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October 21, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-10-21

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4ICHIGAN EXPECTS EVERY MAN TO E

J k

11

DUT

I

Air
:43 at

ASSOCIATI
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT
SERVICE

L Ui1LE
[GiT

No. 18.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 1917.

PRICE THREE CEN'

INMACHINERY OF
SELECTIVE DRAFT
JAN WILL DO AWAY WITH CO-L
PLICATIONS OF OLD
SYSTEM
ETAILS OF SCHEME
BEING WORKED OUT
,lieved That Next Call to Colors
Will Not Come Before First
of Year
Washington, Oct. 20.-A sweeping
ange in the machinery of the selec-
re draft based on division of the
00,000 remaining registrants into
e classes in order of their eligib-
ty for military service, was an-
rinced today by Provost Marshal
neral Crowder.
Details of the plan, which have been
proved by President Wilson, are not
iclosed. It is believed it will do
ay with all the complicated ma-
inery of the first army call.
Plan Worked Out
The plan was worked out at con-
rences with local and district board
icials. Its chief features are that
ery registered man will know his
act position and be able to arrange
$ affairs. -
No man necessary in any industry or
eded at home to support his family
.11 be called to the colors unless the
litary situation is desperate. De-
Lled regulations to govern the new
stem are being made for distribu-
5n.
Issues Formal Statement
General Crowder has issued a for-
a statement in ":er that the
ards may familiar e themselves
th the new regulations. As the next
11 to the colors is to be made under
e new plan, it is believed that the
cond call will not come before the
st of the yea.'. s
Announces Plans
Following is the announcement of
ovost Marshal General Crowder:
"With the completion of the draft
the first army of 687,000 men, a
m system will be installed for the
eation of the succeeding army.
"Along with the reduction of labor,
ere will be provided a system which
di classify each one of the nine mil-
m men who have not been inducted
to military service. Each man will
given his place in the kiational
hene of defense. .
"The method of obtaining this in-
rmation is through a questionnaire.
is document will be mailed to every
an not yet in service, seven days be-
g given to complete and return
me.
"The local boards will examine each
Ltement and assign each man to his
as.
'The new system fixes a man's class
A calls him in his proper turn."
GAME CONSUMERS FOR PRESENT
kY SUGAR SHORTAGE IN NORTH
Washington, Oct. 20.-Blame for the
wsent day sugar shortage north of
vannah and east of Pittsburg is
ced on consumers and on manu-
Aurers of candies by the food ad-
nistration.
En a statement today, the food ad-
nistration said that if its request

r the curtailment of the use of sugar
d been heeded, present conditions
uld not exist and it again warned
e people to economize.
Columbia Protests Hun's Warfare
Washington, Oct. 20.-The Colomb-
L senate has ' passed - a resolution
ainst Germany's ruthless submarine
Lrfare, the state department was ad-
ed today. Officials regard the action
the Colombian senate as signifying
e development of a better feeling
' this country and the Allies.
W Finds Guilty in Indian Revolt
Chicago, Oct. 20.-Gustav Jacobson
d three co-defendants were found'
ilty tonight of conspiring to foment
revolution in India. The defend-
ts were also found guilty of violat-
g the neutrality of the United States.
Mass Tech Has Large Fresh Class
The largest freshman class in the
aitov of thA niversity has complet-

MICHIGAN MEN TO
RECEIVE THE DAILY

HUN DESTROYERS
rTORPEDO 9 SHIPS

Board in

Control Passes Resolutions
to Send Copies to
Camps

Michigan men in the different train-
ing camps and in several of the am-
bulance units will have their desire
for University news satisfied when the
srecent action passed by the Board in
Control of Student Publications goes
into effect.
At a meeting, of the board several
days ago a resolution was adopted to
the. effect that a certain number of
each issue of The Daily be sent to the
training camps and ambulance units.
The exact number and where they will
be sent has not as yet been determined.
4
ORDESTACCNATION TO'
STOP SMllPOX SPREAD
STUDENTS ASKED TO APPEAR
BEFORE UNIVERSITY HEALTH
SERVICE
Dr. Harold Forsythe of the Univer-
sity health service has ordered all
students who have patronized the
down town barber shop of Fred Stock-
ing, opposite the D. U. R. waiting
room, since the University opened, to
appear Monday morning for vaccina-
.tion at the health service to prevent
the possible spread of an epidemic of
small pox.4
According to Dr. J. A. Wessinger,
city health officer, the case of Harry
Hey er, 524 Hill street, a barber em-
ployed at the Stocking shop, who was
taken to the University hospital Sat-
urday, is not serious, but he deems
it advisable for t11 who have been in
the barber shop and those who have
never been vaccinated to be at once
as the exposure may have been exten-
sive.
"Students are often careless, and I
thought that it would be the best plan
to take all precautions to prevent a
spreadof thedisease,"said Dr. Wess-
inger.
IMPURE MILK KILLS
THOUSANDS YEARLY
Children and Infants Suffer Through
Carelessness of
Dealers
Lansing, Oct. 20.-That contam-
inated milk slays thousands yearly,
was the assertion of Henry L. Oakley,
assistant secretary of the Michigan
board of health today.
"We laugh at the ostrich hiding its
head when in danger, yet that is the
human trait in regard to milk," says
Oakley. "When the danger is not vis-
ible to the naked eye, we shrug our
shoulders-and let the children and
invalids suffer. Customers should visit
the place where their milk is bottled
and investigate the sanitary condi-
tions surrounding the dairy. The state
board of health is informed that in
some cities the old habit of carrying
milk in a large can and filling the bot-
tles enroute is still in vogue. City
ordinances should prohibit this and if
there is such an ordinance, the health
ot a community demands that it be
enforced. Do not wait for the calam-
ity to come before you start your cam-
paign against impure milk. While
many children become infected with
tuberculosis from milk of tuberculous
cows, many more are killed by dirty
milk from healthy cows. Ordinary
germs getting into good milk render it
poisonous and milk of this kind slays
thousands every year. Badly contam-
inated milk or -dirty milk is highly
actiye poison and is the greatest fac-
tor in the high mortality of infants."
FRATERNITIES MAY INITIATE

NOW WITHOUT RESTRICTION
Campus' fraternities may now in-
itiate their pledgees immediately, ac-
cording to a resolution passed yester-
day by the senate committee on stu-
dent affairs after a formal request of
the inter-fraternity conference. The
resolution passed by the committee is
as follows:
"Resolved, That in view of the .pe-
culiar situation -created by the war,
the rule restricting initiation into fra-
ternities to students having earned 11
hours credit of at least C grade,
earned in one semester, be waived for

Sea Tragedy Costs British
Two Destroyers and 9
Transports

135 Lives,)
of 12

GERMAN CRUISERS BREAK UP
BRITISH CONVOY IN NORTH SEA

Enemy Air Attack Meets
Five Zeppeins Brought
by French Guns

Reverses;
Down

(By Associated Press)
Germany scored on the water in
Saturday's news developments, which
recorded the breaking up of a mer-
chant convoy in the North Sea by raid-
ing cruisers that sank two British de-
stroyers and 9 of 12 convoyed ships.
The enemy suffered little less than a
disaster in the air, however, when
four and probably five Zeppelin air-
ships, believed to be returning from a
raid on England, were brought down
in France.
The sea tragedy cost the British 135
lives. The men on the destroyers
were left to their fate by the German
raiders. About 100 of the merchant
sailors are known to have reached the
shore in boats.
The story of Germany's reverses in
the air began with the account of the
raid on England Friday night in
which the bombs the Zeppelins
dropped killed 27 persons and injured
53 others. Reports soon began to be
received, however, of Zeppelins
brought down in France.
If, as appears from the dispatches,
these were the airships which raided
England, their struggle to get over to
German territory was a long and des-
perate one.
The situation of the Russian fleet,
which was caught by the Germans in
the Gulf of Riga, is serious. The Ger-
mans have placed mines in the gulf
to blockade the exit of the Russians.
On the western fighting front the
artillery battles are continuing.
STUDENTS A 51.1000U
TO LIBERTY LOAN QUOTA

LOAN DRIVE FAILS
TO MEET ESTIMATE
Progress of Campaign Falls Below
Totals Expected by Of-
a Scials
Washington, Oct. 20.-The Liberty
loan campaign today progressed to
the threshold of official expectation
and paused. Treasury officials had
hoped the two-billion-dollar line would
be crossed. Apparently the total
stopped just short of the mark with
an estimated report of $1,983,000,000.
The result means that the sum of
$500,000,000 a day must be subscribed
every day of the week of the cam-
paign with a few millions to spare if
the five-billion-dollar goal is reached
when subscription books close next
Saturday night.
Detroit went over her .maximum
quota of $43,000,000 today, taking first
honors for a major league city. Ef-
forts are now being made to reach
$60,000,000.
I We HOAG TO SPEAK
AT FIRTNON SERYCE
ANN ARBOR BAPTIST CHURCH IN
CHARGE; SIX OTHER
CHURCHES JOIN

*.
s
*
*
*
*
*

* * * * * * *

MICHIGAN AVENGES PAS EET
ARMERELEVEN INTO CA9

SUIDURY

Michigan.........6 0
Aggies.......... 0 0

7
0-

14-27
0- 0

* * *

*
.*
*

* I
-1

Michigan M. A. C.
Goetz.........L.E....... Ramsey
Goodsell........L.T..... Corryell
Boyd ..........L.G........ Leffler
Lambert........ C......... Archer
Culver ........R.G....... Bailey
Weske........ R.T........Frouson
Cartwright .R.E......Bassett
Weston......Q........Kellog
Cohn....... L....... .Oas
Genebach. R.H.......Turner
Wieman.:.... . F.B...... Hammes
Touchdowns-Wieman 3, West-
on.
Goals from touchdowns-Wie-
man 3.
Substitutions - Froemke for
Genebach, Cress for Goetz, Hen-
dershott for Cress, Cruse for Rye,
Barnard for Cruse, Wellford for
Barnard, Weaddock for Wellford,
St. Clair for Cartwright,. Hanish
for St. Clair, Fortune for Culver,
Rye for Cohn. M. A. C.-McCool'
for Oas, Miller for Bailey.
Officials-Haines, Yale, referee;
Holderness, Lehigh, umpire; Ken-
nedy, Chicago, head linesman.

*
*
*
*
*
,*
*
,*

A. C. FAILS TO MAKE
FIRST DOWN IN CON-
TEST

John Wellington Hoag, pastor of the *
Woodward Baptist church of Detroit,
will be the speaker tonight at the first
Sunday evening Union services of the ,
year. The meeting will be held at *

CHINESE CLUB, COMPOSED OF
MEN, PLEDGE $2,500 TO
FUND -

261

Michigan students bought $10,600
worth of the second Liberty loan bond
issue from Friday noon to Saturday
noon, according to the committee Sat-
urday night.
The Chinese club, composed of 26

members, has pledged $2,500.
(Continued on Page Six)

Be-

*
*
*

* * * * * * * * * *
DO YOU KNOW THAT- -

* *
*
*

Liberty bonds are as strong as *
Gibraltar. +*
We must finance our men who
are fighting in France.
Bond houses and banks handle *
Liberty bonds as readily as cash. *
Liberty bonds, up to the value *
of $5,000 are exempt from every *
kind of tax.
The United States has pever *
repudiated its debts; Liberty *
bonds are an indebtedness of the *
nation.*
"Money makes the wheels go
round."
Without cash neither commerce *
nor war can be carried on. 'hat *
is why the United States govern- *
ment is floating a second Liberty *
bond issue. *
There are two ways by which a *
government can raise money to *
conduct its business-by taxation *
and by bonds.
When taxes are levied every *
man must pay whether he can af- *
ford to or not; when bonds are *
sold each man may invest only the *
amount he can afford. *
Failure of the people to rally *
to the government with their sur- *
plus wealth in this time of need *
may necessitate imposing of war *
taxes spread over the entire popu-
lation of the nation. *
Rally to your government and *
give the enemy a knockout with *
an oversubscription to the $3,000,- *
000,000 asked.
* * * * ** ** * *1

7:30 o'clock in Hill auditorium, and
six Ann Arbor churches and the Un-
iversity Y. M. C. A. wil take part, with
'the Baptist church in charge.
The Reverend Hoag has been col-
lege preacher at Amherst college and
at the University of Chicago, and for
five years was pastor of the Calvary
Baptist church, New Haven, Conn. He
gave the convention sermon at the
Baptist state convention ,and is now
pastor of the largest White Baptist
church in Michigan.
Ministers of the churches will sit on
the platform and Professor Leroy
Waterman will preside. The Scripture
will be read by the Reverend Henry
Tatlock and Dr. Thomas Iden will of-
fer the prayer. There will be a solo by
Irving Miller, of the Sohool of Music,
and the Reverend N. C. Fetter will
lead the singing with Mr. Frank Tabor
at the organ.
Football Results
Camp Custer officers, 7; United
States naval training station, 0.
University of Detroit, 26; Kalamazoo
college, 0.
Detroit Central high, 20; Toledo
Scott high, 12.
Northeastern high, 14; Wyandotte
high, 7.
Northwestern high, 66; Michigan
School for Deaf, 0.
Saginaw high, 21; Owosso, 0.
Arthur Hill, 17; Alma high, 0.
Nebraska, 7; Notre Dame, 0.
Case, 9; Baldwin Wallace, 0.
Minnesota, 33; Indiana, 9.
Chicago, 27; Purdue, 0.
Wooster, 0; Akron university, 6.
Illinois, 7; Wisconsin, 0.
Western Reserve, 6; Kenyon, 0.
Army, 26; Tufts, 3.
Harvard Informals, 13; Maine artill-
ery, 0.
Kalamazoo Normal, 83; Notre Dam
freshmen, 0.
Army Movements Must be, Kept Secret
Washington, Oct. 20.-An order has
gone out to all national officers for-
bidding them to communicate with
state authorities formally or informal-
ly any information as to the move-
ment of their own or other units of
the federal armies. Two instances
where messages of this character have
come from Europe resulted in the ac-
tion of the war department.
Adjust' Labor Strike at Portland.
Portland, Ore., Oct. 20.-The ship-
yard strike of the 'Portland district
was officially declared off tonight and
the majority of the unions involved
have voted to rettrn to work. The
federal labor adjustment board left to-
night for San Francisco.
Estimates of Cornell's subscription
to the Liberty loan place it at near
$100,000.

* * * * * * * * * * * * *
FORTY FIVE ATTEND 61Y
DR. J. R. MOTT ADDRESSES GROUP;
CAMP BAND PLAYS
"VICTORS"
Members of the faculty and stu-
dent body of the University broke all
expectations of the "Y" officials Fri-
day when 45 instead of the estimated
25 turned out to attend the Y. M. C. A.
day. at Camp Custer.
The group left here at 8:50 o'clock
and arrived in Battle Creek about
noon. In the afternoon they went to
the meeting in the Post theater and
listened to an address by Dr. John R.
Mott, a member of President Wilson's
Russian commission.
After this meeting they accompanied
some of the Battle Creek business men
to the cantonment. Upon entering the
new building which was being dedicat-
ed that day, they were greeted by
the strains of the "Victors" from one
of the Camp bands. All the soldiers
stood with them and the entire crowd
sang the Michigan song.
After the song was completed the
University delegation gave Michigan
yells, after which they listened to
speeches by Major-General Dikeman,
commandant of the camp, and by Dr.
M. S. Rice of Detroit, whom they are
going to try and secure to come to
Ann Arbor in the near future.
DAILY STAFF BEATS RECORD.
ON M. A. C FOOTBALL EXTRA
The first M. A. C. extra was on the
streets yesterday afternoon three min-
utes and 55 seconds after the final
whistle sounded over Ferry field. Last
year'srecord for placing the extra on
the streets was five minutes, while
that of the year previous was eight
minutes.
A crowd of newsboys met the first
throng leaving Ferry field at the Delta
and their papers were quickly sold. At
6 o'clock every person on State street
was supplied with a copy of the extra.
About 2,500 papers were run off the
press.
Mrs. Cider Hurt in Auto Accident
Mrs. William Cider, a resident of
this city, was knocked down and bad-
ly cut about the head Saturday night
by an automobile driven by Stewart
Warner, 1321 Wilmot street. The ac-
cident occurred at the corner of Wash-
ington and Main streets. Mrs. Cider
was taken to St. Joseph's hospital.
Spring athletics may be given up at
Cornell next year because so little
support is being received from the stu-
dent body.

WIEMAN AND WESTON
STAR FOR WOLVERINES
Big Tad Scores Three Touchdowns
and See Quarter Adds An-
nother Counter
Michigan secured just '27 points'
worth of revenge over the Aggies yes-
terday afternoon when the Wolverine
eleven trounced the East Lansing ag-
gregation by a 27 to 0 score.
In 1913, the Farmers kept one of
Yost's best teams from a perfect sea-
son by a 12 to 7 victory over the Wol-
verines and again in 1915 the gridders
from the agricultural school went
home with a 24 to 0 victory hanging
from their belts.
The defeat Michigan handed the Ag-
gies last fall was not enough to wipe
out the sting of these disgraces. So
the Wolverines picked on the poorest
Farmer eleven that has been on Ferry
field in recent years and slaughtered
its attacks and pummelled its tackles
and ends until they were crying for
mercy. When the dust of battle had
cleared away, Michigan's antiquated
score board showed a 27 total for
the Wolverines and a blank space for
the Aggies.
Weston and Wieman proved to be
the long and short of it as far as
Michigan's attack was concerned. The
little Soo quarter wiggled through the
Farmer Iine almost at will and scored
one touchdown on a beautiful run
around left end. Big Tad tossed the
opposing defense aside and swept on
for innumerable gains. He ran 37
yards to one marker with all the Ag-
gie team hanging onto his legs.
The Michigan line and ends come in
for their share of the glory also. The
threatened weakness of the flanks
failed to show itself, while the linemen
had no respect for the opposing wall
and tore through to stop numerous
plays behind the line. Boyd, Goodsell
and Weske were the best of Michi-
gan's forwards in this respect.
Boyd acts as captain for Wolverines.
Michigan won the toss and elected to
defend the east goal.
The play by quarters:
FIRST'HALF
First Quarter
Culver kicks off for Michigan to M.
A. C.'s five-yard line. 'Hammes fum-
bled and the ball was returned to the
15-yard line. Hammes bucks through
center for a yard. Hammes goes
through left guard for two more yards.
Hammes drops back for a punt and
kicks to Michigan's 30-yard line. Wes-
ton makes 12 yards but the ball is
carried back tg Michigan's 37-yard
line.
Genebach makes one yard. Weston
adds five yards through. center. Wie-
man ploughs through right tackle
making first down. Genebach ploughs
through tackle for four yards. Wes-
ton turns end for two more. Mich-
igan makes a hole in,Aggies' line for
one yard. Weiman drops back for
kick and punts to M. A. C. 15-yard
line. Hammes is downed in his tracks.
Oas tears through center for three
yards. Kellog adds another yard.
Turner fumbles and is thrown for loss.
Hammes drops back for punt and
kicks to Michigan's 50-yard line. Wes-
ton fumbles and is stopped. Weston
makes a hole in Aggies' line and
makes three yards. Tad Wieman adds
two more. Wieman goes through cen-
ter for first down, making 8 yards.
Bassett out but returns to game.
Genebach goes through left tackle for
five yards. Michigan penalized five
yards for offside. Weston makes
three yards through right tackle.
Michigan makes 25 yards on forward
pass to Genebach. Now on 12-yard
line of Aggies. Weston goes around

left end for three&yards.
Crowd yelling for touchdown.
Wieman makes only one yarn through
center meeting stone wall. Fake play
adds two yards and making first down.
Wieman on first play. makes only three
yards, failing to make first down.
Hammes drops back and punts to M.
A. .C. 30-yard line and Weston fum-
(Continued on Page Four)

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