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October 26, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-10-26

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-_ ,

THE WEATHER
COLDER; PROBABLE
RAIN TODAY

~r~flk i6r

:43 atl

ASSOCIATE]
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT MI
SERVICE'

L. XXVIII. No. 2.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 26, 1917.

PRICEI THREEI

NAW .

Jniversity

Oversubscribes

Its

Liberty

Loan

Quota

by

More

Than

$42,o

FRENCH SOISSONS
DRIVE' OCCUPIES
NEW ADVANTAGES
POILUS NOW IN SIGHT OF LAON
AND FACING AISNE
CANAL
DEMORALIZATION SEEN
IN PRISONERS' ORDERS
Enemy Abandon Large Quantities of
War stores; Captives Num-
ber 17,000
With the French armies in France,
Oct. g5.-The French victory of Tues-
day, northeast of Soissons, is still be-
ing extended.
Monkey mountain, east of Vauxaillon
village, and the greater part of the
forest of Pinon has been occupied. The
French now have Laou in sight and
face the Aisne canal. Contradictory
orders taken from prisoners show cer-
tain demoralization in the German
command and the question is Tasked
whether another pretreat is intended.

EDITOR CAN USE
U. S. MAILS AGAIN
James Helber May Send Paper As
Third Class Mail Matter Pending
Government Decision. .
Upon signing a sworn statement
that no editorial comment would be
made either on the war or regarding
the policies of the government, James
Helber, publisher of a local weekly
newspaper printed in German, was
permitted to mail this week's copy as
third class matter pending his applica-
tion for a renewal of second class
mailing privileges.
Second class privileges were taken
from Helber because of seditious and
disloyal utterances made in his paper
a short time ago. A decision by the
postoffice department at Washington
on the request for a renewal of the
privilege is expected within a few
days.
NEW DRAFT LAW READY1
FOR WILSON'S APPROVAL

r

MICHIlGAN SHOWS
.SPIRIT BY BIG
ITOTAL 0F8242,550
LARGE INCREASE EXPECTED DUR-
ING LAST DAYS OF CAM-
PAIGN
PROFESSORS LOVE AND
RIGGS LEAD WORKERS

AUSTRO-ITALIAN DUEL
CONTINUES STUBBORN
CADOMA'S MEN RESIST ATTACK.
ERS AGGRESSIVELY ON 25
MILE FRONT.

SENIOR LITS NAME
OFFICE NOMINEES
Two Nominations Made For Each
Office At Meeting
Yesterday.
Senior literary students held their
first meetii yesterday afternoon in

"BEAT NEBRA5N
MEETING TO6N
YOST EXPECTS ONE OF HJ
GAMES OF SEASON 4
SATURDAY
FOUR FIRST CALIBI
,ATALKERSdONPRO(

On the twenty-five mile front run- the Economics building and nominat-

Students
and

Pnrchase $99,500 in Bonds
Faculty Subscriptions
Amount to $143,050

*
*
*
*
*
*

* * * * * * * * * * *
HOW MICHIGAN OVERSUB-
SCRIBED HER $200,000
LIBERTY LOAN
QUOTA

*
*
*
*
*

ALL MEN OF CLASS
DRAWN FIRST IN
ORDER

ONE TO
SERIAL

BE

The ten highest subscribers: *
Zeta Beta Tau ............ $6,500 *
Phi Kappa Psi ............ 6,370 *
Delta Gamma .............. 5,600 *
Newberry residence ........ 5,450 *
Senior engineers .........1.4,050 *
Trigon ................ .. 3,450 *
Theta Delta Chi............,050 *
Alpha Delta Phi. .. . .. .... .3,000 *
Beta Theta Pi ............ 2,850 *
Martha Cook dormitory ..'.. 2,600 *
Student subscriptions,
to date...............$ -99,500 *
Student subscriptions,
yesterday ...............12,650 *
Faculty total, to date.... 143,050 *
University total, to date. 242,550 *
* * * * * * * * * * * *

French forces in the Aisne region
continued to develop their successes
of Tuesday, when they made a rapid
advance over a front of about six miles,
capturing important German positions
and thousands of prisoners.
Following up the minor successes
Wednesday, the French again attacked
Thursday along the entire line forcing
the Germans to abandon Monkey Moun-
tain, east of Vauxaillon, the village and
forest of Pinon, the village of Pargly-
Filain,,and the extreme east of the line
at numerous fortified towns and other
points of vantage.
The latest drive of the French brings
them within sight of the important
railway junction of Laon, the objective
sought for, which now is a scant eight
miles away. Large quantities of war
stores were abandoned by the enemy
in their retreat and additional guns
and0prisoners were captured. The num-
ber of prisoners taken since the drive
began now exceeds 12,000, more than
200 of whom are officers.
An indication of the rapidity with
which the drive has been carried out
is the total number fo guns the Ger-
mans were forced to leave behind
them. These amount to 120, among
them several howitzers, not to mention
several hundred small calibre pieces
such as mine throwers and machine
guns.
RECEPTION FOR SENIOR GIRLS
TO BE HELD THIS AFTERNouN
Dean Myra B. Jordan's reception to
the senior girls will be held this aft-
ernoon at Barbour gymnasium. Those
in thereceiving line are: Dean Myra
B. Jordan, Mrs. # Mary B. Hutchins
Mrs. John R. Effinger, Miss Grace
Greenwood, Miss Agnes Wells, Miss
Sarah Hollands, Miss Alice Evans,
Miss Marian Wood, Miss Marion Daw-
ley, and Miss Louise Potter.
Anna Lloyd, '18, president of the
judiciary council, will decide upon the
committees to be elected. The re-
ception will begin at 3:30 o'clock.
U. S. Marines Possess Balboa's Sword
Washington, D. C., Oct. 25.-A
sword, broken, and rusty, but with the
hilt intact, said to have been bathed
in the waters of the Pacific by Balboa
centuries ago, is among the prized
relics of the United States Marine
Corps.
The weapon was found in the grip
of a dead revolutionary leader by a
Marine during the rebel uprising in
Nicaragua in 1912. It formerly re-
posed in a museum at Leon. At that
time the steel of the sword was in
fairly good condition and could be bent
double without breaking, after four

Washington, Oct. 25.-- New regula-
tions for applying the army draft were
virtually completed tonight at the of-
fice of the Provost Marshall General
and probably will be submitted to
President Wilson tomorrow for final
approval.
The president already has approved
the general planunder which all reg-
istered men not yet called will be
classified in five groups in accordance
with their availability for military ser-
vice.
Provost Marshall General Crowder
tonight cleared up the question as to
how the draft numbers now held by
the 9,000,000 uncalled registrants will
be applied to the new classification.
In each local district the key madef
up from the draft numbers in the or-
der of their drawing will be applied
to each class or group.
In other words, men of class one,
in which will be placed those of the
least value at home and with the
slighest obligations to dependents, will
be called in the order of their serial
numbers until the class is exhausted
just as though all other classes had
been exempted. When class one is ex-
hausted, the same process will be ap-
plied to class two and so" on down
to class five if it ever should become
necessary to carry it that far.
FIRST PUBLICATION DANCE
AT UNION NOVEMBER SECOND.
The first publications dance of the
year wile be given at the Union on
Nov. 2. The affair will be informal and
limited to those connected with stu-
dent publications..
Songs, band bounce features, and
the latest dancing steps will be intro-
duced. The chaperones of the evening
will be members of the Board of Con-
trol and their wives.
To Study President's War Message
Lansing, Mich., Oct. 25.-Study of
the president's war message is' urged
upon the schools of Michiga'n by Sup-
erintendent of Public Instruction Fred
L. Keeler, and knowledge of it is
necessary for teachers by reason of
the fact that five of the questions on
United States history at the examina-
tions to be held in April and August
of next year will be on the message.
Chaperones for Dance Announced
The Union will hold its regular Sat-
urday night dance tomorrow evening
at the Union building. Mr. and Mrs.
J. H, Cissle will chaperon. The com-
mitteemen are : Donald M. Springer,
'19E, chairman; M. Moore, '19, and L.
T gnbindla 1*A

(By Herbert G. Wilson)
The University of Michigan has
oversubscribed her $200,000 Liberty
loan quota by $42,550.
The entire loan purchase of faculty
and students combined, reached a total
of $242,550 last night. Faculty sub-
scriptions totaled $143,050. These fig-
ures include $5,000 of the bonds bought
by the Regents. Students in the Uni-
versity have rolled up a total of $99,-
500. The students bought $12,650
worth of the issue yesterday.
One of the least expected sources
of a large purchase of the loan was
among the girls of the Library staff..
The Library subscription was $3,500.
The two canvassers obtaining the
largest amount of bond sales are Prof.
Clyde Love of the mathematics de-
partment, and Prof. H. E. Riggs of the
engineering college. Professor Riggs
sold $15,000 worth while Professor
Love's quota totaled $42,000,, all
signed for by faculty members.
"We expect to give the country a
surprise," said Mr. Francis Bacon, '02,
executive chairman of the committee,"
the last day ok the campaign ought to
be a stimulus to those who bought
$50 bonds, and those who didn't buy
at all, to get that 'grand and glorious
feeling' of being a practical American
-delivering the goods. I have urged
every solicitor to bunch his efforts
in a final shove to put the Liberty
loaa over in Michigan, big."
"Why any member of the University
who is two-thirds American can re-
sist the temptation to buy a bond
when every real citizen has the fever,
is more than I can comprehend," de-
clared another committee member. "It
seems to me that the University can do
better than that, and I feel like get-
ting up on the top of some building
and telling it so."
All faculty members and students
who have bought bonds at the local
banks are expected to report the pur-
chase to the University headquarters'
at the Union, so that Michigan may get
her full credit.
Team members, captains, and solic-
itors are requested by the committee
in charge to turn in all their reports
to the executive department at ,once,
so that accurate tally may be kept
of the contestants in the last days of
the drive. Persons holding applica-
tions for bonds must turn them in not
(Continued on Page Six) J

ning from Monte Rombon to the Bain-
siza plateau, the battle'between the
Austro-German forces and the Italians
apparently is growing in intensity.
Though the Austro-German forces
are the aggressors the Italians are
stubbornly' resisting everywhere.
Although the German war office
asserts that gains have been- made
at various .points along the line, the
Italian official communication does
not concede any losses except on the
east bank of the Isonzo plateau. To
the contrary, this communication as-
serts that on the Bainsizza plateau,
where the Germans had announced
successes, and on the west slope of
Monte San Gabriele, enemy attacks
were repulsed and that the Italians
even took several hundred prisoners.
Not alone does the German war of-
flee claim that the Italian line bar-
ring the way to the Flitsch basin and
to Tolmino was over-run, and that
positions were captured on the Bain-
sizza plateau, but that large quanti-
ties of booty were taken by the Aus-
tro-Germans and that more than 10-
000 prisoners fell into their hands, in-
cluding divisional and brigade staffs.
FIRST STINT OF
LOAN IS REACHED
Treasury Estimates Total Subsrip.
tions at $,200,000,000
Mark
Washington, Oct. 25.-Liberty loan
totals passed the three million dol-
lar mark today and headed for the five
billion dollar maximum with every
indication that by contribution of the
relentless campaign, the latter figures
would be reached when the books
closed Saturday.
Although unoffical estimates from
the 12 federal reserves do not total
the figure, officials tonight expressed
the conviction that subscriptions were
passed the 3,500,000,000 mark.
"Victory for the second Liberty loan
is in sight," Secretary McAdoo an-
nounced tonight upon his return
home from a trans-continental tour in
behalf of the loan, "but it has not yet
been achieved."
Compiled from estimates submitted
by local committees and federal re-
serve bank headquarters, the total
unofficial estimate of subscriptions as
announced tonight by the treasury was
$3,200,000,000. This sum is regarded
by many officials as ultra-conserva-
tive.
12 NAMES ADDED
TO GRADE A LIST
Seniors Have Majority of New Addi-
tions; Seven Women and
Five Men.

ed the following for class officers:
President, James Schermerhorn, Jr.,
and Albert E. Horne, Jr.; vice-presi-
dent, Lois E. May and Mildred C.
Mighell; secretary, Louise A. Irish and
Marie C. Macaulay; treasurer, Charles
F. Boos and Herbert W. Giessing; stu-
dent councilmen, Fred W. Sullivan,
Gordon C. Mack, Philip Pack, and Ber-
nard G. Krause.
Arthur G. Ipple was elected orator-
ical delegate and J. B. Ded was chos-
en student councilman for one semes-
ter. Two student councilmen for the
entire year will be elected from the
four nominees.
Care cu d Sorrow
Vanish Tomorrow
Gargoyle Press Agent Tells Joys of
October Number to Daily
Reporter
Mars the majestic, magnificent,
mighty stalks through its pages and
cries "Hoighty-toighty"-rattles his
coat o'mail, clashes the scutum, as for
the Huns, why he swears that he'll
shoot 'em.
Aesthetic Athena with wisdom and
wit, theGargoyle enlivens in "doing
her bit." There are essays and epi-
grams, mild or most furious, amusing
the idle or aiding the curious.
"Brighter and snappier than ever be-
fore" (on sale tomorrow at any book
store). "Bigger, and better we're read
ready to greet you" (Boys on the street
will be happy to meet you.)
Smiles for the faculty, balm for the
lover, said to benifty from cover to
cover. The Gargoyleers vow it'll bring
back the summer. If true, this month's
issue is surely a hummer.
UNION PLANS FOR EXCURSION
RATES TO NORTHWESTERN'l
Excursion tickets to Evanston for
the Michigan-Northwestern football
game will be placed on sale at the Un-
ion building, if the plans of the Union
officials materialize. Negotiations are
now being carried on with the rail-
road company, and some definite an-
nouncement will 'probably be made
within the next few days. The price
of the tickets and the date of their
sale will be published as soon as ar-
rangements have been completed.
MORTARBOARD BEGINS FINAL
DRIVE ON WOMEN STUDENTS
Mortarboard, honorary society for
senior girls, has undertaken a final
and exhaustive drive among the wom-
en.
Under the leadership of Mildred
Mighell, '18, every member of the so-
ciety is captaining a team of eight
workers, whose activities are expected
to reach every woman in this Univer-
sity before tomorrow morning.

"Vie"
L.

"Beat Nebraska and win '
will be the feature of tgnig
meeting at 7:15 o'clock in Iili
ium. This quotation is tak
Coach Yost's statement that
Saturday means success for
of the season. "To do this
have to give everything we
added.
Tonight the students will ha
portunity to do their part, a
thing but a packed house wt
that the student body is not
lastic over the game upon wh
ball critics have been specul
length for some time.
Four unusually good speak
been secured according to the
tee in charge. "Vic" Patten
of Lansing, former end and ha
of Yost's best, is one of the foi
played in '09 and '10' and
for two years, after his gra
Besides being rated as a I
speaker, he is considered as s<
of a football authority.
"Hal" Smith, for two years
of Michigan's track team and
man that ever held this posi
two seasons is the second
Smith was cheerleader as w
track man. His reputation a
speaker is unequalled.
H. C. L. Jackson, ex-'18, w
be present 'according to 'a li
ceived yesterday. Jackson wa
been this year's managing e
The Michigan Daily, but was
during the summer and is now
Custer. He is well known on 1
pus.
Prof. I. Leo Sharfman of t
omics department, will be th
speaker. Whether or not F
Sharfman will speak upon the
ics of football is not known.
Robt. T. McDonald 118, m
editor of The Daily, will act a
man of the meeting.
Last but not least the band
present and will start and fi
program in its own inimita
as has been the custom in'the
Seating arrangements and a
will be the same as last week
ing, but the hour of starting
15 minutes earlier. The first fl
be for men only, but all men
to sit on this floor must prese
athletio boos at the door. 7I
balcony will be for women on.
third balcony will be open to I
eral public.
"Skee" Poleski and "Bud"
son will lead cheers and a co:
song leader will be present.
The committee which has 'bee
ing at top speed since Monday
to swing the meeting consists
Schacht, '18E, chairman; C. A
'18E, and S. S. Atwood, '18E
dent of the Student council.
HAROLD TITUS WILL SPEA
JOURNALISM STUDENTS M
It was erroneously annoui
yesterday's Daily that Harol
magazine writer of prominen
has recently completed the cc
Army stores, would speak a
today in room 102, West Hal
Mr. Titus will address stad
journalism at 10:30 Mnday,
29. His subject will be,
WVVh I Had Known Uoon I

PattengMi, "Hal" Sm
Jackson, and Prof SJ
WiU Instill Pep

Thirty-four students received "A"
grade work last semester instead of
22 as announced in Wednesday's is-
sue. Charles R. Illick, '18M, and Rog-
er N. Walker, '19M, should not have
been listed with the "A" grade stu-
dents.
Following is the list of "A" grade
students who were omitted in the first
list. L. A. Hoag, '18M; L. C. Todd,
'18M; Dorothy Avery, '20; Margaret
Bissell, '20; Priscilla Butler, '18; An-
its Kelley, '17; Bernice. Krueger, '17;
Scott E. Lamb, '17; Albertine Loomis,
'17; Floyd A. Rowe, Sp.; Lewis Rams-
dell, '17; Margaret Reynolds, '17;
and Helen Krueger, '17.

Everything Ready for Arcade Festa
Elaborate preparations have been
made for the festival to be held at
Nickels arcade tonight and tomorrow
night. Gypsy fortune tellers and van-
deville artists will be features of the
occasion. Sandwiches and pumpkin
pie will be served from the empty.
booths on either side. "Ike" Fisher's
orchestra will furnish music for danc-
ing on the second floor of the Arcade.
The proceeds of the festival will be
given to help the Old Ladies' home.

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