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October 26, 1917 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-10-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


1V11V1 "i

,-

anu UIv
S BUSINI

t t * t *$t *ss S S S" s
1* s
* AT THE THEATERS

SOLDIERS TO DEVELOP
FARM LANDS of GREECEI

Lail

UNIVERSITY PLANS TO
INSTRUCT U.S.SOLIERS
COURSES WILL BE GIVEN AT
CAMP CUSTER AND SELF-
RIDGE FIELD.

FRI
T.

hSHMEN TEAM PRIMED FOR
TILT WITH M. A. C. YEARLINGS
(Continued from Page Three)

Dancing every Saturday at Arr
ory from 9 to 12. Admission 75c.-Ad
WHITNEY

*

RISM HAS BENEFICIAL EF-;
ECT ON WHOLESALE
TRADE
ts on trade for the past, week
ouraging. Although the ab-
conditions occasioned by the
re led to certain irregularities
ness, accepted barometers in-
.creases in all lines of business.
especially true in the whole-
,de, though trading in futures
n curtailed. Wholesale prices
ing off on account of Hoover-
the movement has not affected
>rices appreciably. The best
come from the West, North-
ad South.
etail trade is somewhat slow-
e ultimate consumer is buy-
h considerable caution. These
ena are said to be due to the
loan campaign, toe army en-
ts, and the fact that retail
ave not reached a;low enough
treet's journal estimates an in-
of 8.9 per cent in bank clear-
r the past week. The number
aess failures has also been be-
average for corresponding
luring the past five years.
-_
's Athletic Fund Goes For Bond
Women's athletic association
ested all of its available funds,
ing to $100; in a Liberty bond.
money, together with $462 de-
with the University treasurer,
ited the Palmer field club
'und. At first, the executive
f the association planned to in-
entire amount, but upon inves-
it was found that the $462
n previously placed by Univer-
ecutives.
AEMEL TO TALK AT FIRST
ETING OF PRESCOTT CLUB

*
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YOU CAN GO TO-
"A Cure for Curables," at the
Garrick.
TODAY
Whitney-"The Price She Paid."
Majestic-"The Bridal Twirl."
Orpheum-Louise Glaum in the
"Idolaters."

~*
"
'*
*
*

,
Wuerth-George Beban in "Lost *
In Transit.

Arcade-Alice Joyce and Harry
Morey in "Within. the Law."
Rae-Owen Moore in "Under
Cover."

*
*
*
*
*
S

* * S * s * S * * * s * s *
AT THE WHITNEY.,
Happy Lou Whitney and her asso-
ciates presented "The Price She*Paid"j
last evening as the midweek change
of play at the Whitney.
The story is unique and novel, op-
ening with a prologue in Goldfield,
Nev., and jumping to diplomatic Wash-
ington for the remaining three acts.
Miss Whitney in the role of a dance
hall piano player, was excellent, and
the rest of the cast had splendid roles.
For the first half of the week, com-
mencing Sunday, W. C. Hermann's
great Irish-American story, ."Peggy
O'Moore," will be the offering. This is
one of the latest releases )and is full
of patriotism and comedy.
ALUMNI WILL CONTINUE TO
CATER AT UNION DANCES
Michigan alumni will continue to
serve refreshments at the Union
dances.
The plan of the alumni to cater at
the affairs was given an initial trial
Saturday night. Homer Heath, '07,
general secretary of the Union, is en-
thusiastic about the inovation and ex-
pressed himself to the effect that the
plan be put into permanent execu-
tion.
The moifey which is realized from
the sale of the refreshments will be
used to help support the Michigan
branch of the American university
union in Paris.
STUNTS AND DANCE FEATURE
LEAGUE MEMBERSHIP PARTY

4,000 SQUARE MILES OF LAND TO#
BE BROUGHT UNDER
CULTIVATION
Athens, Sept. 17.-(By mail.)-Depu-
ty Choremsi of the Greek chamber of,
deputies is the representative of the,
government in the gigantic farming
project for developing Macedonia, in1
which 4,000 square miles will be farm-
ed by 10,000 soldier-farmers, mobiliz-
ed like an army and living in tents on
the farmland.
"The development of Macedonia is
an outcome of the European war," said
Mr. Choremsi today. "It is in reality
a war-farm, for the war demonstrated
for the first time that Greece needed'
to produce more wheat and cereals at
home. While it had plenty of land, yet
it was buying two-thirds of its wheat
from foreign countries. Out of the
three million bushels it consumed
every year, it grew only one million
here and brought the other two mil-
lions from foreign countries. Greece
found herself unable to get the foreign
wheat she had always depended on.
It meant short supplies, and bread
rations, and a hard trial for the
people.
"The government is now going to
assist in making Greece self-support-
ing in foodstuffs, and this is going to
be one of the most useful economic
lessons of the war. We have plenty
of rich land in Macedonia, acquired
from Turkey as a result of the Balkar
wars, and the government now gives
250,000 acres of this land rent free fo'-
a period of five years. A company has
been formed with a capital of '$8,000,-
000 to carry out the project.
"Under the arrangement made, the
government has the first right to the
entire stock of wheat and foodstuffs
produced. But if the government does
not want the whole or part of the pro-
duct, then the wheat and other pro-
ducts are to be sold at prices fixed
by the government. This gives the
government a food stock to rely upon,
and also permits it to fix the price at
which the food is to be sold to private
consumers.

Camp Custer and Selfridge Field
will receive instructions from the Uni-
versity this winter, according to plans
just completed by the University ex-
tension department.
"We will not teach the history of
Germany, as we will that of Russia,
England and France, we will remake
it," said Registrar Arthur G. Hall yes-
terday in discussing plans for lecture
courses.
Instruction will fall into three
groups. Courses in French, physics,
map reading, and astronomy will be
given for those who are studying to
become teachers of the drafted army.
Lectures on history and current
events for instructional purposes will
be offered to all.
Slides and films owned by the Uni-
versity will be utilized for talks of a
recreational kind, and 50 lectures of
this nature will be given during the
seasons.
Both the Y. M. C. A. and the Knights
of Columbus are cooperating with the
University in procuring adequate
meeting places.
All the professors who will lecture'
have not yet been definitely chosen,
but it is announced that Prof. W. D.
Henderson, Prof. Moritz Levi, and
Prof. E. L. Curtis will offer courses
at both camps.

7

which one of his star linesmen he
should start first in the game.
Carpus, a former halfback is show-
ing good form at end. His ability to
pick passes out of the air puts him
in a class with Boville, Flecher, and
Stuart on the flank position.
Hobbs who probably will start th-a
game at guard Saturday, has been
holding down center during the week.
He makes the fourth good center, along
with Clippert, Mac Nickol, and Hobie
that Mitchell has on his string.
The other sub linesmen making the
regulars fight for their places are,
VonWagner and Tinchac and either
one of them can play guard or tackle
when called upon.

HAPPY LOU WHITNEY
And Asseciates
TONIGHT
The Price She Paid
A new Comedy Drama
Coming Sunday Night
PEGGY 0' MOORE
Better than "Peg O' My Heart"
EVENINGS 8:15 110-2046c
MATINEES WED.-SAT 10e

I

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FORMER MICHIGIAN MEN
RECEIVE APPUINTMENTS

SIX MEN STATIONED AT ALLEN-
TOWN GIVEN FIRST LIEUTEN-
ANT COMMISSIONS

e Prescott club of the College of
macy has called its first meeting
e year for 7 o'clock Monday even-
October 29, in Room 30tl of the
nistry building. Dr. Henry
emer, who became professor of.
rmacognosy at the beginning of
year, will be the principal speak-
He will discuss the part which the
nization plays among the , stu-
;s. The club and its plans for the
r will be explained by the officers.
s this is the open meeting of the
, the time when organization will
>erfected for the year's work, it is
ed that the attendance will be
e. All students registered in the
rmacy college,, the freshmen es-
ally, are urged to attend.,

I

h Metal Thieves at Camp Custer
tle Creek, Mich., Oct. 25.-Com-
m of the cantonments at Camp
r will mark time for the con-
ion of two million cubic feet of
iouses. Construction forces at
amp will be thrown into this new
as soon as possible.
itary police are stationed at the
nal loop of the Michigan railway
event workers from stealing met-

The Women's league membership
party in Barbour gymnasium yester-
day afternoon was an all-round suc-
cess.
Wyvern planned the entertainment
hour and the stage in the Sarah Cas-
well Angell hall was used for their
purpose. The stunts presented were
in the nature of pantomime and sil-
houette acts based on Mother Goose
rhymes and ditties.,
Afterwards the girls went down to
the gym where music, dancing and re-
freshments were enjoyed. Through
the efforts of the older students sever-
al new memberships were secured.

"The government supplies the farm
labor, mobilizing it the same as
soldiers- are mobilized for the front,
but the company pays the wages at
about 80 cents a day. The first real
start will be made next spring, as it
was too late this year to complete
plans and get the farming machinery
from America. The orders already
placed there call for $1,600,000 worth
of steam tractors, rakes, reapers, etc.
STATE RAILWAY CO1MISSION
OBJECTS TO INTERFERENCE
Lansing, Mich., Oct. 25.-That repre-
sentatives of the common carriers'
work to antagonize the public mind
against the state railroad commission,
was the assertion of Commissioner
Cassius L. Glasgow today. "They are
endeavoring to create in the public
mind a belief that it is to the advant-
age of the shippers to have all rail-
road matters handled by the national
commission.
"If all matters were handled by the
interstate commission it would re-
quire the unwinding of much red tape
in Washington and in many cases trips
to the national capitol to adjust mat-
ters. This would be an unjust burden
on the man who has a claim of $2.50
for instance, against a railroad.
The commission cited instances
where appeal to the state commission
brought immediate action in the move-
ment of small freight shipments,
which on an appeal to Washington
would have resulted in the loss of
much time. One was the case of a
wagon for shipment at bimondale
which lay on a station platform for
three weeks because train crews said
it could wait a carload shipment to
Chicago. On the day appeal was made
to the state commission the wagon
was loaded out.

Michigan men are coming to the
front.
That is the substance of a letter
from Sergeant Harry R. Louis, '19,
to Homer L. Heath, '07, general sec-
retary of the Union. Louis is stationed
at the concentration camp at Allen-
town, Pa., with section 590 of the Un-
ited States army ambulance service.
According to Louis, the following
Michigan men have been granted first
lieutenancies: Glenn M. Coulter, '18L,
Earl E. Pardee, '17, Earl H. McCauley,
'19, Fred G. Beattie, Edward P. Turn-
er, and. Louis C. Andrews.
"Many more are about to take the
examinations," says Louis, "and it is
a pretty safe bet that in nine or ten
months section 590 will not be a rep-
resentative Michigan section. Section
590 has already set the best record of
any section in camp in regard to com-
}Missions."
He says that two of the Michigan
sections at Allentown are goings to at-
tendthe Michigan-Pennsylvania game
at Philadelphia in a body.
"It is my earnest desire," concludes
Louis, "to keep in close touch with
the Union, which is really the organiz-
ation which started us on our cam-
paign in the United States army ambul-
ance service."

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I

picy News From.
)ther Universities
tudy of German at the University
Wisconsin has decreased almost
e-half even though the registra-
n in the romance language course
increased.- A greater interest is
own in the study of French.
A. new roll-call system has been
opted in the women's gym classes
the University of Kansas. At the'
ginning of the year each woman re-
ves a white button with a number
nted on it. The button is worn on
gym suit, and it is then a simple
tter to check up the numerals when
class is lined up according to
mber.
Liberty Loan week at Harvard re-
ted in a total of $35,370, represent-
g 348 subscribers. Several $1,000
nds were taken and many ranging
tween that amount and $100, but
e majority of the subscriptions were
$50. The response of men of mod-
ate means to the loan was excellent.
MAJESTIC
EVE. 7:30-9. 20o, 25c 50c
MAT. 351. M. IOc, and 20o.
3 Days Com.. Thur.
Oct.25
BOYLE WOLFOLK'S
MUSICAL,
COMEDY CO.,
with
Guy Voyer
and
-30-PEOPLE-30-1
Smart and Talented
PRETTY CHORUS GIRLS
1000 Laughs
Sunday Only
MAR Y PiCKFORD
"THE LITTLE AMERICAN"
Her greatest sensation

WILLIAM HODGE In
"A CURE FOR CURALES~
A New Four Act Comedy Drama
RAE THEATRE
HAZEL DAWN and OWEN
MOORE in "Under Cover."
Buy a Rae Ticket Book and SAVE
ARCADE
Fri 26-Alice Joyce and Harry Morey in
"Within the Law." 8 Parts.
Sat-27-itarle Williams in "Transgres-
sion," and Comedy.
Mon.-29Harold Lockwood in "Paradise
Garden" and Drew Comedy "The Pat-
riot"
Tues-3o-Mabel Taliaferro in "Will-o'-
the-Wisp" and Drew Comedy, "His
Ear for Music."
-- -
!! 1!! U!!!!!1!!!1!!!!!! I1!!11!!!lil 11111 H
SWuerthTheatre
BOOKINGS FOR OCTO.BER
Prices: 's Cents
_ Matinees 2, 3:30. Nights 6:30, 8, 9:30
Saturdays-Sundays-Continuous
Thur-Fri-2s-26-Geo. Beban in "Lost in
Transit." Also Keystone Comedy.
Sat-27-Jackie Saunders in "Betty Be -+
Good." Also Serial, "Neglected
Wife," No. 8.
= Sun-Mon-28-29-Mary Pickford in "Re-
becca of Sunnybrook Farm." Also =
Holmes Travels and Victor Moore
Comedy.
Tues-Wed-3o 3i-Taylor Holmes in "Effi-
ciency EIdgar's Courtship." Also a,
Reel Comedy, "Day and Night."
OrpheumTheatre
BOOKINGS FOR OCTOBER
aPrices: roc unless otherwise specified
. Matinees a, 3:30. Nights 6". o, 8, 9:30
Saturdays-Sundays-Continuous.
Fri-26-Louisa Glaum in "The Idola-
ters" Also Triangle Comedy and
= Ford. "=
= Sat-ax-Baby M. Osborne in "Fear and
- Smile." Also Mutual Comedy and
- Travels.
- Sun-28-Shirley Mason in "The Awak=
ening of Ruth." Also "Do Children
Count?" =
. Mon-29-Miss Juliette Da in "The.=
= Rainbow Girl." Also Serial, "Lost .
=- ''xpress,"No -'
Tues-3o-Violet McMillan in "The Girl
e- Who Won Out." Also Weekly and
- Comedy.-
Wed.-i-Montage Love in "The Brand
of Satin." Meekly and Comedy. w
GOIIDHEW FLORALGCO,
225 E. Liberty. Phone 1821
Everything in the line of
fresh cut flowers
Corsages a Specialty
Greenhouses:- Observatory and
Volland St. Phone 17o-M

Pop.Mat.Wd.
Best Seats $1
Sat. Mat.
25C to $1.50

G#DEROTK

Wk. Oct.22
Nights
50C to $2.00

1

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Viii

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One of the features of the Michigan
Alumnus current issue is the part de-
voted to "Letters from the Front." In
this section thrilling experiences of
alumni depict the adventurous life of
those sent "over there" from Michigan.
Among the letters which hold par-
ticular interest are those from Capt.
James F. Breakey, Harper Hospital
unit, United States army hospital* No.
3; .Corporal Frank Thaddeus Belyea,
F. W. Zinn, observer in a flying squad-
ron; and Thomas F. McAllister, '18, of
the Michigan ambulance unit.
Another part of the periodical con-
tains a list of Michigan faculty mem-
bers and students who have answered
the call to the colors. Some of the
faculty who have enlistedmare Maj. R.
B. Canfield of the Medical school, Maj.'
Nellis B. Foster of the Medical school,
Capt. A. D. White of the engineering
college' and Maj. U. J. Wile of the
Medical school.

11- , , R---,

MICHIGAN ALUMNUS CONTAINS
LETTERS FROM "OVER THERE"

Cover More Territory
-By Telephone
THE telephone plays an important part in the
daily work of every up-to-the-minate salesman.
From established central points a much greater ter-
ritory can be covered via Bell toll lines than is possible
when a trip is made in person to see each customer or
prospect.
The advantages offered by Bell service enable salesmen to
conserve energy, save time and increase the volume or
their business.

Free Travel Warrants for U. S. Sailors
Base American Flotilla in British
Waters, Oct. 25.-Free travel warrants
good to any part of the British Isles
are now being issued to American offi-
cers and men as the result of an ar-
rangement between the British and
American governments. This free
transportation enables the Americans
to travel by rail and water from their
base here through Ireland over to
England and Scotland and back again
within their alloted time of leave,
usually ten days. It is extending to
the Americans a privilege long since
enjoyed by the British soldiers and
sailors.
WANTED- An opportunity to serve
you. Let us help you through this
column of The Michigan Daily.

Alice Joyce & Harry Morey
Within0th e Law
Bayard Veiller's Phenomenal Stage Success that ran for Sixteen
months on Broadway.
Produced under the personal supervision of J. Stuart Blackton.
READ WHAT THE CRITICS SAY ABOUT THIS PHOTOPLAY:
The picture is one whose every scene makes one more eager for
the next. The picture is bound to get 'over' with audiences who de-
mand high class, intelligently prepared entertainment. It is a credit
to Greater Vitagraph."-Motography.
"'Within the Law' thrilled and interested me."-President Wilson.
"As a good citizen I thank you for 'Within the Law."-Ex-Presi-
dent Roosevelt.
"'Within the Law' in pictures is greater than the 'play. It's worth
walking miles to see, and it's worth any price of admission anyone
cares to charge to have you see it."-"Zit," N. Y. Evening Journal.
"Everyone in the audience was bound to contrastathe screen ver-
sion with the play, and if the rest of the audience agreed with the
writer, they decided in favor of the silent dram."-N. Y. Trbune.

Time Limit For Opera Scenarios Close
Scenarios for the annual Michigan
Union opera must be turned in soon,
as the time limit for their acceptance
expires in=a comparatively short time.
George F. Hurley, '18L, president of
the Union, asks that those who have
scenarios bring them to his office as
soon as possible.

.=

THIS GREAT MELODRAMA MAY BE SEEN AT THE

Michigan State Telephone Company
J. . Kelly, Manager
Telephone 500

Arcade Theatre

- Mon., Oct

You can get those Neolin Soles put
on at Paul's Place, 611 E. William,
Phone 237.Adv.

TWENTY CENTS

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