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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 02, 1917 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-10-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY,

i

THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY,

I'

Walk-Over

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Our

"Devon"

Model

A regular thorougbred
Comes also in Brown
Russia, Koko Brown
Siberian Calf

n Cordovan

Style 939

Price $9.00

$7.00 to $9.00

Walk-Over Boot Shop
115 S. Main Street

Ii

Newcomb-Endicott
Company

Detroit,

Michigan

1868

FOUNDED 18681

U

300D HOME BOARD

Three Meals per day . $5.00
Two Meals per day . . $4.00

Ancient Battle
Gets Good Start
Wensel Cunning of Gargoyle Is Ex-
posed by Accurate Daily
Man
It realy wasn't his fault. He was
merely the latest addition to the staff
of The Michigan Daily, and as yet had
no very complete understanding of the
dignity of his office as news gatherer-
at-large. Still it. was with a feeling of
joy not unmingled with fear that he
stepped boldly forth to fulfill his first
assignment.
He had merely to mount the stairs
and knock timidly upon the door of
the Gargoyle's new office.
A gruff, "Well, come in," was the
response. For a moment he hesitated.
He had heard whispers of the funny
publication even in his up-state high
school, and it was not without em-
barrassment that he softly turned the
knob to enter the editorial sanctum.
The big room was empty save for a
little sandy-haired fellow who sat at1
a desk many sizes too big for him
and pounded away on a typewriter like
a Kansas cyclone gone mad.
"If-if you please, sir, I'm from The
Daily and I'd like to find out some-
thing about the Gargoyle."
The clicking stopped. The typist
whirled in his chair. "Here," he said,
"take this and this and this and this."
The cub ducked, but "this" was only
a blank sheet of regulation 9x12 copy
paper
The reporter then vrote busily for
an hour and thirteen minutes while
all the coming glories of the humor
magazine were unfolded to him. His
fingers ached and his ears tingled with
"Increased size-new arrangement-
triple columns-special departments-
not limited to humorous features-best
talent on the campus will contribute
-faculty invited-nothing but the
snappiest and best in art-cleverness
the watchword-give the boys in the
trenches the essence of the old Michi-
gan spirit-monthly resume of all
that's going on-"
The cub tottered down the stairs
with his copy. He was met by the as-
signment editor who took the sheets
from his faltering hands. "What's
this?" he roared, "of all the bone-.
Look here, you! Don't you know this
is the kind of stuff that the business
side gets good money for? Nix on this
press-agenting. Now get busy and
gimme a stickful.NWait-I'll write it
myself., 'First number of the Gargoyle,
said to be brighter and snappier than
ever, will go on sale about October
24.' D'ye get me, Kid? I say, d'ye get
me?"
And thus was the first inkling of the
aged-old Daily-Gargoyle fight borne
upon the cub as sadly he started for
the basement, murmuring as he went:
"Of all the sad words of tongue or
pen-
I'll never get stuffed with that line
again."
AT THE WHITNEY
Klaw and Erlanger's successful mu-
sical comedy, "Miss Springtime," with
Frank McIntyre as comedian, comes
to the Whitney Monday, Oct. 8, with a
cast of 75 and an all-season record in
New York and Boston. The story is
the work of Guy Bolton, the former
architect, and turns on the romance of
a girl called Rosika in the mythical
village of Pilota, where love, journal-
ism, and an "Old Home Week" cele-
bration form a framework for much
spirited fun, song, and dance.

AT THE MAJESTIC
The bill at the Majestic this week is
headed by McConnell and Simpson,
veteran farceurs, who are presenting
a skit called "At Home" as a travesty
on the domestic existence of the pair
in the well-known city f Kansas City.

Today
7:30 o'clock-Open house at Luther
chapel, Washington street.
7:30 o'clock-Open house at Meth-
odist shurch, State street.
U-Notices
"Varsity band tryouts will be held
at 7 o'clock tonight in University
Hall.
Tryouts for the Student Directory
are requested to report to Gordon
Mack at 7 o'clock tonight at the Ann
Arbor Press building.
The gymansium offices will be open
,from 10 to 12 o'clock and from 2 to 5
o'clock daily for tht securing of
locker tickets and the making of
examination appointments.
Sophomores in good standing will
be admitted to Sociology 19.
Candiates for the cross-country
,eam are requested to report from 4
to 6 o'clock this afternoon on Ferry
field.
Freshmen architects are asked to
notice that they must not register in
the Engineering school. The schools
are separate.
The history department wishes to'
announce the following courses omit-
ted from the annual announcement of
the literary college.
History 37-History of the United
States during the Civil war and re-
construction. Given by Professor Wal-
iace 1[on., Wed., and Fri., at 11 o'clock
in room 203 Tappan Hall.
History 38b- The United States
during Jefferson's admiistrations.
Given by Professor Wallace Mon.,
Wed., and Fri., at 2 o'clock.
History 41b-Seminary dealing with
history of the eastern group of south-
ern states. Given by Professor Wal-
lace Wed. .-6, for two hours credit in
the east seminary room.
LANE HALL OPEN HOUSE
TAES PLACE TONIGHT
(oCntinued from Page One)
chair; Harry Meyer, the Congrega-
tional religious educational director;
Lionel Crocker, '18L, in charge of the
Baptist student work; Leonard A. Bar-
rett, pastor of the first Presbyterian
church, and C. L. Kaufman of the
Jewish Student society, all have of-
fices in this building and are ready
and glad to confer with anyone de-
siring advice.
Book Exchange to Be Continued
As has been the custom during the
past years the "Y" will conduct a
book exchange and any person who
wishes to sell any of their old books
is requested to mars the price desired
upon the book and turn it over to the
"Y" authorities who will sell it. This
feature of the "Y" service has been
particularly successful during the past
and has two very good results, both
of which are worthy of support. The
first is that it provides booksdcheaper
than new books for needy students,
the second is that it provides a way
for needy students to turn books which
are useless to them into cash.
1917-18 MUSICAL CLUBS'
PROSPECTS LOOK BETTER
Prospects for the 1917-18 musial
clubs although unpromising last
spring, seem better this fall, with
Horace Davis, '17, and Robert Dieterle,
'18, forming a nucleus for the organ-
ization.
The initial tryouts will start on
Monday and Tuesday of next week, the
time and place to be announced later.
Prof. Theodore Harrison is optimistic
about the final organization of the
club and although the trip, the fea-
ture of former years, is still uncer-

tain, it is expected that the personnel
will be as large as ever.
Subscribe for the Michigan Daily.

Leading Merchant Tailors

STATE STREET

WHAT'S GOING ON

With thirty years' experience of catering to an exacting
tailoring trade we are better prepared than ever to fully main-
tain the standard by which we have always been recognized.
We solicit your custom on the basis of a record of good
service to an exacting trade for a long period of years, and of
our undertaking to provide you with suits and overcoats of
guaranteed quality and workmanship.

Choice C ut Flowers and Plants

A Specialty

Miade

J Corsage

Vouq

I

G. H. Wild Company

1002 S.
Cousins & Hall UNIV..AVE.
7lembers of the Florists Telegraph Debery Association

0

G H. Wild
Company

I

im

A. M.

11:30 A. M-1 P. M.

5:30-7 P. M.

OSWORTH INN 119 N. THAYER
Real Custom Tailoring
Featuring advance models of our own design

Riding Breeches

Golf Suits

CAPPER

& CAPPER

Neckwear and Furnishings
D. E. GRENNAN
E. Liberty at 606

_ -
a -
a -
_ a
- a
- a
a -
a WIS
I- If you wish to
buy better shoes
Sfor less money
Syou can find
them at :::"
aa
- a
a -
a a
a
a _
HARBE L'EVY'SI
a a
* STAR :SHOE STORE 2
-20 N. '~ MAIN ST-
:. OPPOSITE POSTOFFICE
We are decorating some of the best
homes in the city. Call 237. C. H.
Major & Co.-Adv.

I i

CURTIS
Hand Built
TIRES
Plain and Non-skid Tread
Built By
VULCANIZED
PRODUCTS
CO.
Muskegon, Mich.
U. of M. RESTAURANT
Quick, Polite
SERVICE

STUDENT

Special Meals at all Hours

Loose-Leaf

Near to everyone
62o E. LIBURTY

NOTE BOOKS

We are making special close-out prices on Students'
oks. We can furnish these books in all Binding.
DRAWING SETS
' The drawing sets in Gregory, Mayer & Thom
Co. stock are standard and the very best made.
The instruments are of best quality, and come
9 in neat serviceable leather cases that may be
folded and slipped into the pocket.

Ring

Ee

The Kemfp Music Studio:
Organ, Voice Culture. 312 S.
St. Phone 212-J.-Adv.

Piano,
Division

Prices Range from $5.00 Up,

after ,you' enroll-
you will need many
supplies
We have Drawing
Sets, T-Squares,
Slide Rules, and
everything you needs

I-

~

mA

TRANSITS, LEVELS,
ALL SUPPLIES FOR THE

TAPES
ENGINEERS

Freshmen, Greetings:

I

Leather Portfolios for Carrying Papers, Fountain Pens,
Note Paper
It will pay you to get in touch with us
rE DO STEEL & COPPER PLATE ENGRAVING

We welcome you to our midst. We have seen many
of you come and go. We have been here 12 long
years serving Michigan Men and Women. Several
others have tried to serve you in the same capacity
but most have failed. While they have made failures,
we have made successes, and now as we are entering
another school year, we want you, Mr. Freshman to
get started RIGHT. We want you to know our busi-
ness-our policy, our value to you as a student and in
after years we want you to realize now what Pictures
of College days meant to every student-what a
knowledge of Photography means to a man through
life. Sit down and think it over and resolve to start
NOW to keep a4 collection. Start now to find by in-
quiry or by personal observation who should do your
Kodak finishing-who has the Kodak and Finishing
business of this new- home of yours.
We invite you to come in and get acquainted with
the biggest and busiest Exclusive. Kodak Shop in
Michigan-and remember that we guarantee every

job-or no pay.
There is only one real Kodak Shon in Ann Arbor
and that is LYNDON'S-719 N. University Ave., 2
doors from the Hill Auditorium, at the sign of the
Kodak-right on the Campus-just north of the Law
Building.
(Est. 1905, growing ever since)
Two Doors from the Arcade Theatre
P. S.-Open every evening until 9 o'clock-but you
can drop your film after hours in the chute and
well take care of it next day
Here's some good news:-We have 9000 Eastman
Kodaks to rent for only 10c per day. Also some bar-
gains in slightly used Kodaks as well as all the new
ones-in stock. Our films are fresh, they don't get
stale 'round here.
See our line of albums.
Come in and get acquainted. I'll have some Rush
and Football Pictures for you roon.

I

Lits, Laws, Medics
and all others will
find just what
they want
here
WE ARE THE ONLY
TU DENTS
UPPLY
STORE V
11-11S.UIEST AV

I

tr6oRYAY Ras. ITOM
RS, ENGRAVERS, LITHOGRAPHERS, LOOSE LEAF
DEVICES, BLANK BOOKS, STATIONERY and
OFFICE FURNITURE

I

I

19-25 Cadillac Square

DETROIT, MICH.

Lyndon,

i 32,11
1 k2M1 iF e-sc' '[LA: AIY::w d ' ::!} T'i$':2. 2-Sr 1G4+ "ii;" ,=7th

I

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I

I

£~U~'.Cr)for 'r idv ~mDd

f~a:'l:' ec,'-..,t ::,,~it -^:;Y, ti '.r .J.- -r l>, s -.: .. - - , - ~x - _ =, +h ~ f '... Y- . A - "7d .:E

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