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October 31, 1917 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-10-31

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THE WEATHER
PARTLY CLOUDY
SNOW FLURRIES

rA£r A

&titP

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERlVICE

VOL. XXVIII. No. 26.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1917.

PRICE THREE CE)

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... .

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H1G DRIVES BACK
TEUONIC ARMIES
IN YPRES SECTOR
ATTACKS GAIN GREATER PORTION
OF OBJECTIVES ON FLAND-
ERS FRONT
GERMAN REPORTS
ADMIT VICTORIES
Thrust of Hun Forces on Italian Front
Still Continued Un-
abated
-London, Oct. 30-Field Marshal Haig
again has sent forward his forces in
Ypres sector on what were apparently
intended as line straightening opera-
tions, and again has been successful
in gaining the greater portion of his
objectives. His attacks were delivered
over small fronts in the regions of
Paschendaele and Poel Capelle, where
spurs of ridges and others points of
vantage were taken.
The German official communication
admits that Paschendaele was cap-
tured but asserts that later it was re-
taken.
The drive of the Germans and Aus-
tro-Hungarian armies begun a week
ago against the eastern and north-
eastern fronts- of the Austro-Italan
theater, continues unabated. The
Italian cavalry are, however, fighting
to cover the retreat of.,army to posi-
tions chosen for a stand, and the Teu-
tonic allies are being impeded by the
flooded condition of the Pagliamento
river.
Udine, former headquarters of the
Italian army in eastgern Venetia, has
been captured by the invaders, who
also are pressing the Italians west-
ward from the Isonzo front, and in-
vading their territory from the north,
through passes in the Carnic Alps.
The invasion of the province of Ven-
etia from the east with Udine the
apex of the drive, already is about 20
miles, but as yet no definite informa-
tion is at hand from which it is possi-
ble to judge the extent of the advance
of the Teutons in the other. districts.
Nothing has been vouchsafed either
in the Italian, German or Austrian of-
ficial communications what the situa-
tion is in the Trentino sector,
which lies to the west and north-
west of the present zone of activity
but it is not improbable that if, as un-
official advices have stated, the Aus-
tro-Swiss frontier has been closed, re-
inforcements both from Germany and
Austria are being hurried up for an
offensive of great magnitude in this
region.
After the retreat of the Italians, the
British artillery units, which early in
the spring wvere sent to the Isonzo
front to aid the Italians in their drive
to Triest, saved all of their guns, but
'the men suffered severely from cold
and lack of food.
CAMP CUSTER COMPLETE IN
TEN DAYS, SAY AUTHORITIES
Camp Custer, Oct. 30.-If the weath-
er will remain clear for another ten
days Camp Custer will be complete in
every detail and ready to be turned
over to the military authorities, ac-
cording to Major Earl Morden, in
charge 1 of construction work. The
camp is now ready for the next im-
crement of men.
It is believed that the call for theI

final 55 per cent of selected men will
be made effective about Nov. 9, and it
is probable that instead of absorbing
40 per cent first and the additional
15 per cent later, the entire lot will
be combined in one movement.
* Major Bussche, divisional athletic
officer, has challenged the football
team at Camp Devans, Ayer, Mass., for
a football game either in Boston or
New York to be held shortly after

TRIANGLES CHOOSE
TEN NEW MEMBERS
Dinner At the Union To Follow
Annual Initiation; Prof. Stevens
To Speak
Ten junior engineers will be init-
iated into the Triangles this after-
noon.
The proselytes are: D. M. Springer,
T. R. Jeffs, T. C. Garrett,R. L. Storr-
er, H. J. Mack, C. P. Beath, W. C.
Babbitt, C. B. Campbell, J. A. Gross,
and R. S. Cooper.
After the Initiation, there will be a
dinner at the Union, at which Prof.
F. H. Stevens will speak.
Open Germanic
Patents to U. S
Washington, D. C., Oct. 30.-The
vast store of German scientific infor-
mation in this country was opened to-
day to American manufacturers in
regulations issued by the federal
commission under which enemy own-
patents and copyrights will be licens-
ed for manufacture by citizens of the
United States.
When the regulation had been
made public, the commission met a
group of medical men to consider i-
censing the manufacture of certain
drugs, principally salvarsan, used in
virulent blood diseases and non-toxic
substitutes for local anaesthetics of
which the supply in this country has
run dangerously low since the war.
Approximately 20,000 patented and
copyrighted articles are said to be ef-
fected by the commission's order.
Among them are dye stuff formulaes
of vital importance to American in-
dustries.
ANN ARBOR MAY BE HIT
BY TELEPHONE RAISE
The Michigan State Telephone com-
pany has petitioned the interstate
commerce commission for a raise in
telephone rates which will especially
hit small towns throughout the state.
If the petition is granted, Ann Arbor
is to be among the cities that will
suffer.
War Costs U. S. $30,000 Every Minute
The United States government is
spending $30,000 every minute, night
and day, for this month, and at pres-
ent the treasury balance is $547,071,-
940. So much for the cost of the war.
The Allies are borrowing half of the
total, but even at that the idea of the
two billion dollar month, which of-
ficials promise is not far off, quite
takes the breath away.
Prospects Good for Seal Sale
Michigan's quota of 400,000,000 Red
Cross Christmas seals will be easily
disposed of, according to Mr. W. L.
Cosper; who is in charge of the sale
for Michigan.
Mr. Cosper visited a number of cities
in the state last week and reports
that Bay City, Port Huron, Mount
Clemens, and other cities manifested
great interest in the campaign.
Cook County Women Permitted Vote/
Women in Cook county, Ill., and
Chicago have been given the right to
vote on the bond proposition isue at
the judicial election on Nov. 6. They

POSTOFFIGI READY
TO INCREASEDATES
OLD CARDS AND ENVELOPES
WILL BE USED UNTIL SUP-
PLY RUNS OUT
The Ann Arbor postofflce is well
prepared to meet the demand when the
new postage rates go into effect on
Nov. 2.
'Postmaster H. J. Abbott has announc-
ed that the local branch is well sup-
plied with three-cent stamps, -but
that the sale one-cent postal cards
and two-cent stamped envelopes would
be continued while the supply lasts,
the public being notified to affix a one-
cent stamp to the cards and envel-
opes. As soon as a supply of new
two-cent cards and three-cent envel-
opes can be manufactured they will be
placed on sale.
Beginning Dec. 1, revenue stamps
will have to be placed on all parcels
at the rate of one cent for every parcel
bearing 25 cents inpostage.
MICHIGANENSIAN
SALE SETS RECORD
Advance Subscriptions Show That
More Underclassmen Want Books
Than Formerly

OBTAIN 864,000 NAMES
FOR FOOD PLIOEDGED

"AWENYDDS" AWAIT
WEIRD PROCESSION
Druid Priests Will Come In Flowing
Robes To Conduct Flame
Rites of Britany

PRO-GERMAN PROPAGANDA HIN-
DERS WORK IN SOME
STATES
Washington, Oct. 30.-Despite the
handicap of bad weather, the food ad-
ministration had obtained tonight
more than 964,000 signatures to food
pledge cards in the first two days of
its intensive campaign Oroughout
the country. This total was contain-
ed in reports from about half of the
states.
The aim for the week is to enroll
the signatures of ten million families.
Yesterday and today added to those
previously obtained, making a grand
total of 2,605,000.
Pro-German propaganda, the food
administration announced tonight, is
hampering the work of volunteers in
somedstates, bousewives, it is de-
clared, have been told that if they
sign the cards, the government will
seize their house stores for the armies.
Lansing, Oct. 30.-Official reports
from 25 counties received at the of-
fice of the State Food Administration
here tonight showed that 32,270 signa-
tures to pledges for food conserva-
tion have been obtained by workers.
The figures include Wayne county
and Detroit, but none of the other
more populous counties. From De-
troit, reports came that approximate-
ly 17,000 pledges had been obtained
in two days' work.
The plans of the food conservation
campaign call for a total enrollment
in the state of 400,000 and in Detroit
of 186,000.
ANNUAL EDITORIAL
CONTEST TO BE HELD
Pi Delta Epsilon Offers Prize to Un-
derclassman Submitting Best
Manuscript

*

*I

Subscriptions for the 1918 Michi-
ganensian have been received by the
solicitors on the campus in numbers
which far exceed the totals of the
first drive of last year. More under-
classmen than ever have subscribed
for the book.
By contracting for a copy in the
fall, 50 cents will be saved, making
the total cost but $3.00, whereas those
failing to subscribe during the pres-
ent campaign must pay $3.50 for each
copy. The increased cost of printing
and paper will make this year's edi-
tion a limited one, and seniors who
fail to subscribe may find themselves
at a loss to obtain their books during
commencement time.
Subscriptions of 50 cents may be
paid any time during this week at the
tables in the Library, University hall,
and the Medical building.
COAL SITUATION
STILL UNKNOWN
Five Carloads .Will Temporarily
Relieve Shortage; Hope For
Additional Supply
Mayor E. M. Wurster declared yes-
terday that it would be impossible to
prophesy the fuel situation in Ann Ar-
bor at the present time.
The mayor has just returned from a
conference in Detroit, where the may-
ors of different Michigan cities met
with Fuel Administrator Prudden to
discuss the fuel shortage.
Five carloads of fuel are now on
their way from West Virginia and
Pennsylvania coal fields and will
reach the city within a few days.
This is but a small portion of the ag-
gregate amount this city will require,
/but it will help to relieve the present
shortage. The coal will be distrib-
uted through the police department
and deliveries will be made by the lo-
cal dealers.

As the shades of evening descend
upon the campus today, seven figures
will be descried shivering from cold
and apprehension, grouped about the
ancient Druid rock. And then when
the bell shall sound the appointed
hour, a procession wierd and solemn,
garbed in flowing robes of green and
white will wind along the campus
walks, crooning low their olden mel-
ody.
These are Druids, priests of ancient
Brittany, coming from-the oak groves
where they have pondered long over
the meanings of the sacred ivy and
mistletoe. As the tongues of flames
leap from the face of the Druid rock,
the eyes of the Awenydds shall be cov-
ered that they may not desecrate by
their glance the sacred altar.
About the campus they will walk to
the high altar where they will learn
the meanings of the mystei'ous prac-
tices of the Druids, senior literary so-
ciety.
sphinx Caravan
Gathers Today
Ringing bells stolen from the seven
fat and seven lean kine of Egypt, a
mystic caravan of the far East will
wind its way among the self-propell-
ed vehicles on Ann Arobr's streets to-
morrow.
Though the equinoxial rains deluge
the thoroughfares, 14 juniors will
tread the burning sands of the river
Nile.
Guided pains-makingly by those
who have thirsted with the camels,
the one-time jolly juniors will labor-
iously and timorously count the indi-
vidual stones of the everlasting pyra-
mids.
Sphinx initiates tomorrow. Only'
those who' are strong of heart endure
the desert trail.
Aloree! The silence, unbroken, con-'
tinues.'
B. and 0. Pier at Baltimore Burns
Baltimore, Oct. 30.-The large'
freight pier of the B. and O. R. R. in'
the heart of that company's large ter-
minal at Locust Point, and on the
west side of the harbor, .is burning.
The loss probably will be heavy.
MOONLIGHT AIDS "SAMMIES"
IN SNIPING ENEMY FORCES
With the American Army in France,
Oct. 29.-A full moon is shining to-
night over the sector occupied by the
American troops, flooding with its
light the entire surrounding country.
It makes conditions favorable for
snipers, but hinders the patrols
from working freely in "No Man's
Land."1

'u1l1 ,.1! I u uIWll
VON LUXBERG'S LETTERS THRO
NEW LIGHT ON GERMANIC
INTRIGUE
STATES BRAZILIANS
VENEERED INDIAN
Documents Anticipate Early Bre4
Between Argentina and Ger-
many
Washington, Oct. 20.-Two more
the notorious Count von Lexburg
messages to the German foreign ofit
from Buenos Aires were made pub
tonight by Secretary of State Lansin
They provide official confirmation
Germany's plan to control Southe
Brazil, and shed additional light u
on Teutonic intrigue in South AmerF
generally and reveal that Luxburg a:
pealed vainly for a squadron of su
marines with which to awe some La
in-Americans and to flatter' othe
with salutes.
Dispatches Given Out
These dispatches were given out
Secretary Lansing without discussk
of their contents. The messages fo
low:
"No. 63. July 7, 1917. Our attitu
towards Brazil has created the in
pression here that our easy goit
good nature can be counted on. Th
is dangerous is South America whe
the people are under a thin vene
Indians. A submarine squadron wil
full powers to me might probably sti
save the situation.
"(Signed.) LUXBURG."
"No. 89. Aug. 4, 1917. I am col
vinced that we shall be able to car
through our principal political am
in South America, the maintenane
of open market in Argentina and t1
reorganization of South Brazil equal)
well whether with or against Argei
tina. Please cultivate friendship wit
Chile. The announcement of a via
of a submarine squadron to salui
the president would even now exe
cise decisive influence on the situatic
in South America. LUXBUGo."
Reorganization Referred to
The "reorganization" of South Bra
zil referred to by von Luxburg is a
sumed here to refer to activities <
the Hamburg colonization company:
connection with- the large German eli
ment already located in that sectio
Sevet'al months before this dispate
was written, there were reports a
plans for a German insurrection
The break between Argentina an
Germany which von Luxburg .was al
parently expecting in July has not y
come and latest advices from Buenc
Aires do not indicate any intention o
the part of the Argentina governme
to join Brazil and other South Ame
ican nations on the side of the allies.
GOVERNMENT WILL EXCHANGE
FIRST LOAN BONDS FOR NEl
Washington, Oct. 30.-The treasur
department will soon issue a circula:
setting forth the manner in which Lit
erty loan bonds of the first issue ma
be converted into those .of the fse
ond.

Pi Delta Epsilon, upperclass honor-
ary journalism fraternity, will open
entries for its annual editorial con-
test tomorrow, and judging from the.
great amount of interest shown in
last year's contest, a large number of
contributions are expected.
As in the past, the contest will be
confined to members of the two lower
classes of the University who are not
connected with the reportorial staff
of any of the campus publications.
All submitted editorials are to be writ-
ten on some phase of college life, are
not to exceed 500 words in length, and
should be signed with a nom de plume
and addressed to the Pi Delta Epsilon
Contest Editor, care of The Daily. De-
tailed rules in regard to the contest
will be published in tomorrow's Daily
and will be read in the rhetoric class-
es during the week.
The prize of $10 offered for the win-
ning editorial will be awarded after
the Christmas holidays. Another sim-
ilar contest for upperclassmen wil be
begun by the fraternity in February,
and a prize of $25 will be offered as a
reward.
Siam Begins War In Earnest
Bangkok, Oct. 30.-The Siamese gov-
ernment has called for volunteers for
the force which it proposes to send to
the western front in France. The
commander will be trained in Bel-
gium.

Switchmen Demand Higher Wages
Chicago, Oct. 30.-Demands for a
50 per cent wage increase will be
submitted to the railroads of the.
United States by the members of the
Switchmen's Union of North America
as a result of action taken by a spe-
cial committee at a two days' meeting
which ended today. The Adamson
law, enacted in 1916 to avert a threat-
ened strike, reduces the total hours
of labor of the switchmen from ten to
eight hours, but did not increase their
wages.

have, however, been denied the right
to vote on the question whether the The cost of the war to date is es-
interest on the bonds will be raised timated at approximately $94,000,000,-
by taxes. 000.

IEngineers=- -.Notice! I

Senior and Junior Engineers get measured today for Corduroys at

Some adjustments in interest pay-
ments will have to be made, and the
treasury department is arranging a
scheme by means of which the ex-
change of bonds can take place with-
out an exchange of money. Plans have
been made, to allow people holding
bonds of the first issue to deposit
them with the banks until Nov. 15,
when they will immediately be ex-
changed for the four per cent bondE
of the second issue.
The United States army medical
corps now has a personnel exceeding
69,000 men as compared with 6,000
before the war.

Roy Henry's

304 State Street

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