SPECULATION
All dealers and manufacturers of
staple foods, except small retailers,
must be licensed by the federal food
administration.
This action was taken for several
reasons: First, to limit prices and to
forbid speculative profits; second, to
keep all foods moving with as little
delay as possible to the consumer;
third, to limit dealings in future de-
livery and contracts. The penalty
for selling or manufacturing the fol-
lowing food products contrary to this
law is a fine of $5,000 or two years
imprisonment: Beef, pork, mutton,
poultry, eggs, butter, cheese, flour,
sugar, cereals, lard, beans, peas, fruit,
vegetables, several kinds of canned
goods, and some other foods.
Small retailers, though not licensed,
will not be allowed to make excessive
profits or to hoard food for specula-
tion. According to regulations con-
cerning wholesalers, they will be
obliged to refuse to sell to retailers
who charge exorbitant prices for.
their goods. Those engaged in hand-
ling food with few exceptions have
shown the greatest desire to co-oper-'
ate in this patriotic work. Already
50,000 applications for licenses have
been received and they continue to
reach Washington at the rate of 4,000
a day.

STATE STREET
COR. ARCADE

MAIN STREET
COR. WASHINGTON

CITY YW.CIA GIVES
C KWR SRVICE CLASSES
COURSES IN AUTOMOBILE DRIV-
ING AND REPAIRING, TELEG.
RAPHY AND KNITTING
Classes in automobile driving and
repairing have been organized at the
city Y. W. C. A. to teach Ann Arbor
women to take the places of drafted
men. The work is not for pleasure
seekers, but for those women who sin-
cerely desire to help the United States
government should necessity demand
it.
Fourteen girls have signed up for a
course in telegraphy which will be
added to the r'egular winter schedule
as soon as instruments arrive. There
is a great demand for operators and
the government urges that this occu-
pation be taken up seriously.
Other courses which will be of-
fered at the Y. W. C. A. this winter
are: Arithmetic, American history,
Bible study, French, home nursing,
millinery, English, knitting, gymnas-
ium work, and china painting.
Mr. Mack, of Mack and company,
has consented to have clases in arith-
metic and English for the girls in
his store every morning except Satur-
days.
FACULTY MEMBERS
ATTEND INSTITUTE
Professors Speak On Their Respective
SubJects.In Section
Meetings

For 30 Year the Beut

_Sults. and O'coat
- -Tailored to your
"4.Individual Style
- 7
Sweaters
Allwool Good dyes
FURNISHINGS
VARSITY TOGGERY SHOT

Calkins Drug
Company

324 S. State and
1123 S. University Am

-- n
r !

Football Pictures
Hot Chocolate and Soda after the Game

i

Drugs, Soda, Kedaks, Candles

f -__-

CURTIS'
TIRES

mamm

I.

Dontlet,

Built by Hand

.I

Write direct to the Factory
for prices
VULCANIZED
PRODUCTS
Muskegon, Mich.

MARQUARD
C!AMPUS TAILOR
be your outfitter unless you
want the Best WooiUns.
Accurate Fit, and Guar-
anteed Satisfaction.

k

;I

Try the

Fountain of Youth
for your Candies-both boxed and plain
We make a specialty of light lunches. Call and try
them at
The Fountain of Youth
Corner of State and E. Liberty

J

Q / / ESFA
IIX1lI111
TjHE road to Laundry Satis-
faction leads to our address.
The easiest way to insure the
proper conditioning of your
clothes is to send us your soiled
linen and we will return it to
you refreshed and renewed. A
MOE LAUNDRY
Phone 2355 204 No. Main St.
FOR
EVERYTHING
ELECTRICAL
No Job too Small or too Large
WASHTENAW
ELECTRIC SHOP
"The Shop of Quality"
If It's not right we make it right
-PHONE 278 -

L. C. SMITH, I
CORONA,
UNDERWOOD
and other high
grade type-
-writers.
FOR SALE
and RENT
Fraternity and Social Stationery
MIMEOGRAPHING and PRINTINC
TYPEWRITING
0. D. MORRILL
322 South State St.
(Over Baltimore Lunch)
SHORTHAND
TYPEWRITING
BOOKKEEPING
PENMANSHIP
Classes Just Starting. Enroll
Today
HAMILTON
BUSINESS COLLEGE
State and William

SEWAGE DISPOSAL
CREATES PROBLEM

State

Officials Expect to Stop Pra -
tice of Using Streams
for Purpose

Lansing, Mich., Nov. 1.-That the
time is coming when no company or
municipality will be allowed to dump
sewage, chemicals or other refuse in-
to the streans of the state was the
opinion today of Deputy Attorney Gen-
eral Thomas G. Baillie, in discussing
the problem of the E. I. Dupont De
Nemours Powder company, which was
enjoined from emptying chemical re-
fuse into the Au Sable and Saginaw,
rivers to the detriment of the health
of fish of that stream.
Already the supreme court has up-
held the state's right to enforce em-
ployment of sewage disposal plants
by municipalities and forced their in-
stallation at Grand Rapids.
In the case of the powder company,
because of its important function, the
Enforcement of the injunction was
held in abeyance pending solution of
the difficulty. Twenty-five hundred'
chemists of the company, a state chem-
ist, and engineer are at work on the.
problem. Four varieties of filters
have failed to segregate the unknown
chemical released by the flushing of
charcoal. Evaporation, which would
require the disposition of 6,000 gal-]
lons daily is considered unfeasable. I
LATE EUROPEAN TRAVELERS
WELCOME AT WHITE HOUSE1

Several faculty members of the Uni-
versity are attending the annual
state teachers convention, yesterday
and today, at Grand Rapids.
The conference will consist of gen-
eral meetings and department ses-
sions. At the former Prof. David.
Snedden of Columbia, J. L. McBrien
from the Washington bureau of edu-
cation, and two prominent clergymen
from New York City will speak on
methods of education.
At the sectional meetings the fol-
lowing men of the literary college
faculty will talk to teachers of their
respective subjects: President H. B.
Hutchins, Dean J. R. Effinger, Prof A.
R. Crittendon, Prof. T. E. Rankin,
Prof. A. S. Whitney, Prof. C. 0. Davis,
Prof. G. L. Jackson, Prof. F. W. Kel-
sey, Prof. A. G. Canfield, Prof. J. R.
Brumm, Mr. J. B. Edmonson, Mr. E. D.
Mitchell, and Prof. W. H. Hobbs.
Union News_

.

is the reason so many people urefer Arnold's Optical System when th
eyes need glasses.
We measure Your eyes. tell you what kind of glasses you need a
supply the kind that fit and feel comfortable.
The completeness of our system lies in proper fitting and maki
of your glasses. all at one price, so that you get Better Glasses at 1E
cost.

RUGS
ROPS
ANGER

EMIL H. ARNOLD

OPTOMETRIST-OPTICIAN
With Arnold and Co.. Jewelers
220 S. Main Street

Try our Chop Suey
Chinese and American Dishes

WAS KING LOO
Joe Gin, Prop.

314 S. State St.

Phone 1244-M1

R
w

adla Military c R Fountain Pen
Nrist Watches Waterman
4.25 to $21 and ConKUi
U. of M. Jewelry
Schlanderer & Seyfried

na
In

200 E. Washington
Ann Arbor

117 Pearl
Ypsilanti

HOLLAND OBJECTS TO MINISTER'
WHO, DESIRES BIG WAR BUDGET
The Hague, Nov. 1.--Much comment
has been caused in Holland by a
speech of the new civilian war minis-
ter, Bernard Cornelis de Jonge, in
which he said that, if the country were
to be properly defended after the war,
Hollanders would have to reconcile
themselves to a war budget of some-
thing like $24,000,000 instead of $12,-
000,000, as formerly. He is criticizedI
for the lack of faith in the attainment
of the general reduction of armaments
at the end of the war. Critics argue '

that, as Holland could never hope to
successfully resist an attack by one
of her big neighbors, she must confine
herself to adequate preparations to
defend her neutrality.
Lowry Heads Freshman Glee Club
Harold J. Lowry, '21, was elected
president and general manager of the
Freshman Glee club at Wednesday's
meeting.
Membership for the club will close
next week. About sixty are now meet-
ing every Wednesday night at the
School of Music, where they practice
the Michigan songs. They plan to
sing at various smokers and other so-
cial events during the year.

President Wilson Eager To Learn
Conditions In Europe and
War Attitude -

Of

Special rates to Philadelphia and
Chicago for the Pennsylvania and
Northwestern games have been secur-
ed by the Union.
The fare to and from Philadelphia
will be $30.44, exclusive of pullman
charges. The regular rate is $35.68
Pullman costs forone way will amount
to $4.40 or $3.52, depending on wheth-
er lower or upper berth is taken.
The rate to Chicago and back will
be $12.82, Pullman charges excluded.
The regular fare is $12.96. Sleeping
car charges for one way will amount
to $2.20 or $1.76, according to selection
of lower or upper berth. This fare is
only to Chicago, from which Evanston
may be reached by elevated, street
car, or railroad.
The party rates are effective only
if 10 or more sign up for each trip.
All students who wish to go are asked
to turn in their names to the clerk at
the Union desk.
Schedules of departure and arrival

1
i
t
t
l

HOLLAND HARD PRESSED FOR
FUEL; COAL RATIONS GIVEN
The Hague, Oct. 25.-(Correspond-'
ence.)-Hollanders are using "hay box-
es" or home-made fireless cookers, to
save the diminishing supply of coal.
These articles are ordinary wooden
boxes thickly lined with hay, but in
some cases a heavy padding of news-
paper is used for packing.

,Men who have made observations in
Europe within the last few weeks
are now welcome visitors at the White
House. These people find themselves
closely questioned when they meet,
President Wilson. The President
seems to be very anxious about feel-
ing in Europe regarding the war.
The President seeks full informa-
tion as to how Europeans regard the
war, how they talk, and the strength
of their determination to win. So far,
most of the answers seem to indicate'
that civilians in France, England,
Russia, Italy, and the other allied
countries want a war "to a finish."
Riots as reported by cable from ene-
my countries are said to be caused
by small groups of people, and to rep-
resent the spirit of the nation no more
than the few cases of draft resistance

will be issued later.
Another scenario fir the Union op-
era has been turned in. It is asked
that students who have scenarios in
hand file them at once with the presi-
dent.
The board of directors will meet
at 11:30 o'clock Thursday morning.
G. L. Ohrstrom, ex-'18, Visits City
G. L. Ohrstrom, ex-'18, now a cadet
at the aviation field at Dayton, was
in Ann Arbor Thursday. Ohrstrom is
now finishing his flying tests for a
commission at the training school. He
was business manager of the Students'
Directory last year.

Apy

ad
3-b

n

r r

iL

It.0Ve Copy
at
Students'
Supply Stave

In many towns the bakers are con-
centrating in a few central establish-
ments. Public kitchens seem likely to
become a general institution in the
coming winter, not only among the
poor, but among the more well-to-do.
A coal rationing system has been in
force in Holland for some time, the
amount apportioned to each user be-
ing changed as the supply increases or
diminishes. Further economy in coal
consumption is inevitable. Railroad
traffic is again to be cut down. The
closing of factories for lack of fuel is
increasing and public lighting has
been reduced. The use of gas and
electric light is to be rationed through-
out Holland during the winter months.
The production of the country's own
coal mines is only a fifth of the nor-
mal consumption. The unrestricted
submarine war,coupled with condi-
tions imposed by Great Britain, al-
most entirely stopped the supply of
coal usually imported from the United
Kingdom. Germany some time since
cut down its coal deliveries to the
Netherlands to 350,000 tons a month.
The Germans offered to guarantee a
certain fixed coal supply again, but
intimated that if Holland wanted more
it should send Dutch labor to the Ger-
man mines to raise it. But it was
publicly declared by the government
that this was impracticable. Fear of
complications with the Entente Pow-
ers would alone probably suffice to
keep Holland from adopting this plan.
U. of M. Jewelry. J. L. Chapman,8
is tne place. 113 8. Main.-Adv.
Gasoline 23c, Polarine 50c. Staebler
& Co., 117 8. Ashley St-Ad'.

.A.

represent American patriotism.
Henry Ford has offered the new
Saxon automobile plant to the govern-
ment for the duration of the war. He
is president of the Saxon Motor com-
pany.

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jacksc
(Effective May 22, 1917)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-"":35
in. 8:xo a. in.. and hourly to 7:10-P.in.,9
p. m.~
Kalamazoo Limited Cars-8:48 a. nia
every two hours to 6:48 D. in.; to Lansl
8:48 p. M.
Jackson' Express Cars ,local stops west
Ann Arbor)9:48, a. in. and eve.y twoh
to-7:48 p. M.,
Local Cars East Bound--5:35 a. m.,
a. in.,7:0sa. in. and every two hoars to 7
P.. m... 8:o5 p. in.. 9:05 p. in., 10:50 P.
To Ypsilanti only, 9:20 a. in., 9:50 a
2:05 P. '..6:05 P. m, .945 p. m,11:45p
change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-6:os a. in., 7
"a. in.. 10:20 p., M., 12:20 a. in.
CJ~stJhop Suo'3
ClassV
RESTAVR.ANT
ICHIGAN INN
Phor. 948.,I 601 E. Liber
H its antyhing Photo
graphic ask SWAI
713 East University Av
STOP AT
338 MAYNARD
For Lunches and Sodas

Oh, Mr. Webb, Restrain You
London, Oct. 25.-Corresponde
"After the, war the world w
weary, cold, and hungry, and
are to avoid famine and revo
something will have to be do
once," said Sidney Webb, p
economist, in a speech at the L

LOST
10ST- Locket-watch charm, Initials
W, B, M. on North side of campus
Return to Daily office. Reward.
Box 0,

-Fountain pen
ng initials IU C.

with gold band
Phone 885-M.

FOR SALE
FOR SALE-Hammond Multiplex type-
writer, perfect running order. Rea-
son for selling; need the money.
Box 4, Daily.
MISCELLANEOUS
SUPERIOR BOARD Armstrong House,
1212 So. Univ. Ave. 'One block from
Eng. Bldg. $5.00 per week in ad-
vance or $18.50 four weeks in ad-
vance. Phone 2495.
WILL BOARD two girls. Also have
pleasant room four blocks from

... .

A STRONGER

School of Economics.
come suddenly and uii

"Peace

. . . I

- A Conklin3

Shoes repaired while you wait.
G. Andres, 222 S. State St.-Adv.

0.

self-filing pen.

guarantee could not be written.
It is unlimited in its scope and
duration.
SWEETEST TONE PIANO
IN THE WORLD
GRINNELL BROS.-
116 So. Main St.

then the world will be forced
a great shortage, signs of wh
already visible. The wheat st
the world are reduced to the s
amount ever known. Flocks an
all .over the world are greatly
ished. Even the pig is rapidly
pearing. Metals, coal, timber
and leather, and all building m;
are at famine scarcity."

'

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