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October 30, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-10-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WEATHER
W OR RAIN
TODAY

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ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AMD NIGHT WIR
SERVICE

[TVTSTTT l\T ifr -

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. XXVIII. No. 25.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1917.

PRTCD, THREE Cl

zaviv, aniL11 ILV11YL\

GERMANS DRIVE
WEDGES IN ITALY1
ALLESSEND .AID
BRITISH AND FRENCH TROOPS
ARE PROBABLY ACROSS
FRONTIER NOW
CADORNA IS CHECKING
ADVANCE ONTO PLAINS
Internal Conditions Unified As Re-
sult of Teutonic Of-
fensive.

t - ., - _ -- .. _ - - -

7:30 CLASSES
STUDENTS'

RUIN
HEALTH

SOLDIERS' SMOKES
CAMPAIGN OPENS

Submarine Attacks Ship Carrying
Congressmen; Tars Are on the Job

(By Associated Press.)
In an endeavor to crush the forces
of General Cadorna, the Germans and
Austro-Hungarian troops are rapidly
entering three wedges on the Austro-
Italian front.
Meanwhile, in order to help the
Italians in their hour of trouble, Great
Britain and France are preparing to
lend aid, and the possibility is
that already troops are being hasten-
ed across the western Italian frontier,
and by the way of Turin and Milan, to
the battle front in the 'east.
Already the Teutons, according to
the German official communication,
are standing before the town of
Udine, the former grand head-
quarters of the Italian army, hav-
ing dirven. on past Cividale.
In the press westward from Gorizia,
the Germans have captured the town
of Cormons, ten miles to the south-
east of Udine, and the entire Italian
line, southward to the head of the
Adriatic is reported to be in retreat.
In addition to the wedges driven in-
to the Italian front on the east and
northeast, the Teutonic allies have
started a third wedge in the north
through the Ploecken Pass, their hope
evidently being to cut off the retreat
of the greater portion of General Cad-
orna's armies moving west and south-
west.
The Italian commander in chief,
however, reports that his men are
checking the advance in this region.
Evidently the weakness among the
Italians has been entirely overcome, as
Cadorna says that all movements or-
dered by the general staff now are be-
ing carried out in regular order and
that the Italians are fulfilling their
duty "by keeping in check the enemy's
advance onto the plains.'
As a result of the Teutonic allied
offensive, internal conditions in Italy
are declared to have been uni-
fied, the preponderating idea of the
entire population now being to abolish
party lines in order to meet the situ-
ation in the best interests of the coun-

Declares Women are Breaking Down
Because of Lack of Sleep
and Breakfast
Are the 7:30 o'clock classes the
cause of the many illnesses prevalent
among women of the University?
A prominent Ann Arbor physician
asserts that the unusually large num-
ber of University women being treat-
ed by him at the present time shows
the results of the 7:30 o'clock classes
to be anything but beneficial.
"This wholesale wave of economy
that is spreading all over the United
States is all right unless carried to
faddish extremes. The matter of sav-
ing half an hour's electric current and
starting classes earlier may result in
economy for the University to the ex-
tent of about $50 a year, but it has
anything but beneficial effect upon the
students.
"I am now treating a number of
University wofnen who are on the
verge of nervous break-downs because
of this. None of them go to bed any
earlier at night. They lose this much
sleep, have barely enough time to ket
a wholesome breakfast, and as a re-
sult are poorly nourished. After a
whole morning's routine of classes,
they are worn out. Contrary to the
popular notion, it takes just as mudl
calorific energy to study well as to dig
ditches well. It will take a long time
before the students get adjusted to
this new program, and in the mean-
time, more than one of them is go-
ing to have a fat doctor's bill. A half-
hour makes little difference later in
the day, but early in the morning, it
makes a great difference."

White Kegs to be Placed in Saloons
and Cigar Stores to Collect
Contributions
IDEA ORIGINATES WITH
THREE UNIVERSITY STUDENTS
Red Cross Will Distribute Collections
to Soldiers and Sailors in
Service
White kegs with hoops painted red
will appear tomorrow in thirteen city
saloons and cigar stores, to serve as
receptacles for gifts of tobacco to sold-
iers in France. Frank Freeman, '19,
LaVerne Stevens, '20, and James
Hoover, '21, 'are originators of the
plan.
Arrangements have been made with
the Red Cross organization whereby
the collections will be distributed
through that body, to the soldiers in
camp. Local dealers have agreed to
sell tobaccos without charging war
tax, if the purchases are thrpwn into
the barrels.
President Harry B. Hutchins is sup-
porting the project.
Large Contributions Expected.
It is expected that large quantities
of "smokes" will be collected as the
barrels are placed in locations where
there is a great deal of smoking, and
where men will be apt to contribute a
little from their own store, for the men
who have not the opportunity of get-

London, Oct. 29. - The steamer
which carried United States Senators
John D. Kendrick of Wyoming, and
William S. Kenyon of Iowa, and Rep-
resentatives John Rogers of Massa-
chusetts, and James S. Parker of New
York, was attacked by a German sub-
marine off the coast of Wales, Satur-
day.

area.

CAMPUS LOAN TOTAL IS
S1251155 BEYOND QUOTA
FINAL COMPILATION WILL BE AN-
NOUNCED LATER IN
WEEK
* * * * * * * * * * * * * *

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The gunners on the steamer opened
fire immediately, and the submarine
submerged before having time to
launch a torpedo. Senators Kendrick
and. Kenyon, and Representatives
Rogers and Parker, arrived in London
today to join the party of American
congressmen already here who are to
visit the various points in the war
area.

*
Late Results of the Liberty Loan *
Drive In University *
Total students' subscrip- *
tions to date.........$134,050 *
Total faculty bond pur-

r

chases ............ 191,100
Total University subscrip-
tion, to date..........325,150
Late returns Saturday
night- students 5,000
Faculty ..............1,000
Oversubscriptions in the
University.......... 125,155
Detailed reports and checkings
are being made by the auditors
* * * * * * * * * * * *

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MAY TAKE IN CUSTODY
ALL ALIENS' PROPERTY
FIRST RECEIPT FOR $100,000 IS IN-
VESTED IN GOVERNMENT
BONDS
Washington, Oct. 29.-Arrangements
were made today at a conference be-
tween President Wilson and A. Mitch-
ell Palmer, custodian of enemy prop-
erty, to put into complete operation
the provision of the trading, wjith the
enemy law, for custodian of property
in this country of German citizens, and
those of countries allied with Ger-
many.
Receipts of enemy property already
has begun, the first receipts being a
draft for $100,000, voluntarily tender-
ed the custodiai who promptly invest-
ed it in Liberty bonds.
Mr. Palmer said after a conference
with the president that he was pre-
paring to enforce the law as'it stands
for taking over property of citizens
of nations allied with Germany as well
as with all Germans.
Ultimate disposition of property tak-
en over by his office, Mr. Palmer ex-
plained, rests with congress which
must decide whether it shall be con-
faed:or merely helid in trust dur-
ing the war by the custodian as trus-
tee.

AMERICAN AND0 HUN
GUNS CONTINUE T[
SHEL ECH OTHEI
FALL OF SNOW DELAYS AL
OPERATIONS ON THE WEST-
ERN FRONT
SAMMIES TAKE TEUTON
WHO DIES AT HOSPITAI
Prisoner Asserted That German Sol
Biers Knew Nothing of U. S.
Troops In France.
(By Associated Press)
With the American Army in France
Oct. 29.-American batteries are co.
tinuing to shell German lines at regul
lar intervals, the enemy followin
similar tactics.
No official communication has bee
issued, but there has been no especil
infantry activity. Snow that felllas
night interfered with all operations.
The first German prisoner o
war taken by the American Expedi
tionary forces died today in an Ameri
can field hospital, having been shot
when he encountered an American pa
trol in No Man's Land in front of th
American trenches.
He, with another German, was dis
covered Saturday night by the patro
and was called upon to halt. The Ger
mans ran; the patrol fired, and one o
the enemy was hit. The prisoner wa
treated at a dressing station and re
moved to a field hospital, where the
combined efforts of several surgeons
failed to save his life.
The captured German was a mail
carrier and letters of some value were
found on him. He explained his pres
ence near the, American trenches say
ing he had lost his way in the dark.
He declared that the German soldiers
did not know that Americans were on
the front or in France, the ofcers tell
ing them nothing.
Women at Rest
In Alumnae Home

COAL MINE OPERATORS
FAIL TO GREE ON PRICE
DEALERS WARNED TO ORDER
DIRECT FROM SOURCES
OF SUPPLY
No agreement was reached yester-
day by the Michigan coal mine opera-
tors relative to price fixing, as recom-
mended by President Wilson, accord-
ing to reports issued from Lansing.
Coal Administrator Prudden has as-
serted that the operators almost
agreed to give him 25 per cent of the
mines in the state, but no further con-
firmation of the word has been re-
ceived.

i

ting tobacco.
The barrels were donated by the
Woolworth store, and hauled to a, fra-'
ternity house where they were painted
by the students. The horse and wagon
used, and which will serve again in
hauling the barrels to their destina-
tions, was also donated.
Proprietors of the establishments, in
which barrels will be placed, co-op-
erated willingly. Only one refused,
and that was because he said he lack-
ed room but offered to contribute $2
worth of tobacco every month.

GIRLS SEND
LETTERS

FOUR
WEEKLY

try.

OCTOBER ISSUE OF MICHIGAN
TECHNIC APPEARS TOMORROW
The October number of the Michigan
Technic, publication of the engineer-
ing college, will be put tomorrow. In
addition to regular departments, F. J.
Griffiths of the Central Steel company
will present an article on chrome van.
adium steel, a metallurgist of the same
company writes on alloy steel and a
German student in electrical engineer-
ing, on the war situation in Germany.
The editorial discusses the Students'
Friendship war fund.
Dean Effinger Talks To Students' Club
Prof. John R. Efinger gave an illus-
trated talk on "The Mediaeval Drama
and the Church" Sunday evening be-
fore the Students' society of the Uni-
tarian church. This was one of a ser-
ies of regular Sunday night lectures
which the Students' society is giving,
and to which the public is invited.
During the month of September 704
aeroplanes were lost or disaled along
the western front.

{
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Dealers Warned
Dealers throughout the -state have
been warned to telegraph their orders
to thefmines at once so that part of the
output of the shippers may be diverted
to the small consumers' bins. Mr.
Prudden declares that the retailers
must not expect that he will be able
to furnish them coal alone, they must
do their part in ordering and purchas-
ing from the source. The dictator
seems to feel that he can get consid-
erable coal shipped to some concen-
tration point, which will serve as an
emergency supply station.
Mayor Obtains Coal
Five cars of anthracite coal have
been obtained through the efforts of
Mayor Wurster of Ann Arbor for the
city's emergency fuel supply. Mr
Wurster got the coal through Adminis-
trator Garfield.
The coal is now on its way to the
city, according to a letter from Mr.
Garfield to the mayor. On its arrival
the plans for the distribution will be
made public.

Investigation Shows Average Universi-
ty Woman Is Writing Four Letters
Weekly To Soldiers
At last there is one place found
where no economy is demanded nor
desired. That is in the use of postage
stamps, when beginning with Thurs-
day morning, there will be an extra
green stamp on every letter.
And it is not for the sake of the
men in the trenches that a lack of
economy is urged. The revenue from
letters will be tremendous. Take
statistics of University women writing
to soldiers and examine them. After
preparing a list of 50 average girls
and the number of letters sent by them
to soldiers we find that approximately
four letters per week are sent by each
girl from Ann Arbor to training camp
and trench.
There are about 1,000 women enroll-
ed in the University. This means that
the increase in postal rates on first
class mail will equal $40 per week,
and in the school year provided the
rate does not fall off, this amount
would be almost equivalent to seven
$50 Liberty bonds.

According to the latest figures ob-
tainable from Prof. W. A. Paton, aud-
itor of tht University Liberty loan
committee, the total subscription from
both students and faculty amount to
$325,155 with the oversubscription es-
timated at $125,155.
Approximately $6,000 worth of the
issue came in late Saturday night, for
which the University will get credit.
Of this addition, $1,000 will go to the
faculty lists, making their total $191,-
100, while the remaining $5,000 boosts
the students' purchase to $134,050.
Official Announcement Soon
Compilation of the final figures of
the Loan will be made later in the
week. The task of arranging all the
material in classified for m according
to the governmental regulations, is
no small undertaking, according to
committee members.
It is estimated that no new additions
will be made to the present totals, al-
though some of them may be changed
slightly. The figures for yesterday
are approximations of the auditor
and'will vary but slightly.
On the whole, the loan exceeded the
hopes of the committee and all those
interested in the campaign. The over-
subscription was more than half of the
original.quota solicited from the Uni-
versity, $200,000.
WOMEN'S ORGANIZATIONS
WORK AT ANGELL HOUSE

WRITERS TOLD TO
WORK CONSTANTLY
The Only Way To Became Proficient,
Says Harold Titus, '11, Popular
Story Writer
"The only way you can learn to
write, is to write, and to write all the
time," was the advice given by Har-
old Titus, '11, popular magazine writ-
er and graduate of the Army stores
course, in the first of a series of lec-
tures given to journalism students at
10:30 o'clock yesterday morning in
room 102 West hall. His subject was
"Things I Wish I Had Known Upon
Entering the Magazine Game."
"The trouble with most beginners,"
he continued, "is that they attempt to
treat the subjects that are most for-
eign to them. Don't try to write stor-
ies dealing with the slums of the large
cities or about incidents in Mexico.
While in Ann Arobr write athletic
stories and stories pertaining to the
University. If you think you can write
as a pastime, and at night, and do reg-
ular work in the daytime, you will find
that you will not have the vitality.
The best way to begin is to get into the
work up to your ears."
Mr. Titus will give his next lecture
at 10:30 o'clock tomorrow in the same
room.

Enlisted Men Insured For $25,000,000
Policies aggregating $25,000,000
have been issued by the bureaus of
war risk insurance of the treasury de-
partment on the lives of enlisted men
Premiums for a $10,000 policy are $6.30
a month for men from 15 to 17 years
of age, with progresive increases for
older men. The minimum amount of
insurance that may be taken out is
$1,000.

Rainy Season Ahead Says Professor
No reason can be assigned by Prof.
William J. Hussey, director of the
Observatory, for the unusual amount
of rainfall Ann Arbor has experienced
for the past month. He takes it very
philisiphically and simply says that
we are in for a long rainy season.
Professor Hussey sends in a report
each day on the temperature and rain-
fall of the previous 24 hours. A rec-
ord of these reports shows that the

Women's house organizations are re-
sponding well to the call for pledg-
ing of hours for work at the Red
Cross surgical dressings headquarters
at Angell home. Over a third tf the
houses have already pledged.
The girls are giving on the average
of two hours a piece. Jean Maclennan,
'19, who is receiving the reports of the
pledges, urges that the rest of the
houses send in reports immediately.
Mrs. Dean Loree, whois supervising
the work at Angell house, says that
there is work for every girl, whether
she has taken a course in Red Cross
work or not. She says that the girls
are doing their work in a creditable
manner.
Fifteen nations have severed rela-
tions with Germany or declared war
on her since the United States enter-
ed the conflict on April 6.

Revenue Stamps Levied on Parcel Post
Washington, Oct. 29. - Beginning
Dec. 1, all parcel post packages re-
quiring a postage of 25 cents or more.
must bear an internal revenue stamp.
as provided in the war tax bill.
The postoffice department announc-
ed today that regular postage stamps
will not be valid for this payment.
Special internal revenue stamps will
be furnished. The tax rate will be one
cent for each 25 cents of postage or
part thereof above 25 cents.

After Being Chased Around Campus
for Several Weeks They Enter
Haven of Refuge
Sixteen Michigan women have at
last ceased their wanderings and are
now permanently located in Alumnae
residence hall at 1227 Washtenaw ave-
nue.
Their experience for the past month
is reminiscent of gypsy life. For the
first two weeks of school, these stu-
dents lived at 237 South Ingalls street,
from whence they were driven by
cruel fate and coal shortage. An un-
certain record has been preserved of
their itinerary from then on, but it' is
supposed that friends, relatives, and
sorority sisters came to the rescue,
opened their doors as well as their
hearts to the unfortunates, and took
them in out of the rain.
However, their troubles are over, for
the new residence hall became habit-
able last week, although the first floor
is not entirely settled as yet. One of
the most conspicuous features of the
living room, by the way, is Dean Myra
B. Jordan's victrola, which is now di-
viding its time between Alumnae hall
and the Jordan home.
This residence is entirely the gift
of University ofuMichiganralumnae
women, and is run on the dormitory
plan, under the supervision if Miss
Sarah Truair Hollands, social direc-
trix, and Mara Prange, '18, who is
househead
About 1,000 carloads of peaches, or
aboutgone-ninth of the total crop of
New York state, rotted because grow-
ers were unable to get cars to send
the fruit to market.

average for 20 years is 30.9 inches.

t ft m k

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