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November 02, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-11-02

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I

CHE WEATHER
.RTLY CLOUDY-PROB-
ABLY WARMER

r B ian

tl

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT 'Wl
SERVICE

XXVIII. No. 28.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 1917.

PRICE THREE

._

LIAN ARMY IN
EW BATTLE INE
NAITS FOR ATTAC K

"HOOVER BANQUET"
CLOSES *CAMPAIGN

Washtenaiv

County Loan
Dine kt City
Y. M.C. A.

Solicitors

:YS QUICK ADVANCE
TO ENVELOPE RO.
MANS

FAILS

JTONS WIN 180,000-
MEN AND 1,500 GUNS

British Troops Take Beersheba, Cap-
turing 1,800 Germans and
Arabs
(By Associated Press)
London, Nov. 1.-The great portion
of General Cadorna's Italian army ap-
parently has crossed the Tagliamento
river and probably now stands on the
western bank in a new line of defense
waiting to give battle to the .Teutonic
allies.
The advance of the enemy, although
it has been remarkably fast, was not
quick enough to carry out the purpose
of the military commanders of envel-
oping the Italians and putting them
out of the battle from the Carnic
Alps to the head of the Adriatic Sea.
The Italians lost heavily in men
and guns captured, the latest German
commutication asserting that more
than 180,000 men and 1,500 guns were
taken by the Teutonic allies, and also
suffered terrible hardships due to bad
weather and lack of food, for they
made their way across the country to
the Tagliamento, with their rear
guards teverywhere harassing the en-
emy.
General Cadorna declares that with
the splendid morals of his men still
intact, the success of the invaders
soon will be made valueless. On the
eastern side of the Tagliamento, the
Teutonic allies have captured all along
the water way from Pizano to Latis-
ana, valuable bridge-head positions
from which to operate against the Ital-
ians on the other side of the stream.
Rome Optomistic
Washington, Nov. 1. - Reassuring
news came from Rome today in official
dispatches.
While serious, the situation on the
Italian front is described as far from
desperate, General Cadorna's army is
declared to be properly intact, a com-
plete confidence is expressed in his
ability, with aid coming from the al-
lies, to stop the Austro-German drive.
The cablegram summarizes the situa-
tion as follows:
"The military situation on the Ital-
ian front is serious, but it is far from
being desperate. Whatever the num-
ber of Italians taken prisoners, the
strength of the army of General Cad-
orna has not been weakened. It must
not be forgotten in fact, that Italy
has under the colors more than three
million men. The Italian army is
practically intact. Besides tlFrench
and English are coming to o rescue.
"The Italian press declares that the
battle which is about to take place
may be the last great battle of the
war."
On the battle front in France and
Belgium, little activity is being dis-
played.
The Petrograd war office re-
pets another withdrawal of the Ger-
man troops in the Riga region of the
north Russian front.
In Palestine, British troops have
captured the town of Beersheba, a
short distance southwest of Palestine,
and made prisoners of 1,800 Germans
and Arabs. They also took nine guns,
suffering slight losses to themselves
in the operation.
. L, D. Goodrich Receives Appointment
F. L. D. Goodrich, reference librar-
ian of the University, has been appoint-
ed librarian at Camp Wadsworth,
Spartansburg, S. C. Mr. Goodrich will
leave for Spartansburg sometime this

Washtenaw county Liberty Loan
campaign finally closed yesterday at
an enthusiastic "Hoover banquet" giv-
en the solicitors at the city Y. M. C.
A. Every'banker of the county was
present and helped to make it a suc-
cess.
George W. Miller, chairman of the
committee, reported that the county
slightly oversubscribed her quota.
Ann Arbor oversubscribed hers by
$350,000.
Frank Bacon, '02, reported that
tht students and faculty oversubscrib-
ed the amount they were asked for by
$125,000.
A vote of thanks was extended to
the Michigan Daily for the wide pub-
licity it has given the national loan.
In appreciation of the services ren-
dered by Mr. F. L. Pack, secretary of
the campaign, the committee awarded
him a $100 bond.
The committee decided to remain a
permanent organization under the
name of Washtenaw County Patriotic
Committee with George W. Millen as
president; Fred Gallop,, vice-presi-
dent; Thomas A. Lowry, treasurer;
Frank L. Pack, secretary.
UNIIERSITY WOMEN'S
D.HEATH NOT IMPAIRED
DR. M. A. WALKER SAYS EARLY
CLASSES ARE NOT IN-
JURIOUS
"The health of the University girls
has not been impaired by the 7:30
classes, so far as I have been able to
note," said Dr. M. A. Walker of the
woman's department of the Universi-
ty health service, yesterday afternoon
when questioned concerning the re-
port that the early classes were prov-
ing harmful to the girls of the Uni-
versity.
"Of course, one-half hour less sleep
could not help but be detrimental to a
girl's health, if she did not compen-
sate at the other end of the day.
However, most of them have sufficient
reserve vitality to carry them over
until the adjustment to the new hour
of starting the day's work is made."
Dr. Warren E. Forsythe, head of the
University health service, said that
he had had little opportunity to ob-
serve the individual health of the
girls, but stated that if the girls re-
tired and rose according to the old
schedule of starting the day, and
went without breakfast, they would
certainly suffer in the way of ill
bealth.
Opinion of the two dormitories dif-
fers entirely in regard to the facility
with which University girls have ad-
justed themselves to the early classes.
Miss Grace M. Greenwood, social di-
rector of the Martha Cook dormitory,
said, "The girls have by no means
adjusted themselves. They don't go
to bed any earlier than last year and
they don't get up any earlier, which
necessitates getting a very hurried
breakfast. It is simply a matter of
will power and it will be months before
they do change their bed-time. Of
course they are perfectly willing to
co-operate with the men and have the
early classes, so that there will be
more time for themen to take mili-
tary training. The girls feel that they
(Continued on Page Six)

OPINIONS VARY ON
I DISPENSING ,WITH
USUAL JUNIOR HOuP
FRATERNITIES, SORORITIES, AND
FACULTY MEMBERS CAN-
VASSED
INFORMAL OR NONE AT
ALL--GENERAL OPINION

Seven Fraternities, Five
and Two Professors
Abandonment

Sororities
for

Seven fraternities out of the 37 can-
vassed have definitely stated that they
are in favor of dispensing with the
Junior hop this year, While eight are
of the opinion that the formal nature
of the function should be retained,
though three believe that an informal
affair would be more appropriate at
this time. The rest are non-committal
or else believe in reducing the ex-
penses materially, making no state-
ments regarding the formality of the
hop.
Sororities were reached with the re-
sult that five were decidedly opposed
to holding the annual affair, two in
favor of retaining the formality, and
three believing it better to have it
informal.
The faculty members reached were
of the opinion that the hop should be
temporarily dismissed or else reduced
o a simple function kept as near norm-
al as possible.
Those fraternities favoring a dis-
missal of the hop this year because it
is not in keeping , with the present
times are Delta Chi, Phi Delta Pi, Phi
Chi Delta, Phi Sigma Kappa, Phi Rho
Sigma, Theta Delta Chi and the Psi
Upsilon. The sororities of the same
opinion are Collegiate Sorosis, Kappa
Alpha Theta, Alpha Phi, Delta Delta
Delta and Chi Omega.
Eight Houses for Decreased Expense
Eight fraternities have voiced their
opinions that they believe the expenses
of the hop should be reduced as much
as possible, but that it should be form-
al. The real expense they claim lies
in the decorations, flowers and taxis.
The advocates of this policy are Alpha
Rho Chi, Alpha Sigma, Alpha Tau
Omega, Delta Tau Delta, Delta Theta
Phi, Delta Upsilon, Kappa Sigma,
Lambda Chi Alpha.
Acacia, Alpha Delta Phi, and Alpha
Kappa Kappa, all believe that an in-
formal hop would be better this year.
A number of fraternities are of the
opinion that the expenses of the hop
should be reduced materially and made
a simple affair, though they make no
remarks relative to the formality of
the function. In this class are in-
cluded Beta Theta Pi, Kappa Beta Psi,
Nu Sigma Nu,Sigma Phi Epsilon, Phi
Sigma Kappa, Sigma Delta Kappa, Sig-
ma Nu, Phi Beta Pi, Sinfonia, and Zeta
Psi. Many of the fraternities were not
reached or else were non-committal on
the subject.
Dean Cooley Wants Inexpensive Hop
Dean Mortimer E. Cooley stated em-
phatically that it was high time the
students realized the nation was at
war. "I am in favor of seeing the hop
held," he said, "but it should be cut
down to an old fashioned dance- a
dance that would be of no expense to
the students."
Prof. R. M. Wenley is of the opinion
that the Junior hop should be dispens-
(Continued on Page Six)

WILL THE BOOT TURN?

OFFICERS ELECTED BY SUETCUCL E
COMMITTEE APPOINTED TO AR.
RANGE FOR CORNELL GAME
PEP MEETING
Three officers for positions which
have been vacant since school has
started were elected and a Cornell-
Michigan mass meeting was appoint-
ted at the meeting of the Student,
council last evening at the Union.
E. C. Baumgarten, '18M, was elect-
ed vice-president of the council by a
vote of five to four. E. S. Schacht,
'18D, for recording secretary.
0. E. Madison, post graduate, T. W.
Thomas, '18L, and R. D. Smith, '19E,
were appointed to arrange for the pep
meeting with power to make such ar-
rangements for the date of this affair
as they might find necessary, This
clause was put in because of the Pre-
festival concert scheduled for Friday
evening before the game. The date
will probably be set for Thursday ev-
ening, Nov. 8.
Men were also appointed to take
charge of the engineering class elec-
tions, all of which will be held in the
second floor corridor of the Engineer-
ing building, near the Engineering so-
ciety rooms, from 7:15 o'clock this
morning to 3:45 this afternoon.
C. A. Hart, '18E, a member of the
committee to investigate substitutes
for the flag rush and push ball con-
test, reported that letters had been
sent to 24 universities inquiring into
the nature of the interclass games
held at these schools, if any such were
held, but no answers had been re-
ceived as yet.
The meeting adjourned without tak-
ing up any further business.
VON HERTLING. APPOINTED NEW
GERMAN CHANCELLOR BY KAISER
Amsterdam, Nov. 1.- According to
dispatches received here from Berlin,
the Vologne Gazette says Emperor
William received Count von Hertling
this afternoon and that von Hertling
accepted the imperial chancellorship
and the office of premier of Prussia.
Dr. Karl Helfferich, secretary of the
interior and vice-chancellor, and Herr
von Waldow, president of the German
food regulation board have resigned.

FIRST AMERICNS TO
TRENCHES OUT; MORE IN
ENEMY UNAWARE OF RELIEF; IN.
FLICT FEW CASUAL-
ITIES
(By Associated Press)
With the American Army in France,
Nov. 1.-The first battalions of Amer-
icans in the trenches have been re-
lieved by their comrades.
Relief which is considered one of the
critical periods in that the enemy, by
shelling the approaches to the position,
may inflict heavy damage, was accom-
plished successfully. Apparently the
enemy was not aware of what was go-
ing on.
With the men back in the billets,
it now is permitted to mention for the
first time that the casualities were
negligible. In fact, more men are suf-
fering with "trench feet" than with
wounds.
From a military standpoint, the ex-
perience gained by the Americans is
considered of a very high value of the
training of contingents which are yet
to arrive on French soil. It was a tir-
ed, dirty, wet, mud-caked body of -men
that returned to billets. The men had
only two clear days while in the
trenches. They were covered with
mud from hats to their shoes. Before
anything else they required a bath first
with gasoline and then with water.
Today the sun was shining bright-
ly and the returned soldiers spent most
Qf the time sunning themselves and
their belongings. Tonight the return-
ed battalions are clean and ready to
go back again.
LOW WATER LEVEL CAUSE OF
PECULIAR TASTE IN WATER
Dr. J. A. Wessinger, health officer,
has written a communication to the
Ann Arbor Times News explaining the
present "leaf mould" taste of the city's
water supply. Due to the fact that the
water demand is almost as great as
the complete supply gained from the
Huron river, he says, the water level
of the river has greatly fallen and
much vegetable matter is being col-
lected along with the water, giving it
this peculiar flavor. Chemists have
assured him that the water is safe

STUDENT DRIVE FO
FRIENDSHIP: FUND1
OPENS SATURDA')
COMMITTEE FORMED TO CONDUCT
CAMPAIGN UPON UNIVER-
SITY CAMPUS
MICHIGAN'S QUOTA
AMOUNTS TO $25,00
Professor C. T. Johnston Appointe
Chairman of Campaign Cod=
mittee
The University's quota in the Stu
dents' $1,000,000 Friendship war fun
campaign which opens Saturday i
$25,000.
Michigan colleges pledged $50,000
the $1,000,000 allotted to the facultie
and students of the college of the Unit
ed States at Camp Custer, Oct. 19, fo:
work in the camps both here and
abroad. Forty-five representatives o
the University were present at thi
collegiate conference.
The one million dollars to be raise
among the colleges is part of the na
tional movement to obtain $35,000,00
for the Y. M. C. A. In camps, both hom
and in Europe.
Committee Chosen
Following the meeting at Battli
Creek, President H. B. Hutchins is
sued a call for the representative
from all the campus organiations t
meet to discuss plans for Michigan'
part in the campaign. Professor C. 'f
Johnston of the engineering college
was appointed chairman of the driv
committee at the all-organizatioi
meeting held last Sunday, and appoint
ed in turn, the following committe<
to manage the effort in the Universty
Professores L. A. Strauss, E.. C. God
dard, L. M. Gram, Dean Myra B.Tor
dan, Steven Attwood, '18E, George
Hurley, '18L, Robert McDonald, '1
Merle Doty, '18E, Helen Bourke, '1
Anna Lloyd, '18, Harry Carey, '19, Prol
G. W. Dowrie, N. C. Fetter, secretar:
of the University Y. M. C. A., Frauci
Bacon, '02, social secretary of the Un
ion. The officers are: Professor
Johnston, executive chairman; Prc
fessor Dowrie, treasurer, and Ni C
Fetter, secretary.
Should Beat Cornell and Pensy
"I feel confident that Michigan ca:
outdistance Cornell and Pennsylvani
who have finished raising their quota
The committee has found that all wb
have been approached to help th
cause of recreation and comforts ft
the Sammies in the trenches, in th
cantonments, and the soldiers in th
prison camps of Germany, have read
ily agreed to do what they could," d
Glared Mr. Fetter.
"There are so many Michigan men I
uniform, that the Michigan stude
will be eager, I am sure, to help mak
fighting conditions better for them,
asserted Professor Johnston, chairma
of the drive, "and I am certain that w
will do the campaign up in royal Mi
igan style."
Dean Myra B. Jordan and Miss Le
inert of the Y. W. C. A., will ha
charge of canvassing among womei
(Continued on Page Six)
MOVIE MEN AID GOVERNMENT
IN PROCURING STENOGRAPHER
Motion picture men in the Unite
States numbering 20,000 expresse
their patriotism recently. Throng
the medium of their shows, the go
ernment was able to spread the at

nouncement, free of charge, that type
writer operators and stenographer
of both sexes are badly needed ft
war work in Washington.
Not more than 100 of the total nun
ber declined to render the service r
quested and even these cannot b
charged with disloyalty as most o
them held decided views as to the
duty to their . patrons who pay fo
entertainment only.

Frederick von Payer, progressive mem- for drinking purposes although boiling
ber of the reichstag, says the dispatch, and filtration can help but little in
is to be appointed vice-chancellor. improving its taste.

1

Name, address, phone
number, department,
class, home city, of each
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and Ypsilanti.
.List of Telephone
numbers by streets.

Students'

Directory
TODAY 80c

Personnel of sororities
dormitories, and frater-
nities.
Officers of organiza-
tions and classes.
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faculties.
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