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October 30, 1917 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-10-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


b

THEIR
THEY

BEST

in France, Oct.
.nd more huts to
e soldier's cry all

29. -
do it
along

His hut is up a straight, white'road,
shining silver under twin rows of
Lombardy poplars. To the rear sleeps
or seems to sleep, a tiny village, tiled
or thatched, and quiet. Nothing could
be more foreign, more un-American,
more French. Ahead, in a field, a few,
steps off the road, a black bulk rises;
a big building with a peaked roof. It
is amazedly full of men-at tables,
writing letters, reading magazines,
t playing checkers--Rembrandt men,
whose faces are lighted by the yelloi
flicker of candles planted on rails
along the walls-men i some sort of
e uniform-and at the far end a group
about an older man who sings with
n them.
It's "Way Down Upon the Suawnee
- River" they are singing, this bit of
the American army and this bit of the
American Y. M. C. A.-in France.

ARRGUES FOR CONTESTS
DECLARES THAT . ABOLISHING
THEM IS UNFAIR TO ALL CLASS-
ES AND ALUl NI

*

Men's Christian associ-
a vital need and more
huts already standing
M. C. A. worker in
m 16 to 20 hours daily
ing out the hut, carry-
pty ginger ale bottles
scrubbing the tables
rrange the day's pro
.ch he opens the can-
such a lunch as is pos.
inch hour arrives.
esiding at the countel
the athletic sports in
id he may have a class
tory, penmanship or
iduct meanwhiles. The
n with a hutful of mel
d keep busy and he
balance when the men

i

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** * .* *s.*.***

AT THE THEATERS

r
n_
s

1\

In a quiet room at the back, a Y. M.
C. A. worker is teaching French to a1
class of American soldiers. In a cor-1
ner, behind a counter, another work-
er is serving ginger-ale, crackers and
chocolate. A conspicuous sign an-
nounces a track meet and a baseball
game for tomorrow.
Some Turned Away
Other entertainers come to enliven
the evening and other soldiers come.
The hut was full. Now it overflows.
Some soldiers can neither force an
entrance nor find room to see between
the heads that fill the window. They
have to go away-and there's the pity.
for there's another night picture in
the vicinity of the American camps. It
is a Rembrandt picture too.
It is back there in the tiny, sleepy'
village. A curving street leads to a
hotel that is tightly shuttered and
closed against air and sound. Down
a badly smelling hall one stumbles,
upon a door that opens upon a narrow
room that is filled with a blare of
lamp-light and the mixed fumes of
oil and undigested drink, and from
dirt.
The room 'is full, not of regular pea-
sant customers long ago. gone to bed
but with boys-American boys-boys
for whom there was no room in the
hut. They sit at tables dragged from
all over the village to accommodate
the influx of unexpected custom. Here
and there among them is a girl. Not
the.' sort of girl the boys knew back.
home, but' the offscouring of little
towns thrown upon the highway and
creeping by night into the, only spot-
in France that would give them shelt-
er.

Editor, The Daily:
Where is this much talked of "pep"
of the student body of Michigan? One,
of the strongest gauges of the "pep".
of a student body is the way they
hold to the time honored customs of
their institution, provided those cus-
toms are worthy of being "stuck by."
One of the land marks so to speak,
in University' customs has recently
been done away with. It has been
ruled that there is to be no freshman-
sophomore flag rush, and there has
been no voice raised in remonstrance.
We are scarcely more concerned over
the abolishment of the event itself,
than with the utter lack of interest
shown by the student body and espe-
cially the classes concerned, in the
doing away with this time honored
custom.
The event has been prohibited, we
repeat, and now let us see on what
grounds, and under. what conditions.
Football as Dangerous
(1) It has been declared that there
were injuries sustained by the par-
ticipants and that the event was a
brutal one. We admit that there may
be some injuries, but there are not
nearly so many as in football. And
who would think of abolishing foot-
ball? Indeed, in proportion to the
number engaged, we venture to say
that there are not nearly so many
injuries. We also admit, nay, even
argue,. that the event is a strenuous
one. Therein lies its value. Would
the opponents of the custom have the
student body participate in games that
were merely gentle? We believe
sincerely that if we are to place our
young men in band. boxes, and care-
fully pack them in with cotton, the
sooner we throw up the national
sponge the better.
War No Reason
(2) It has been argued that because
of the present war conditions this cus-
tom should be stopped. Now will the
opponents of the custom pardon us if
we say that such a contention is ab-
solutely nonsensical. Wherein does,
it hinder our government in the prose-
cution of the war? It wastes neither
money nor any substance. Further-'
more, we believe that. it fosters a
spirit very much valued in those about
to take their part in military opera-
'tions. Surely it is known that in the
army everything possible is done to
foster boxing, wrestling, football and
all of the more strenuous athletic

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*

YOU CAN GO TO-
"Johnny Get Your Gun," at
Garrick, Detroit.

Whitney-"Peggy O'Moore."
Orpheum-Violet McMillan in
"The Girl Who Won Out." Also'
Weekly and Comedy. .
Wuerth-Taylor Holmes in "Ef-
ficiency Edgar's Courtship." Also
a Reel Comedy, "Day and Night."'
Majestic-Vaudeville.
Arcade- Mabel Taliaferro in
"Will-o'-the Wisp." Drew Come-'
dy, "His Ear For Music."
Rae-Dorothy Gish in "Her Of-
ficial Feathers." Triangle Comedy
"Birth Scandal."

TODAY

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* s s s*s s s*sas' s s* ta a

*
the *
*

Schedule for military students dril-E
ling under Lieut. George C. Mullen<
was announced yesterday afternoon.
The first day's drill program was pub-
lished Sunday morning ,
Second day drill: First battalion,
first regiment, athletic until 4:45
o'clock, company and squad; second
battalion, first regiment, company and
squad until 4:45 o'clock, athletic; thirdI
battalion, first regiment, manual of
arms; first battalion, second regiment,
close order squad; second battalion,
second regiment, close order company;
third battalion, second regiment, ex-
tended order, squad, and first battal-
ion, third regiment, company and
squad.
Third day drill: First battalion,
first regiment, close order squad; sec-
ond battalion, first regiment, manual
of arms; third battalion, first regi-
ment, athletic until 4:45 o'clock, com-
pany and squad; first battalion, second
regiment, company and squad until
4:45 o'clock, athletic'; second battalion,
second regiment, extended order
squad; third battalion, second regi-
ment, close order company, and first
battalion, third regiment, close order
squad.
Fourth day drill: First battalion,
first regiment, close, order. company;
second battalion, first regiment, ex-
tended order squad; third battalion,
first regiment, close order squad;
first battalion, second regiment, man-
ual of arms; second battalion, -second'
regiment, athletic until 4:45 o'clock,
company and squad; third battalion,
second regiment, company and squad
until 4:45 o'clock, athletic, and first
battalion, third regiment, close order
company.

Pop.Mat.Wd.
Best Seat $1
Sat. Mat. OARRIK
25c to X$1.50 UDETROITIP

AT THE GARRICK

LIKUT. 9, Co MULLEN
ISSUESDILL PRERA
STUDENTS TAKING MILITARY
WORK TO FOLLOW
SCHEDULE

fifteen weeks, announces C
ley, the Wool Controller.
an increase of 19,000,000 p
the amount purchased in
sponding period last year.

Wk. Oct.29
Nights
,50c to $2.00

JOHN CORT'S.LAUCHINC HIT
"JOHNNY GET YOUR GUIN
with LOUIS BENNISON and original N.Y.oa
Rae Theatre
TODAY-Dorothy Gish in "HER
OFFICIAL FATHERS." Good
Comedy.
.
HATTERS TO COLLEGE MEN
We make and retail hats. Make Hats-
Order and do all kinds of hat work such ;
rxeblocking. new bands. etc. We also sell ac
reb ock Army Hats.
hats shaped tofit the head free of char
when bought of us.
67FACTORY HAT STORE
617 Packard St.. next to the Delta.
Cor. State and Packard.
THE RIGHT PLACE TO BUY A HAT
Telephone 1792,
ARCADE
Tues-3o-Mabel Taliaferro in "Will-o'-
the-Wisp," and Drew Comedy, "His
Ear for Music."

"Johnny Get Your Gun," appearing
at the Garrick theatre, Detroit, this
week, is not a musical show but a
riotous farce, crammed full of genu-
inely hilarious situations and present-
ed by the same original company
which scored such a tremendous hit
in. New York City.
Louis Bennison, star of the piece,
appears in the role of Johnny Wiggins,
a stunt rider employed by a Los An-
geles moving picture concern. The
prologue is laid in the "movie" stu-
dio and satirizes in a humorous, good-
natured way the types so common in
filmdom. Then the action shifts to a
fashionable Long Island home where
Johnny goes to save the sister of his
old friend from the clutches of a for-
tune-seeking duke. Johnny, however,
succeeds in putting the Long Island
house in order, and then just to finish
off matters properly, wins for him-
self a charming young miss, serving
as a maid in the Long Island estab-
lishment.
Spicy News From
Other Universities

The "Sunbeam" motor developed
the British government for use
aeroplanes weighs 440 pounds, dev
ops 225 horsepower and is capable
driving a machine at the rate of
miles an hour.

Wed-3i-Yale Boss and Paul
;Knights of the Square Ta
der auspices of Boy Scout

i" I

U

I

hiffer & Marx

military
rcoat
n cool days this
my days.

nner

Taprooms Patronized
That is the inn-taproom as it is in
half a dozen villages about the Am-
erican camp, and no exercise of mil-
itary authority has yet prevented it
from so being. The officers are doingr
their best, but they say the Y. M. C. A.
must help. The French authorities
second their declaration._ Trained ob-
servers of social conditions s'ay that,
the efforts of the American officers
are admirable, but the one chance of
social salvation for the weaker and
more lonely American soldier in
France lies in the hands of the Y. M.
C. A.
Future France Ruined by Early-Peace
Paris, Oct. 29, -(Correspondence.)
-An inconclusive peace would mean
that Germany would, in 15 years, be
able to 'put Into the field, an army of
8,010,000 men against a total French
army of 3,332,000, according to figures
compiled by Andre Lefevre, deputy
from Aix and former minister of
finance.
M. Lefevre estimates the number of
survivors at tweny years of age in
the two countries, out of 100,000 male
births, at 72,950 for France and 70,-
605 for Germany. In spite of the
greater wastage in Germany, the re-
latively smaller birth rate in France
would reduce the latter's military
strength to only a little over 40 per
cent of that of her neighbor in 1933.

ich means it
hard wear
ive you the

will
and.
best

i :
t
E
l
r
k.
C.
r
r
l
f
r

variations for men
men.

aonliun

store at th soUth-
Main and Wash-
gets-downtown.

games.y
Substitutes Merely Ruse
(3) It was proposed by the Student
council to find a substitute for the
flag rush.With all due respect to those
who honestly wish to see the rush
abolished, we state that this seems to
be merely a ruse to prevent the out-
burst which would naturally be ex-
pected from such a proposal. For on
the face of it, as the last report of the
council suggests, what kind of a sub-
stitute can be found? Furthermore,
the suggestion that a substitute be
found is an admission of the neces-
sity of such a contest.
Facts Stretched
(4) It was argued with some degree
of reason that the participation of un-
trained students has harmful effects.
In being fair we must state that there
is a grain of truth in the contention.
But really weren't the facts stretched
a little? Were there so many very se-
rious injuries? Isn't it true most of
them consisted of black eyes, sore
muscles, and equivalent injuries?
Now a few cases of broken arms and
ribs can be named but not so very
many of them, we believe...
In conclusion then, it seems that
those who would abolish the flag rush
have not shown sufficient grounds for
so doing.
Concerns All Classes
This is a matter which concerns all.
the student body, alumni, seniors,
juniors, sophomores,-aye, even fresh-
men. No one thinks that the old class
rivalry should be abolished. It is an
honest and good-fellow-like, notwith-
standing, keen rivalry. This is what
is termed class spirit. Are we going
to let this class spirit die an ignomin-
ious death?
BRUCE S. MOULTON, '20E.
With the completion of new torpedo
boat destroyers in 1918 the United
States will have the largest fleet of
this class of vessels in the world.
A dispatch from Mexico announces
the discovery of paraffine in Chihua-
hua.
You can get those Neolin Soles put
on at Paul's Place, 611 E. William,
while you wait.-Adv.

Every girl at the University of Okla-
homa is writing to at least two sol-
dier boys. "I'm writing to five," said
one maid,, "four of them because they
asked me to write to them to help
pass their lonesome hours, and the
other-o, well, just because."
Olive drab uniforms for the whole
university, men and women, are advo-
cated by Dean Templin of the Univer-
sity of Kansas. "It would not only
create a distinctive atmosphere to see
all the students wearing military uni-
form,' said the dean, "but it would al-
so be a matter of real economy."
While registering at the Louisiana
State university, a man voluntarily
gives his word not to give or receive
help in the classroom, not to make
untruthful false statements, and to
give truthful answers to any official
questions.
Fraternity petition for the removal
of the rule obliging freshmen to room
in the freshman dormitories, was de-
nied by the faculty of De Pauw univer-
sity. Fraternities asked that the
freshmen be allowed to enter houses
during their first year because of fi-
nancial embarassment, due to the,
fact that many members had entered
service.
Sororities at the University of Kan-
sas have instituted sorority exchange
dinners. These extend throughout the
fall and winter until each sorority;
has entertained every other sorority.
The girls of Purdue University will
have a ukulele orchestra. Try-outs
were held last week and nine candi-
dates were accepted.
The fraternities at the University of
Indiana have joined in a war resolu-
tion, abolishing the use of flowers, fa-
vors, and taxicabs at all fraternity
events. ' Programs,. decorations, and
refreshments will be inexpensive; and
the use of more than five pieces in an
orchestra is prohibited.
Schedule of dinner date exchanges
has been mace out by fraternities
at Iowa State university.
Dancing at Armory every Saturday
night from 9 to 12. Admission 75c.-
Adv.

Hospital Notes
I. J. Mohlmen, '20M, was removed to
the University hospital Sunday after-
noon. No diagnosis has been made..
F. Kennedy, '21, who was taken to
the University hospital last. Friday
with a well developed case of pneu-
monia, is improving.
Helen Conger, '18, who has been at
the University hospital with a case of
typhoid fever, is convalescing.
Society Outlines Year's Policy
Plans for the conduct of the Me-
norah society were outlined by A. J.
Gornetzky, '17-'19L, president of the
organization, at its initial meeting
Sunday night at Newberry hall. Miss
Rebecca Greenberg, '19, read her pa-
per on "The Preservation of Jewish
Nationality in America," which won"
the $100 Menorah prize for 1917, and
Prof. Louis A. Strauss spoke on "The
Jew in the World War."
Local Lad Gets Medal Selling Bonds
The name of Scout John Bellard
of Ann Arbor has been added to the
list of those that are to receive war
medals for having sold ten Liberty
bonds. The Ann Arbor troops sold
$27,700 worth of the bonds.
Reports from national headquarters
show that the Boy Scouts succeeded
in raising $21,000,000 to the national
loan.
Official corduroy trousers for Junior
and Senior Engineers on sale at N. F.
Allen & Co., Main St. at $3.25 per
pair.-Adv.

Use the Daily classified

MAJESTI1C
EVE. 7:30-9. 200, 25o 30a
MAT. 3 P.M. 1lo, and $00
3 Days Corn. Mon.
PHIL E. ADAMS
AND HIS
"Facinatin Flirts"
with
Jack Walsh & Co. of Clever
and Pretty Girls
Lillian Morley and
McCarthy Sisters
The "Three" Misses
Weston
Delton, Mereena
and Delton
Lou Hoffman
3 Days Com. Thur.
MELODY SIX
-4- OTHER ACTS -4-
Special Children's
Matinee
Saturday, Nov. 3
Bring the Kiddies to meet' Karl
Emmy,' Pets
On and after Nov. 1st this Theatre is
required by la w to collect aUnited.
States Tax of io%/ on all admissions.

columns.--

ARNOLD AND COMPANY
JEWELERS
220 S. MAIN ST.

Adv.
WHITNEY
THEATRE
Happy Lou Whitney Co.
Sun., Mow., Tues., Weds
PEGGY 0' MOORE
Big Irish Play-Teeming
with patriotism
A Oldstinct Novelty - The Play of the Hour
Thur., Fri., Sat.,
WHY GIRLS HOME
LEAVE
The Play that started the nation-
wide Vice Crusade

Wuerth Theatre
BOOKINGS FOR OCTOBER
Prices: s Cents
Matinees 2, 3:30. Nights 6:30, 8, 9:30
Saturdays-Sundays-Continuous
Tues-Wed-3o-3t-Taylor Holmes in "Ffi-
ciepcy Udgar's Courtship." Also a.
Reel Comedy, "Day and Night."
NOVEMBER
Thur-Fri-z-2-Wallace Reid in "The Hos-
tage." Also Keystone Comedy.
Sat.-3-Florence LaBadie in "War and
the Woman." Also Serial, "Neglect-
ed Wife," No. 9.
OrpheumTheatre
BOOKINGS FOR OCTOBER
Prices: zoc unless otherwise specified
Matinees 2, 3:3o. Nights 6:30. 8, 4:30
Saturdays-Sundays-Continuous
Tues-3o-Violet McMillan in "The Girl
Who Won Out." Also Weekly and
Comedy.
Wed-31i-Montague Love in "The Brand
of Satin." Weekly and Comedy.

your Christmas Shopping Early is the slogan of the Consumers'
And the wise ones take their tip.
stock of Diamonds, Jewelry and Watches and Silverware is
e, now. You will have more time to think it over, more time to
out, and will get the choice now of the most complete stock in
isit to our store and a look around with a comparison of price
you where to buy at money saving prices.

MOTHERS-BRING FATHERS-BRING
YOUR DAUGHTERS YOUR SONS

ARNOLD AND COMPANY
JEWELERS
220 S. MAIN ST.

Prices: Eve.10-20-25c

,Thur-i -
forme
Ford

NOVEMBER
e Love in "A
Also Triangle C
:kly.

Pop. Mats.-WED.-SAT.

Iucb

REMEMBER
Lou ln ad

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