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November 01, 1917 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-11-01

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FHE WEATH
SLOWLY RISIYI
TEM[PERATURE

[ER
o~t rtkiaIz

4:3att

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIR
SERVICE

XXVIII. No. 27.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 1917.

PRICE THREE C

. .

KUTONS OVERRUN'
HOUSAND SQURE
MILES Of ITALY

NERAL CARDORNA STILLI
ENS RETREAT PURSUED
ENEM~Y

HAST-
BY

ALLIES RUSH AID
TO BOLSTER LATINS
Americans Waive All Export Restric-
tions Regardless of Short-
ags
(By Associated Press)
London, Oct. 31.-. Virtually 1,000
square miles of Italian territory has
been overrun, more than 120,000 Ital-
ians have been made prisoners and in
excess of 1,000 guns have been captur-
ed by the German and Austro-Hungar-]
Ian armies in their eight days' drive
from the Isonzo and Carnic Alps fronts
of the Austro-Italian theater of war.
From the east, the enemy invasion
on the center of the battle front now
is well within gun range of the Tag-
liamento river where it has been pre-
sumed General Cadorna would turn
and make a stand. The Italian com-
mander-in-chief, however, has not yet
brought his troops about to face the
enemy but is continuing his retreat
with the rear guards harassing the
advance.
Engagegent Successful
According to the latest Berlin offic-
ial communication announcing heavy
losses to the Italians in men and guns,
engagements successful for the enemy
have taken place on the Tagliamento
plain, while the communication from
Rome announces that there has been
fighting on the hills of St. Daniel
de Fruili along the Ledra Canal, at
points northwest of Udine and from
four to five miles east of the Taglia-
mento.
Meanwhile preparations to aid the
Italians in their hour of extremity are
being rushed . by the allies. Jules
Cambon, general secretary of the
French ministry of foreign affairs, has
expressed the conviction that the Ital-
ians will be able to stem the tide of
the invasion with the aid of French
and British troops sent to reinforce
them. The American government is to
waive all export restrictions in favor
of Italy, permitting that country to
take whatever materials she requires,
regardless of prospective shortages
here.
No Big Operations
On the other battle fronts no big
operations have taken place. Still an-
other mutiny among the Germans is
reported. This time it was among the
troops in Belgium who are declared
to have refused to go to the front and
even to have fired on their officers,
several of whom were wounded.
Italian headquarters in Northern
Italy, Oct. 30.-Everything has had to
yield for the moment to military nec-
essities, and this will explain the lack
of details which can now be given
briefly concerning one of the most
momentous phases of the war. The
supreme command has no desire to
keep the facts from the Amercian,
British, or foreign public but in such
a supreme moment its first considera-
tion is not to publish details which
can afford the enemy the slightest
clue either to what has occued o
what is in store.
Few itness Drama
One of the commanding officers in-
formed the correspondent that the pub-
lic should be placed on guard against
reports which doubtless will be spre',
from scattered information. The fact
is, those who have actually witnessed
the recent drama are extremely few,
outside of military authorities.
General Cadorna's bulletin struck
the keynote in saying: "The violence
(Continued on Page Six)

DRUIDS INITIATE
SEVEN AWENY DDS
Crooning their ancient chant, a
procession, white-robed and shrouded
with mystery passed across the cam-
pus in theadeepening shadows of the
twilight late yesterday afternoon to
the sacred rock about which were
grouped seven cold-benumbed senior
lits.
Gatherning them to their midst in
awful ceremony, the white-robed ones
continued on their weird way, arriv-
ing at last at the high altar of Druids,
where the "Awenydds" were shown
the mysteries of the order, learning
how to sharpen the glittering sickles
and cut the' sacred ivy.
Prof. Arthur G. Cross, Prof. Morris
P. Tilley, honorary Druids, responded
to toasts at the initiation banquet
held at the Catalpa Inn following the
initiation.
The new Druids are Arthur Ippel,
Herbert Wilson, Philip Pack, Harry
Welford, Fred A. Gariepy, Gerald Ga-
briel, and John E. Campbell.
LAUNCH OVERSES Y.M.C.A.
CAMPAIGN FRIDAY NON

BIG PIER BURNS;
$4,000,000 LOSS

Believe Blaze Was of
Origin; Flames Leap
Five Points

WORKERS SET $20,000
ENTIRE DISTRICT'
CANVASSED

Incendiary
From

AS GOAL;
TO RE

In an effort to raise $20,000 for the
oyerseas Y. M C. A. allotment, the
committee in charge will launch its
campaign with a banquet to be held on
Friday noon at the city Y. M. C. A.
But one week, that of Nov. 11, will
be given over to this intensive cam-
paign.
It is the intention of the temporary
committee men to organize the county
so that the entire district may be
thoroughly canvassed. Ann Arbor's
per capita and total quotas will ,also
be estimated at this time, with a sep-
arate quota for the University.
A. L. Parker, general secretary of
Y. M. C. A. workers at Camp Custer,
and the -Rev. Lloyd A. Douglas, recent
chairman of the publicity committee
of the war work council, will be
among the list of speakers, and will
give specific examples of the commend-
able work of the Y. M. C. A. army
huts.
Co-operating committees from Ypsi-
lanti, Milan, Chelsea, Saline, Man-
chester, Dexter, Salem and Whitmore
Lake and a number of local business
men will be in attendance. Roscoe
Bonisteel, attorney-at-law, is chair-
man of the city general committee.
Broadway Bridge Near Completion
Broadway bridge, the new reinforced
concrete-work which crosses the Hur-
on river north of the Michigan Central
depot and connects the fifth ward
with the rest of the city is already
two-thirds completed. It occupies a
place formerly held by an old steel
bridge and is being built at a cost to
the city of $50,000.
Many Sign Food Pledge Cards
Washington,; Oct. 31.-Incomplete
returns show that approximately three
million families had been enrolled at
the close of the third day of Food
Pledge week. This total largely rep-
resents the efforts of workers in the
centers of population in 34 states, no
reports having been' received from
smaller towns and county districts.

ANTI-SUB SHELLS EXPLODE
AND SINK BRITISH STEAMER
Two Men Still Unaccounted for
Arrest Two of Men Sus-
pected
Baltimore, Md., Oct. 31.-A disas-
trous fire which wrecked two of the.
finest of the Baltimore & Ohio railroad
terminal piers at Locust Point and
spread to a British steamship that had
just docked at one of the piers for
loading broke out last night, causing
a financial loss estimated at between
$3,000,000 and $4,000,000.
Vice-President J. M. Davis, of the
Baltimore & Ohio railroad, said it
was the belief of the railroad officials
that the blaze was of incendiary or-
igin, as credible witnesses stated that
they saw flames leap from piers 8 and
9 at five points almost simultaneously.
The total loss will be over $3,500,-
000. , Of this which is said to be a
conservative estimate, the piers rep-
resented a value of $1,500,000, the
goods stored in them, $1,500,000, and
the steamer and cargo, $500,000.
The steamer, which docked yester-
day afternoon had on board 80 anti-
submarine shells, from a British port
These exploded with loud reports
when the ship took fire and it was
not long after the ship had beien
towed into mid-stream that she sank.
Chief of Police Leigh of the Balti-
more & Ohio began an investigation
immediately of the report of the pier
watchman that he saw five or six men
jump from pier nine just as the
flames broke out. The piers have
been under armed guards for a num-
ber of months.
Several months ago, a quantity of
dynamite was found in a loaded grain
car in one .of the elevators of the
railroad at Locust Point. The grain
was intended for onE of the allies.
The car was traced to its loading
point in the central west and found
to have been loaded by Austrian
stevedores.
Two men suspected of having a hand
in the fire have been arrested and
grilled in the office of the department
of justice. Their identiltes were not
given out. One of them is a saloon
keeper in the section in which the
fire occured. It was alleged that two
stevedores heard him say, "we are go-
ing to get the elevators next."
All men reported missing have been
.accounted for except a tally clerk on
the piers and a naval gunner on the
steamer.
Subscription Books For Indebtedness
Washington, Oct. 31.-Subscription
books for the latest issue of treasury
certificates of indebtedness of indefin-
ite amount have been closed, the
Treasury announced tonight, with to-
tal subscriptions received in five days
since the issue was opened amount-
ing to $684,631,000. Of the total,
$254,657,254 was reported during the
last day.
Today's subscriptions brought the
total of certificates of indebtedness to
be retired from proceeds of the sec-
ond Liberty Loan up to $2,319,056,000.

TELE6APHY SCHOOL FOR
ARMY MEN TO OPEN SOON
WESTERN UNION WILL COMBINE
WITH UNITED STATES IN
NEW SERVICE
According to the manager of the
local branch of the Western Union
Telegraph company, a new training
school to fit men for service in the
army and navy will be opened under
the combined auspices of the telegraph'
company and the government. The
course, which is to be of about eight
months' duration, will include the
teaching of the science of telegraph,
the science of electricity as applied to
telegraphic work, military telegraphy,
and in addition, the complete working
system of the Western Union concern.
After completing the course, those
who successfully pass the examina-
tions, will be recommended for war-
rants as non-commissioned officers in
the signal officers' reserve corps, and
university men will stand more than a
equal chance of being recommended
for commissions. Those who become
proficient may also qualify as wireless
operators, with about two weeks' ad-
ditional training, and thus see ser-
vice on a battleship.
The first class will be limited to
about 35 students, as this is the larg-
est number that can be accommodated
with the apparatus furnished the class
by the government. Up to the present
time, there have been 21 applicants
and as the course will commence Nov.
10, it is imperative for those who wish
to enroll to do so immediately. A
tuition fee of $5 per month will be re-
quired to pay for four two-hour night
classes per week. Further inform-
ation may be secured from the local
manager of the Western Union.
Calif. Professor Discovers Minerals
Berkeley, Cal., Oct. 31.-Two miner-
als not heretofore known to science
have been discovered at Crestmore,
Cal., according to a bulletin issued by
Prof. Arthur Eakle, department of
geology, University of California.
Replacing Windows Cologne Cathedral
Amsterdam, Oct. 31.-Stained glass
windows of the Cologne cathedral,
according to German newspapers, are
being replaced .with plain glass as a
precaution in case of air raids.

FOURTEEN JUNIORS
MAKE TAU BETA PI
Schuffling the scorching sands of the
river Nile while snow flew overhead,
14 lits were skidded into the silence
of Sphinx, junior lit honorary society,
yesterday afternoon.
Fall initiation mummified the fol-
lowing Sphinxes: Russell B. Doodge,
Gerald F. Nye, Joseph A. Hanish, Ver-
non H. Sparks, Richey B. Reavill,
John H. Emery, J. Ellsworth Robin-
son, James I. McClintock, Clarence
L. Roeser, Richard P. Hummer, Thom-
as R. Maynard, Joseph H. Broderick,
Ralph E. Gault, and Alexander C.
Crockett.
Oasis rations were served to the
members at the Michigan Union in the
evening. Robert T. McDonald, '18, act-
ed as the sheik's bell-boy and called
for speeches from Francis N. Bacon,

'02, Harry M. Carey, '19, and
B. Dodge, '19.

RussellI

SAMMIES DESIRE TO DO
PATROL WORK AT ONCE
(By Associated Press)
With the American army in
France, Oct. 31.-Conditions in
the sector in which the Americ-
ans are stationed were normal
today. The artillery work con-
tinued. The weather was cold-
er.
For the last two days there
has been considerbale aerial
observation, and late yesterday
three German planes flew over
the American trenches.
So great is the enthusiasm
among the Americans to go on
patrol that the French com-
mander has ordered that none
of the higher grade officers per-
form other than their regular
duties. It is the duty of the jun-
ior command officers and the
non-commissioned officers to go
with the patrols but the officers
of higher rank, such as majors,
were anxious to go out.
The quartermaster has sup-
plies for several days within
reach of the American position
as a precaution against any
transportation difficulties.
SPHINX MUMMIFIES
JUNIOR INITIATES
Tau Beta Pi, junior honorary soci-
ety in the engineering college, held
its fall initiation and banquet 'last
night at the Michigan Union.
Speakers for the occasion 'were
Prof. H. C. Anderson, who spoke
"for the faculty," Prof. J. C. Parker,
who talked "to the initiates," W. S.
Dinwiddie, '18, who gave "A Wel-
come," and L. W. Thoms, '18E, who
responded "For the initiates." S. S.
Atwood, '18E, acted as toastmaster.
The initiates were: M. P. Adams, C.
R. Avery. K. Bintz, W. C. Brockway,
G. A. Clark, H. W. Collins, H. T. Cor-
son, E. G. Fahlman, C. W. Good, E. M.
Schaffter, P. C. Stephen, L. W. Thoms,
and D, C. West.
Arizona Copper Miners' Strike Settled
Clifton, Ariz., Oct. 31-Final settle-
ment of the strike .of copper miners
in the Clifton-Morenci-Metcalf dis-
trict which has been in progress since
July 1 was announced tonight by Sec-
retary of Labor Wilson, chairman of
the federal industrial commission in-
vestigating labor conditions in the Ar-
izona copper camps. Approximately
'7,000 men were, effected.
Italians Lose Two Steamships
Rome, Oct. 31.-The loss of Italian
shipping on all seas by submarines
for the week ending Sunday last, were
two steamers of more than 1,500 tons
and one .steamer under that tonnage.
One small sailing vessel was sunk.
One steamer was attacked but escap-
ed.

That Michigan will play Chicago in
a post-season game seems most prob-
able, following recent communication
between P. G. Bartelme, director of
outdoor athletics, and the Michigan
alumni association in Chicago.
It is stated that the Chicago board
in control of athletics has voted to
allow Chicago to play a game at the
close of the regular season.. Mr.
Bartelme wired Chicago that he was
in favor of such a contest and that
he believed the Michigan board in con-
trol of athletics would favor it also.
The only thing left in the way of the
proposed tilt is the ratification of the
Michigan board and the Conference
board.
Have FavorMble Attitude
The favorable attitude of the Chica-
go athletic advisors toward the game
is doubtless a reflection of the setti-
ment of the other Conference teams.
And since the game is to be played for
war charity, thereseems to be nothin
in the way of the contest.
The place for playing has not yet
been decided upon and Mr. Bartelme,
in his telegram to Chicago, declared
that either Chicago or Ann Arbor
would be satisfactory to him. Ferry
field seems the most likely place for
staging the game since, several thous-
and more people can be occommodated
in the Ann Arbor stands than at Stagg
field.
No game has been played between
Michigan and Chicago since 1905.
when the Windy City team defeated the
Wolverines, by a 2-0 score, in a game
that has always been considered one
of the fiercest ever staged. There has
always been natural rivalry between
the teams and a game played at the
end of the season, when Conference
honors for the year might be decided,
would bring out the best football in
both aggregations.
Rank Even
Michigan's football team and that
of Chicago at the present time rank
about even according to the dope. The
Wolverines possess few veterans and
have built up a powerful team from
many new men. Stagg, at Chicago, has
accomplished the same thing, and his
recent victory over Northwestern
shows the strength of his eleven.
One of the primary arguments for
Michigan's return to the Conference
was that the natural rivalry of the
Ann Arbor school lay in the West, and
especially in playing Chicago and Min-
nesota.
Alumni Favor
The alumni of both institutions have
been behind the movement, and it was
the agitation of the Michigan alumni
in Chicago which resulted in Mich
igan being selected for Chicago's op-
ponent in the post-season tilt.
Further action on the game is await-
ing the decision of the Michigan and
Confercnee boards in control og ath-
letics.
Garfield Gets Information On Coal
Johnstown, Pa., Oct. 31.-Data show-
ing the cost of mining coal in the bitu-
minous thin vein field of Pennsyl-
vania to be at least $2.25 a ton and
under extreme conditions as much as
$3 a ton was represented to Fuel Ad-
ministrator Garfield by 140 operators
of the field.

WINDY CITY BOARD IN
VOTES CHI FAVOR
GAME

OF

WOLVERINE BOARD
PROBABLY GIVE AS

SLATE, MICHIGAN FOR POST-SEA'SON
FOOTBALL CONTEST WITH CHICAGOI
PLACE AND0 DATE STILL UNSETTLI

Plan for Struggle Still
Ferry Field May Be
of Tilt

Uncer1
Scene

ti

Name, address, phone
number, department,
class, home city, of each
student in Ann Arbor
and Ypsilanti'
List of Telephonwe
numbers by streets,

Students'
Directory
FRIDAY. 50c

Personnel of sororities
dormitories, and frater-
nities,
Officers of organiza-
tions and classes.
Full information as to
faculties.
288 pages, cloth bound.

Price $3.00
if you sub-
scribe.

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1918

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