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October 25, 1917 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-10-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


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VICE HELPS
E FOODSTUFFS

TA SHOWS MANY COMMON VEG-
ETABLES MAY DISPLACE
SCARCER ARTICLES
dichigan students, professors and
alth officials are endeavoring to as-
t in the food conservation move-
at. The University health service
e recently given out the following
a that should. assist those who care
properly regulate the amount or the
ection of their food.
Lverage proper weights vary for
n and women. For men, a height of
6 feet should mean a weight of 126
ands; five feet two inches, 130
inds; five feet fpur inches, 136
jndo; five feet six inches, 144
inds; five feet eight inches, 152
ands; five feet 10 inphes,161 pounds,
d sIx feet, 172 pounds.-
['he proper weight for women four
t eight inches should be 112 pounds;
itr -feet 10 inches, 116 pounds; five
t, 120 pounds; five feet two inches,
1 pounds; five feet four inches, 131
unds; five feet six inches, 138
inds; five feet eight inches, 146
.nds; five feet 10 inches, 154 pounds,
: six feet, 161 pounds. If a student's
liht1 does not agree with this table
should eat more.
6'or a student's own good he may
well eat one large, well cooked
tato as a small piece of fat pork.
the following table be put into
actice, which gives the same amount
food value in the quantities given,
d their exchange value, a large sav-
g will be made in conserving our
>d stuffs, says the health service.
Food Tables
Vegetables and fruit: Shelled beans,
erage side dish; beets, three serv-
ss; carrots, two servings; cooked
rn, one side dish; parsnips, one
d one-half servings; peas, cooked,
e average serving; potatoes, one
ge; potato chips, one-half serving;
eet potatoes, one-half average size;
oked spinach, two servings; succo-
ih, ordinary serving; tomatoes, four
erage size; turnips, two farg serv-
;s; apples, two; apple sauce, ordin-
Y serving; apricot, large serving;
nana, one large; grape juice, small
ass; orange, one very large; peach-
,nine; pears, one large, prunes
ree.
Meats: Beef, mutton and lean pork,
rge serving; fat pork, small serv-
Baked goods: Cake, one-half ordin-
y piece; pie, one-half ordinary piece;
.dding, small serving; white bread,
The C'orset
Is the Foundation
Your college outfit starts
with a

ordinary thick slice; graham bread,
ordinary thick slice; corn bread, or-
dinary serving..
Miscellaneous: Corn flakes, cereal,'
dishful; graham crackers, three; mac-
aroni, ordinary serving; oatmeal, one
and one-half servings; boiled rice,,
ordinary cereal dish; shredded wheat,
one biscuit; butter, ordinary pat or
ball; milk, small glass; cheese, one
and one-half cibic inches; honey,
four teaspoonful, sugar, three tea-
spoonsful; peanuts, thirteen double
nuts; walnuts, about six, and eggs,
one large.
NEW MEMBERS SOUGHT
FOR COMEDY CLUB PLAY
"MISS HOBBS," POSTPONED LAST
SPRING TO BE PRESENTED
SOON. TRYOUTS SATURDAY.
Jerome K. Jerome's play, "Miss
Hobbs," which the Comedy., club was
unable to stage last spring, will be
presented sometime this fall, accord-
to a recent announcement.
Vacancies left in the cast, it is ex-
pected, will be filled in the try-
outs this week, which are scheduled
for Saturday from 9 to 12 o'clock, at
Newberry hall.
Students who have been one semes-
ter in the University are eligible to
membership. Freshmen are not per-
mitted to take part in any of the
club's activities.

MONEY MUST COME IF
HUN "KULTUR" IS DOWNED
NECESSARY TO FREE OURSELVES
FROM OUR NATIONAL
SOFTNESS.

(By George F. Hurley, '18L.)
We as a nation are engaged in a
death struggle with a foe that neither
knows nor practices the principles of
humanity. Hardened by privation,
brazen in its self-confessed mendac-
ity, and infurated by a powerful and
stubborn opposition to its lustful
craze for power; they do not expect
nor intend to give any quarter.
We face such a foe, whose every
human element, and whose entire ec-
onomic resource is centered in this
conflict, with a citizenry steeped in a
philosophy of individualism that bor-
ders on selfishness, a philosophy that
preaches that the individual is above
all, and that democracy exists to serve
him. . Such a philosophy breaks down
when pitted against a highly concen-
trated autocracy. Great Britain does
not talk in terms of the individual┬░
today as she did four years ago. Let
us profit by her experience.
National Life Soft.
Our life as a nation has been so
soft, and prosperous, and peaceful.
We have taken everything in so ef-
fortless a manner that we are forget-
ful that what we enjoy has to be paid
for with a price, and that to pay that
price is our bounden duty. We have
incurred an obligation which, if we
are at all honorable, we will endea-
vor to discharge.
We who enjoy the privilege of an
education at the hands of the state
are heavily obligated to it, and we are
bound to redeem this obligation, by
service to the State when oportunity
presents. To feel the responsibility of
paying this great debt is the true es-
sence of citizenship.
Too many of us are veritable spong-
es, sucking in all we can get, and hold-
ing it,-until the strong hand of the
law, under pressure of necessity,'
squeezes out of some of our surplus,
and then we yell with pain. If we be-
lieve that the purpose of education
is to make us first class sponges-
then we deserve to be squeezed, and
squeezed hard. To believe such is to
proclaim that we are devoid of all
loyalty to our fellow men and the
country thatis their composite self,-
that we are citizens only to exploit
our country .

Spicy News From
Other Universities

Students of Columbia university will
cast their votes for the next mayor of
New York. A straw vote is to be held
under supervision of the Specta-
tor. Both men and women will vote.
The coal supply of Ohio state uni-
versity is not yet on a secure basis.
Only one carload of fuel has been re-
ceived by the university and conse-
quently the danger of a tieup from
a cold spell is still imminent.
Nine machines from the aviators'
training camp at Dayton visited Ohio
State university lately. The trip was
a surprise to the residents of Colum-
bus, but a large crowd was at the
field before the last of the planes land-
ed. The planes traveled in military
formation, with two men to each ma-
chine. The entire trip was accom-
plished without any serious accident.
A cafeteria has been established
in conjunction with Indiana universi-
ty. The creation of a homelike atmos-
phere with the serving of meals that
will tempt the most jaded appetite at
a price that will be an inducement for
everyone to put on weight, is said to
be the aim d~ this new institution.
One of the managers is quoted as say-
ing, "If, as Napoleon said, an army
fights on its stomach, it is equally
true that a student studies in the
same way. The student who has in-
sufficient or improper food will not
get on in his work. "
Outdoor exercise woll take the place
of the gym work for women of the
University of Kansas. Gymnastic
drills based on the value of military
training will be given. The univer-
You can get those Neolin Soles
put on at Paul's Place. 611 E. Wil-
liam while you wait.-Adv.

sities of Misouri and Nebraska are
following this plan.
Abolition of formals during the per-
iod of the war is advised by Dr.
Strong, Chancellor of the University
of Kansas. He urges that if formals
are not entirely done away with, at
least their expense should be greatly
reduced, so that the price of admission
will be as low as possible.
MICHIGAN DELEGATES ATTEND
"Y" BUILDING DEDICATION
Delegates from Michigan to the war
service conference at Battle Greek'had
an opportunity to visit Camp Custer
and to attend the dedication services
of the new army Y. M. C. A. headquar-
ters.
Michigan sent a large delegation of
men and women to the conference.
Helen Bourke, '18, -president'of the Y.
W. C. A., states that there were 15
University girls and 10 faculty wom-
en at the meeting. Dr. John R. Mott,
who has just returned from Europe,
was the principal speaker.
George A. Blewitt, a freshman at
the University of Claifornia, died yes-
terday of injuries received in a foot-
ball game on Saturday.
RAE THEATRE
EMMY WEHLAN, Star of "The
Slacker" in "Trail of the Shadow"
IRENE CASTLE in "PATRIA"
HATTERS TO COLLEGE MEN
We make and retail hats. . Make' Hats-to-
Order and do all kinds of hat work such as
reblocking, new bands. etc. We also sell and
reblock Army.fHats.
Hats shaped totfit the head free of charge
when bought of us.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 Packard St.. next to the Delta.
Cor. 'State and Packard.
THE RIGHT PLACE TO BUY A HAT
Telephone 1792

Pop.Mat.Wd. Wk. Oct.22
Best Seats ;1 A R Ngt
Sat. Mat. . .0c tou$2.00
25C to $150 DETROWLI I T O GEI
S WILLIAM HODGE In
"A CURE FOR CURABLES"
A New Four Act Comedy Drama
ARCADE
Thurs-z5-Barbara Castreton and an all.
star cast in "On Trial," and Drew i
Comedy, "Music Hath Charms."
Fri-26-AlicetJoyce and Harry Morey in
"Within the Law." 8 Parts.
Sat-27-Earle Williams in "Tranagres.
sion," and Comedy.
Mon.-29-Harold Lockwood in "Paradise
Garden" and Drew Comedy "The Pat-
riot"
=WUerth They.tre
BOOKINGS FOR OCTOBER
Prices: 15 Cents -
SMatinees 2, 3:30. Nights 6:30, 8, 9.30
= SaturdaysSundays-Continuous
= Thur-Fri-25-26-Geo. Beban in "Lost in
= Transit." Also Keystone Comedy.
Sat-27-Jackie Saunders in "Betty Be
Good." Also Serial, "Neglected
- Wife," No. 8.
C Sun-Mon-28-29-Mary Pickford in "Re-
C becca of Sunnybrook Farm," Also=
.. Holmes Travels and Victor Moore
Comedy. =
Tues-Wed-3o-3x-Taylor Holmes in "Efi-
ciency Fdgar's Courtship." Also a
Reel Comedy, "Day and Night."
OrpheumTheatre
BOOKINGS FOR OCTOBER
Prices: zoc unless otherwise specified
Matinees , 3:30. Nights 6:so, 8, 9: s o
Saturdays-Sundays-Continuous "
Thurs-25-Dorotha Dalton in "Ten of
Diamonds." Also Triangle Comedy
= and Ford. S
Fri-26-Louisa Glaum in "The Idola-
= ters." Also Triangle Comedy and
Ford. d
Sat-27-Baby M. Osborne in "Fear and
Smile." Also Mutual Comedy and
= Travels.-
= Sun-28-Shirley Mason in "The Awak-
ening of Ruth." Also "Do Children
= Count?"
Mon-29-Miss Juliette DA rin "The
= Rainbow Girl.,' Also Serial, .Lost
Express," No. 4.
Tues-o-Violet McMillan in "The Girl
Who Won Out." Also Weekly and
Comedy.

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AT THE THEATERS'
YOU CAN GO TO-~-
"A Cure for Curables," at the
Garrick.a

TODAY

* Whitney-"The Price She Paid."
* Majestic--"The Bridal Twirl."

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a Orpheum- Dorothy Dalton in
"Ten of Diamonds." Also Tri-
angle Comedy and Ford.-
Wuerth--Geo. Beban in "Lost in
Transit,' Also Keystone Comedy.
Arcade-Barbara Castleton in
"On Trial."

I BUTTERFIELD' S BEST I

AJ

S

Rae-Emmy Wehkan
Trail of the Shadow."
ria.'

in "The
8th "Pat-

*
*

Where Everybody Goes

* * * * * * 0 * * * 0 0 S* $

AT THE MAJESTIC.

( ej

The coming of Boyle Woolfolk's'
Musical Comedy will give the local
patrons of the game another oppor-
tunity to improve acquaintance with
the inimitable Guy Voyer and his as-
sistants in mirth and song. Their new
production, The Bridal Twirl, will be
their initial offering. It is a tuneful
melange of scenic splendor, offers a
bevy of beautiful girls garbed accord-
ing to the latest dictates of Dame
Fashion, and is altogether one of the
most spirited vehicles in which this
company has appeared.
There is f profusion of jingling mel-
ody, of the whistling kind, and smiles
ranging from the tiny crinkling of the
lips to the full-blown guffaw of up-
roarious laughter. There is never a
let-up when things have started-
from the curtaIn's rise there is some-
thing doing in some interesting or
amusing way.
The gowns that are worn by the
pretty girls in this company are a rev-
elation to feminity.
WOMAN'S LEAGUE POSTPONED
PARTY WILL BE HELD TODAY
The postponed membership party of
the Woman's league will be held from
3:30 to 5:30 o'clock this afternoon in
Barbo'ur .gymnasium.
For this first big league party of the
year, Wyvern, junior girls' honorary
society, has provided an original play.
Besides this entertainment, dancing
will add to the afternoon's enjoyment.
"Y" TO RAISE $35,000,000
FOR WORK AMONG SOLDIERS
The Y. M. C. A. will open a national
campaign Nov. 11 to raise $35,000,000
for association work among the sol-
diers. $11,500,000.00 of this fund will
be spent at training camps in this
country, a large part of the balance
will be used among the American sol-
diers in France.
Russian and Italian officials have
asked that the asociation send repre-
sentatives to their countries to help
improve the morale of their armies.

Must Give.
Fighting the foe that we are, and
as unprepared as we are to do it, the
greatest opportunity that we ever will
have to settle our debts with democ-
racy presents itself. If we cannot
fight, then we can give of that which
under a beneficient political spstem
we have been able to enjoy. Either
method of settling with our country
entails sacrifice, and both go to our
credit toward striking a balance in our
account with our republic. We cannot
be selfish and be patriotic at the same
time. To be the former, is to blind
ourselves to our duty, and that is a
form of treason which, while not pun-
ishable with death, merits, and will
surely receive, the scornful treatment
that it deserves.
All of us, rich and poor, are in-
debted to this democracy of ours. We
owe more than we can pay, and if we
have any respect for our manhood, and
womanhood, we will at least urge up-
on our generous and patient creditor,
our country, a substantial percentage
of our obligation in the shape of sub-
scriptions to the Liberty Loan, to
serve her, andthrough her, our fel-
lows, in our common necessities. We
cannot be true citizens and be blind
to our duty,-only ingrates turn deaf
ears to the call of that great democ-
racy that represents us all, is us all.
With the Hun thundering at the gates
of civilization, if we prize what we
have, let us cast aside our petty indi-
vidual comforts and rise as one to re-
pel him ere he spread ruin and ter-
ror among us.
FEW BOOKS HANDED IN AT
LIBRARY FOR SOLDIER CAMPS
Although the library is still caling
for more books for . the soldiers'
camps, very few have been brought
within the last two weeks. Books con-
tributed have been mostly fiction, but
a few French text-books have also
been brought in. No technical works
have been received for some time.
Tryouts For Varsity Debate To Meet.
Law students who intend to' try out
for the Varsity debate will meet in
Webster hall Thursday, Oct. 25, at
7.00 P. M.
You can get those Neolin Soles put
on at Paul's Place, 611 E. William,
Phone 237.-Adv.

3 DAYS COMMENCING WITH

Special

Extra

Matinee
THURSDAY. OCT. 25'
3 O'clock

I

d
,

BOYLE WOLFOLKIS

Musical Comedly Co.'

w
2
0

with

GVY VOYER

Wi
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FI
4
Om

sand

-030-w

People

-30

I

Your figure will be graceful,
and you will have distinct
style, irrespective of simplicity
in dress, and your lhealth as-
sured.
Moreover, a Redfern
Model is so ideally com--
fortable, fitting so natur-
ally that its wearer may
do any athletic stunt as
easily as she dances,
rides or walks, in her
corset.
Be sure to have your Redfern
Corset properly fitted before
you choose your suits and
frocks-then their correct
appearance is assured.

Smart and Talented
Pretty Girl Chorus

'I

-1000 L~AUGHS-

Swamger Cost umes-Jolly Music-Elaborate Effects
This is the Bi Success of Last Season
Hurry-wteserve Seats NowHurry

Matinees 3; lOc-20c

Nights 7:30, 9:00; 20c, 25c, 30c

MACK & CO.

SUNDAY
ONLY

MAR Y PICKFORD
"The Liftle American"

Her
Greatest

I

SITS A BUTTERFIELD SHOW LETS

I.

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