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October 27, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-10-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WEATHER
AND COLDER
TODAY

A6V
AMO

& tit

ASSOCIATI
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT
SERVICE

XXVIII. No. 23.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, OCTO ER 27, 1917.

PRICE THREE CE

PRICE THREE CI

razil Enters

World

Conflict

Against Kaise

__

MICHIGAN SPIRIT
IGNITED BY FIRE
OF MASS MEETING
SPEAKERS INSTILL PEP INTO AS-
SEMBLAGE 01F STU-.
DENTS
PATTENGILL TURNS TO
TALE OF FORMER GLORY
Jackson ,Smith, and Prof. I. L. Sbarf.
man Talk; Band Turns Out
for Occasion
"It isn't a fair deal," said 'Vic' Pat-
tengill at the Nebraska pep meeting
last night. "Here you have the fight-
en'est team that you have had in five
years and there are empty seats in
the house."
"I thought I would get out of foot-
ball this year: But when the gang
from Lansing, that came down here to
see Kalamazoo Normal trim Michigan,
came back and said that the old team
had more fight than ever before, I
could not resist the desire to be in
the bleachers the next week, and I
have been there every game since.
Present Team Produces Results
"If a team working under normal
conditions a few years ago had turned
out to a pep meeting and found an
empty seat, they would have had rea-
son for disappointment. Today you
have a team that has produced results
in spite of the most adverse conditions
possible, and here there are more em-
pty seats than I can count."
Pattengill was evidently aroused be-
cause of the fact that a suggestion had
been made to the effcet that there was
a doubt of the Yostmen's being vic-
torious today.

UNION ANNOUNCES
1917-18 CHAIRMEN

Heads of Three Committees Still Un-
named; Appointments
Later.
Chairmen of committees for the year
1917-18 have been announced -by
George F. Hurley, '18L, president of
the Union, as follows: Intercolle-
giate intelligence bureau, Prof. Clyde
Love; employment bureau, Thom
Reilly, '20; department of publicity,
A. E. Horne, '18; Sunday afternoon
meeting committee, F. C. Bell, '19.
General chairmen for this year have
been appointed as follows: Opera, Al-
an L. Livingston, '18E; Union activi-
ties steering committee, Lansing
Thoms, '18E; dance committee, Harold
Easley, '18L.
The chairmen of the Spotlight vau-
deville, war affairs committee, and
the house committee will be announc-
ed later.
FRENCH CONTINUE PRESS
AGINST CRO'WN PRINCE
LAON OBJECTIVE OF ALLIED
DRIVE NORTH OF THE
AISNE RIVE, B
Paris, Oct. 16.-With the important
railroad junction of Laon their ob-
jective, the French troops are contin-
uing their press against the forces of
the German Crown Prince, north of
the Aisne river. In another attack on
the right, the village of Filain has
been captured.
The Austro-German armies on the
Isonzo front are fast developing their
offensive against the Italians. Al-
ready the Italians on the northern
wing of the' 25 mile front have been
forced to give. ground and at several
places are back across the Isonzo,
north and south of Tolmino, where the
battle is waging on Italian territory.
The combined German and Austro-
Hungarian forces, up to the present,
are declared by the Berlin war office
to have captured 30,000 prisoners and
more than 300 guns.
The German retreat along the north-
ern Rusian front still continues. Rus-
sians endeavoring to take up the pur-
suit have reached the Riga-Orel rail-
way, but have not come within sight
of the enemy.
The Daily Cub
Sees It Through;

MAJORITY HOUSES
FAVOR OBSERVAINCE
O FATLESS- DAYS
FORTY ONE FRATERNITIES HAVE
ALREAD)Y JOINED MOVE-
MENT
SORORITIES ANXIOUS
TO "DO THEIR BIT"

Variety of Substitutes Used
Place of Meat and
Wheat

In

-~
s
ANN ARBOR'S ECONOMY ON LUXURiES
WILL HIT THE HOHENZOLLERNS HARD

VOTE PUTS NATIOI
IN BIG STRUGGI
ONLY ONE DISSENTING BALLOT
COUNT TAKEN BY CHA2MBER
OF DEPUTIES.
RESULT IS RECEIVED
WITH ACCLAMATIC

Brazil Makes Eighteenth
Fighting Against
Gemany

Na

Students Try Out New Yell
After his speech he showed the
crowd how to give a new yell suggest-
ed by Tuthill. The cheer is "Come on!
Gang! Come on! Gang! Fight! Fight!
Fight!"' with the emphasize on the
"gang."
Prof. I. Leb Sharfman followed the
suggestion of yesterday's Daily and
showed that even Nebraska would get
something out of the defeat today.
"Hal" Smith, '16, used his allotment
of time to point out four points which
would tend to insure victory this aft-
ernoon. These four are the coach,
the trainer, the individual efforts of
the players, and the efforts of the men
in the bleachers.
Jackson Gives Comparison
H. C. L. Jackson, ex-'18, compared
the football field with Camp Custer.
He proved that they both tended to
produce the same thing, namely, better
citizens of the United States.
The attendance was estimated at
about 3,000. This was somewhat larger
than the attendance a week ago. The
enthusiasm was regarded as greater
than that shown at any Michigan
meeting this season.
Band is Present
The band was very noticeably pres-
ent and materially aided the efforts
of Pattengill, the cheerleaders, "Skee"
Poleski and "Bud" Knowlson, and the
others in stirring up the Michigan
spirit.
"Bob" McDonald, '18, managing ed-
itor of The Michigan Daily, acted as
chairman of the meeting.
Girls Join in Cheering
One feature of the meeting was sev-
eral yells given by the girls in the
first balcony. These were received
with considerable enthusiasm by the
men on the main floor.
The program ended with the sing-
ing of the "Yellow and Blue" by the
entire assemblage, with the accompan
iment of the band,

Forty-two out of 73 fraternities, sor-
orities, boarding houses, hotels, and
restaurants in Ann Arbor are now ob-
serving Tuesday as the regulation
meatless day. With the exception of
four houses, which set aside Tuesday
and Thursday as meatless, the reg-
ulation day is in vogue.
Reports from the different boarding
houses show that 14 fail to observe any
wheatless day, and nine do not recog-
nize any meatless day. Practically
all of the houses agree to conform to
the regulation days if the others follow
suit.
Fraternity Observes Sweetless Day
The Alpha Delta Phi fraternity is
is the only place setting aside a sweet-
less day. The remainder of the can-
vassed houses have been forced to ec-
onomize on sugar, due to the present
shortage in Ann Arbor.
A number of the fraternities com-
mence observing meatless and wheat-
legs days next week, and up to the
present time the plan has been fol-
lowed in a haphazard fashion. The
Eremites have had meatless and wheat-
less days since Oct. 1.
Many Substitutes Used
Bran, corn,'graham and rye bread
are being used as a substitute for
wheat bread. According to reports
from thd, different stewards there is
little saving in employing a sub-
stitute, inasmuch as a larger quantity
of butter, eggs and sugar. has had to
be used.
Eggs, fish, cheese, nuts, salads,
beans, macaroni and spaghetti are
generally served on the meatless days.
The saving on this particular item is
approximately one-fourth.
Meat Once a Day at Martha Cook
"The girls have meat only once a
day," said the stewardess of Martha
Cook. "No meat is served on Fri-
day, however. We do not observe any
wheatless day, but there is usually one
day in the week, that we eliminate
white bread, except at breakfast."
Members of the Kappa Alpha Theta
have a meatless day on Friday and a
wheatless one on Wednesday. Fish is
used as a substitute. "Like it fine,"
said one member yesterday.
Friday is meatless and Wednesday
wheatless at the Westminister house
No definite arrangement has as yet
been made concerning the sugar prob-
lem.

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THE LIBERTY LOAN AS IT
STANDS IN MICHIGAN
TODAY
Total student subscrip-
tions .................'$102,000
Total faculty purchase. 167,900
Total University sub-
scription to date ........ 269,900
Yesterday's student pur-
chase ................... 2,500
Faculty total yesterday. 24,350
Oversubscription in the
University ..............69,900
Applications received up till 10
o'clock this morning. Room 268,
Engineering building.
If YOU haven't bought YOUR
bond it is not too late NOW.
* * * * * * * * * * *

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LIBERTY LOAN TO0 MAKE
FINISHING SPURT TODAY
INFLUX OF ELEVENTH-HOUR SUB-
SCRIPTIONS IS EX-
PECTED

US NOT EXERCISING
POWERS, OF SEI1ZURE
PROF. R. T. CRANE DEFENDS
GOVERNMENT'S RECENT
ACTION.
"Our country is not seizing any
one's property, nor is it taking in-
come from property of non-resident
Germans and using it," said Prof. R.
T. Crane yesterday when questioned
concerning the so-called seisure of
enemy property by the government.
"This act of the government," Pro-
fessor Crane explained, "is only a pro-
tective measure to insure safety to
those corporations owned by Ger-
mans who are not resident and who,
for the remainder of the war, will
not be able to hold communication
with their firms here."
According to Professor Crane, the
whole transaction is purely that of
trusteeship, whereby, according to the
law, the trustee must look after hte
best interests of his client and in-
crease the property.
Liberty loans are a safe investment
and bring a reasonable rate of inter-
est. They will prevent managers
of German firms in this country from
havingtoofrke a control over corpora-
tion property.
Property of alien residents is not to
be disturbed under this arrangement.
"The arrangement is a matter of
safety for German companies who will
not have a chance to communicate
their wishes during the war," Pro-
fessor Crane said in closing.
STAMP ORDER LET

Rio Janeiro, Oct. 26.-The Chamber
of Deputies today by an almost unani-
mous vote declared that a state of
war existed between Germany and
Brazil. The vote was 149 to 1. Pres-
ident Bra has sanctioned the pro-
clamation of a state of war.
The tribunes of the Chamber were
filled to capacity. After a debate on
the opportunities of proclaiming mar-
tial law, the president of the diplo-
matic commission spoke in favor of
a law as follows:
"A state of war between Brazil and
Germany is hereby acknowledged and
proclaimed. The president of the re-
public is authorized to adopt all meas-
ures enunciated in his message of Oct.
18 and to take all the steps pending
to insure national defense and public
security."
The virtually unanimous vote of
the deputies was received with gener-
al acclamation. Brazil makes the
eighteenth 'nation fighting against
Germany. The Senate unanimously
approved the proclamation of a state
of war.
ANNOUNCE RESIGNATIO
OF ITALIAN CABNE
NO CHANGES IN FOREIGN POLICY
EXPECTED AS RESULT
OF FALL.
Rome, Italy, Oct. 26.-The resigna-
tion of the Italian cabinet was an-
nounced today by Bosselli. The gov-
ernment yesterday was defeated in the
chamber of deputies when a vote of
confidence failed 314 to 96.
Washington, Oct. 26.-No change in
Italy's foreigq policy nor weakening
of her aggressive prosecution of the
war is expected as a result of the fall
of the Bosselli cabinet. ' Official dis-
patches from Rome today say that be-
fore the failure of a vote of confidence
in the Chamber of deputies yesterday,
the entire chamber enthusiastically
applauded a speech by Foreign, Minis-
ter Sonnino reviewing the internation-
al situation, calling phases of'- the
Pope's peace proposal pro-German,
and declaring the intention of Italy
to fight until victory is won.
According to advice received here,
the fall of the cabinet was due solely
to the dissatisfaction over the admin-
istration of food. In the reconstruct-
ed government Baron Sonnino will be
retained at the head of the foreign
office.
New Library To Have Improvements
No longer will the student hang up
coat and hat in the 'Library "at his
own risk." Neither will he laboriously
plod up and down stairs. There will
be an elevator in the new building
and a cloak room on each floor.

Michigan's first 1917 Gargoyle is
out and the cub is endeavoring to
fulfill the assignment of the city edi-
tor, and the demands of the powers-
that-be in the Gargoyle,-the first to
keep his job, and the second in view
of the possibility of saving 25 cents.
The C. E. said "six inches," the fun-
ny guy "six columns." The first said
"make it snappy," the second "make
it mysterious; we want to sell the
thing."
"Let me see it," i asked timidly
(small letter very appropriate).
"NIX," said the Gargoylian (capital
letters also appropriate) "you would
give it away. Remark about the cov-
er by Reed Bachman, '20, about the i1-
lustrations, whether they are snappy
or not, play up the feature of ex-
cerps from letters by a Michigan man
now at Camp Allentown, something
new, speak about the women contrib-
uters, also new, about the four full
pages of illustrations. You know, I'd
do it myself, but I gotta go down town.
"Here's a copy, leave it on my
desk."

Girls Economize on Sugar
Marion Holden, '18, stewardess of
Alpha Phi, said, "We are observing
meatless days regularly on Tuesday
and Friday. Wednesday is our wheat-
leis day. The girls are making in-
d idual efforts to economize on sugar.
e save approximately 24 pounds of
meat a week. The girls themselves
suggested setting aside two days on
which no meat would be served,''
"Tuesday is our meatless day," stat-
ed Harriet Briggs, '18, stewardess of
Pi Beta Phi. "We do not observe a
wheatless day exclusively, but three
or four times a week we have corn
bread or muffins. We expect to begin
economizing on sugar soon. As a
(Continued on Page Four)

Ready for its final spurt today, the
University's Liberty loan quota reach-
ed a total of $269,900 last night. The
oversubscription now amounts to $69,-
900.
Student bond sales for the day took
a slump to $2,500, but the faculty
purchase of $24,350 brought the total
for the past 24 hours to a better marg-
in for the University. The entire
faculty sale of bonds for the drive is
$167,900 while the student quota is
$102,000, a trifile over half the Univer-
sity allotment.
"We are more than satisfied with the
results of the campaign, which is a
fine demonstration of Michigan spirit,"
declared Francis Bacon, '02, executive
chairman of the committee. "The com-
mittee did not expect that the over-
subscription would be so large as it is,
nor so large as it will yet be.
We expect quite an influx of elev-
enth-hour folk's subscriptions. The
bonds that will be bought now will b3
by those who want to get in on the
finish. This is a national affair, and
I am very glad that Michigan has
shown her breadth of spirit."
(Continued on Page Six)

Bureau

Will Engrave 868,000,000
"Three-Centers"

Washington, Oct. 26.-The post of-
fice department has placed an official
order with the bureau of engraving
and printing for 868,000,000 three-
cent stamps, in anticipation of the new
postal rates which become effective
November 2.
Requisition also has been made for
three-cent stamped envelopes and two.-
cent postal cards.t

15c The Copy

For Sale Everywhere

I

ut

oday

11

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