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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 19, 1917 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-10-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

AiN ' L' L i1

ANN AROR WOMEN
K OF LIBERTY BINDS

T

ty

Bond

of Uncle' Sam

and your

it and O'coat

ADVISE STUDENTS TO FOREGO
LUXURIES AND HELP
GOVERNMENT
What some prominent Ann Arbor
women think about the purchase of
Liberty bonds.
Mrs. Henry Adams, 1421 Hill street
says, "College girls usually have a
margin on their allowance and if they
are willing to deny themselves some
of the little unnecessaries they may
be able to buy a Liberty bond."
Mrs. T. E. Rankin, 605 Oswego'
street, expresses the following senti-
ment: "The most helpful thing that
those of us who stay at home can do
in our national crisis, is to work hard
in -making up a new personal budget
and give the difference between that
and the old one to the Liberty loan."
Mrs. J. L. Markley, 1816 Geddes av-

OF

Plug Your Ears
Corduroys Appear
Resolution Adopted at Senior Assem-
bly to Sanction Distinctive
Trousers
Sh-h, hush and also do a little hark-
ening, have you heard that faint shrill
creak that has echoed over the south-
east corner of the campus for the past
day or so? That subtle squeaking, is
it some verdant engineer trying in
vain tomake his recalcitrant sewer
pipes fit, or is it a buzz saw in the
distance, hitting a few knots?
At last the mystery is solved, it's
merely the senior engineers strolling
about the campus in their corduroy
trousers and as they stroll their good
old corduroys do the squeaking. When
several are hurrying to class garbed
they creak like a new Ford being
broken in.
A resolution was passed at the
senior assembly sanctioning their
wear and while a few have blossomed
out already the great majority of the
class have remained unchanged in the
matter of trousers.
COAL STKESETTLED
SON THIN OFICIS
READY WITH DRASTIC MEANS
IF NEGOTIATIONS SHOULD
FAIL

Sheehan & Co.
Ann Arbor Detroit
PHONE 600 OPEN E V E N I NOG S PHONE 800
ARCADE FLORAL SHOP

Text-Books and
For all Courses

WE SUPPLY EVERY STUDENTS' NEED

I

NICKELS ARCADE

OPPOSITE SUB-POST OFFICE

I

it i

JI K. Jialcolm
Liberty street

Flower Department
A COMPLETE STOCK OF
FLOWERS FOR ALL
OCCASIONS
FL QWERING PLANTS
FU PER POTTERY
CORSAGES A SPECIALTY

S
E
R
V
C
E

Kodak pepariment
EASTMAN KODAKS.
FILMS AND SUPPLIES
KODAK FINISHING OUR SP$CI-
ALTY - EIGHT HOUR SERVICE
ALL WORK GUARANTEED
DEV. 1 Oc PRINTS S, 4, Sc

BADE JEWELER

HAND COLORED PRtN T S AND ENLARCEMENTS

CARL F. BAY

enue, thinks "College girls can
money with which to purchase a1
if they can not spare enough
their allowance."
Miss Alice Evans, director of
sical education for women,e
"Every woman who possibly

earn
bond
from
phy-
says,
can

Watch and Jewelry Repairing

NICKELS ARCADE,

We've some
CAPS
that will make
you
w away any cap you ever wore before in
your life
They're imported-wonderful weaves-
English woolens-one-piece crowns-
full visars-they're keen
THE HAT SHOP OF-
-IOSI J. FLATTERY
. DETROIT
74 Washington Blvd.
'N 1-.,

should invest in Liberty bondq, be-
cause, besides laying up for the future
it is a definite way in which those who
stay at home can be of real service to
those who are giving everything."
Miss Greenwood of Martha Cook
building expresses this opinion, "Too
much cannot be done by the women
at this time for the Liberty loan. We
must stand by the government first,
'1;st, and always."
Miss Wells of Newberry residence
thinks that, "Three-fourths of.the girls
in college by a little self-denial could
buy. one or more Liberty bonds. It is
a duty we ought to perform even at
considerable sacrifice."
Anna Lloyd, '18, says, "We should
not leave it to the poor and foreign
born to be the only patriotic Ameri-
cans. We should all make enough
sacrifice to buy a bond." -
Clarissa Vyn, '18, tells her senti-
ments in the following: "Every Amer-
ican woman and surely every Michi-
gan woman should heartily support
the .Liberty loan."
Helen Burke, president of the Y.
W. C. A., says: "We should consider
the purchase of a Liberty bond a
splendid opportunity to express our
patriotism and demonstrate our co-
operation with the men at the front."

ir

GOING ON

:onist society
Natural Sci-
u literary so-
i rooms, Uni-

s meeting in Hill
for Methodist stu-
parlors, corner of

club dance

Engineering News
First assembly of the senior engi-
neers was held Thursday and several
speakers addressed the assembly. Pro-
fessor Anderson spoke, urging the
senior mechanical engineers to join
the American Society of Mechanical
Engineers. After Dean Cooley had
spoken on Liberty bonds, the class
passed a resolution that each one
should purchase at least a $50 bond.
Chairman F. J. Kortick, '18, gave the
report of the honor committee. Class
officers, were nominated and will be
elected soon. A resolution was also
passed that senior engineers would
wear corduroy trousers.
The sophomore engineers held their
first assembly Thursday at 8:30
o'clock. No officers were elected, but
several nominations were made from
which class officers will be chosen
soon.
Woolsack Initiates Five New Men
Banqueting last night at the Renel-
len Hospice, Woolsack, junior law
honor society, initiated five new mem-
bers to membership.
Prof. Ralph W. Aigler of the Law4
school addressed the society on tek
subject of "Liberty Bonds," while

He Quits Candy
And Buys A .Bond
She Didn't Think It Fair, Although He
Owned a Liberty Bond, and
Sent Him Home
"You see," he said with pride in his
voice, as he appared Sunday evening
sans the usual box of candy, "I went
to the Liberty -loan banquet. No one
could have attended that banquet
without feeling that he wanted to help.
One of the speakers spoke especially
about the wastefulness of candy and
flowers as gifts for the girls. He said
that giving up our litle extravagances
was one way of doing our bit. You un-
understand, don't you?"
"Of course, you dear," cooed she en-
thusiastically, "I am more than will-
ing to give up a weekly box of sweets
as my share. And tell me about the
feed last night, was it a success?"
"It was great. We had some fine
cigars, the best I ever smoked!"
He went home that night much
earlier than usual.
FIRST FACULTY CONCERT IS
GREETED BY LARGE AUDIENCE
Mr. James Hamilton fully confirmed
his reputation as a tenor of excep-
tional temperament and ability, at the
first faculty concert of the year at
Hill auditorium yesterday afternoon.
Mr. Hamilton rendered a number of
selections to a large ajudience. His
first number, "Aria, Lucevan Le'
Stelle," Puccini, and hi, last selection,
"Call Me No More," by'-Cadman, were
especially well receive .
Mr. Albert Lockwood opened the
program with a pianoforte number,
"Prelude Aria and Finale," by Cesar
Franck, and closed it with "Ballade,
Op. 52, F Minor," Chopin.
"Ballade and Polonaise, Op. 38,"
Vieuxtemps, was sympathetically in-
terpreted to an appreciative audience
by Mr. Samuel P. Lockwood, violinist.
Senior Dents Elect Class Officers
At a meeting of the senior dental
class yesterday morning, F. J. Henry,
18D, was elected president; Bidwell C.
Hanson, '18D, vice-president; Victor
Adams, '18D, treasurer, and Max Wil-
liams, '18D, secretary.

Washington, Oct. 18.-Both Fuel
Administrator Garfield and President
John P. White of the United Mine
Workers expressed confidence today
that the strike of coal miners in the
central competitor's field of Ohio, Il-
linois, Indiana and Pennsylvania
would be settled within a short time.
President White left tonight for In-
dianapolis where he will continue his
efforts to introduce the men to return
to work.
Pending the outcome of negotiations
between Mr. White and the miners,
Dr. Garfield would not say what move
he contemplated under his threat to
the miners yesterday to invoke what-
ever measure would be necessary to
insure working of the miners at full
capacity. Should Mr. White's efforts
fail, however, it is understood the fuel
administration is prepared to lay be-
fore President Wilson a drastic plan
for making certain an adequate coal
supply.
GRAND RAPIDS ACQUITS MEN
TRIED FOR OPPOSING DRAFT
Grand Rapids, Oct. 18.-Adolph Ger-
mer of Chicago, executive secretary
of the national Socialist party and
10 other persons were acquitted- by a
jury in the United States district
court here this evening of charges of
conspiracy against the selective draft.
All the defendants were tried to-
gether and with the exception of Ger-
mer, all were residents of this city.
Nine of them were members of the
Social'ist party. 4
The charge against them was the
perparation and circulation of liter-
ature which the government held was
intended to induce young men not to
register. The jury in its verdict de-
clared this was not the purpose of the
literature and that there had been no
conspiracy. In his charge to the jury,
Judge Sessions made it clear that so-
cialism was not on trial, and that the
duty of the jurors was to determine
whether any of the -defendants had
conspired to defeat the purpose of the
draft law.
Marshall Condemns M. A. C. Building
East Lansing, Oct. 18.-College hall,
one of the oldest buildings on the cam-
pus of the Michigan Agricultural col-
lege, has been condemned by the fire
,marshal. A committee of some of the
most prominent alumni of the college
are in Lansing making an appeal to
save the building.
Judge Carpenter of Detroit, headed
the committee and with him are Henry
Haigh and R. R. McCall of Detroit
and Frank Rogers, state highway com-
missioner, of Lansing. Up to this time
they have secured no action.
U. of M. Jewelry. J. L. Chapman's
is the place. 113 S. Main.-Adv.

LAPEL
FRONT
kARL 6W LSON 0, a' diS
TR0YS BEST PRODLJtfC7
SMASH FOR LIBERTY LOAN
QUOTA GAINS MOMENTUM
(Continued from Page One)
paign seriously and refuted the- charge
of slacker now being made against
the student body. A brief statement
of what women are doing in other
countries was given by Stephen Att-
wood, '18E, president of the Student
council. Clarissa Vyn, '18, president
of the athletic association, and Anna
Lloyd, '18, president of the Women's
league, gave short talks, and Albert
E.. Horne, '18, explained the me-
chanical details of purchasing a bond.
A number of first payments on bonds
were made after the meeting.
Loan Parade Saturday
Arrangements are being made forj
a mammoth Liberty loan parade to be
held Saturday before the M. A. C.
game. Mr. F. Bacon, '02, in charge,
is planning to have the entire student
body .take part. A large representa-
tion of townspeople, a company of 180
soldiers from Camp Custer, the entire
M. A. C. delegation, and the M. A. C.
regimental band are expected to fall
in line with the students. Detailed
plans will appear in tomorrow's Daily.
Ann Arbor's Liberty loan commit-
tee succeeded in raising $430,900, one-
half of the city's quota, according to
reports issued late yesterday. The
city loan enthusiasts have hopes of
over-subscribing the local quota.
Residents in Doctor Peterson's
Nurses' home, Tuesday night, sub-
scribed $1,300 to the loan fund. Part-
nership bonds are proving popular
among city folk.
Boy Scouts Help
The National B Scout campaign
for the Liberty loa starts Oct. 20 and
continues until Oct. 25. Medals will
be given all scouts selling 10 or more
bonds. President Wilson has offered
a silk flag to the troop selling the
largest number Qf bonds in the coun-
try. The Boy Scouts of America sold
$23,000,000 bonds for the first Liberty
loan, their quota for this loan is $f5,-
000,000. A special manual of instruc-
tion has been issued to the boys, giv-
ing hints for bond selling.
Hundreds of bonds have already
been sold by the Ann Arbor troops
for which they are to be given due
credit.
Detroit, Oct. 18.-With local sub-
scriptionsto the Liberty loan totaling
more than $32,500,000, confidence was
expressed today by those in charge of

Originality=
harnessed into
channels of
taste, account
the popularit
Ruby Footwea
SHOES

the campaign that Detroit would pass
its quota $43,000,000 by Saturday, and
that the close of the drive will see
more than $50,000,000 subscribed for.
Abner E. Larned, who heads the
local loan comnittee, today corrected
an impression that Detroit was given
a quota of $60,000,000. The federal
reserve district expects only $43,000,-
000 from this city, but every effort
would be made to make it as near
$60,000,000 as possible.
KAISER TELLS UNIONS ARMY
WILL WITHSTAND ATTACKS
Amsterdam, Oct. 18.- The German
emperor has sent the following tele-
gram to the Kyffhauser federation of
German landeskrieger unions:
"I beg you to transmit my thanks
and greetings to the representatives
of the landeskrieger unions for their
renewed pledge of loyalty. The spirit
cultivated in the Krieger clubs of joy-
ous, seif-secrificing comradeship and
death-defying loyalty to emperor and
empire has strongly approved itself
in hard war-time on the battlefield and
at home.
"The Fatherland is proud of its
young and old warriors. They will
stand there against all hostile at-
tacks and criminal attempts to in-
troduce disunion into the ranks of
the German people in arms, indissoul-
ubly bound to its ancestral purpose."
The number of troops carried.
through the Suez Canal last year was
235,000. There was an increase of
66,000 French, 38,000 Britisl, 9,000
Russian, and 3,000 Italian ships as
compared with the previous year.
Dancing from 9 to 12 every Satur-
day night at Armory.-Adv.

for
MEN and
WOMEN

Alfred J.1
I&CORP
NIC
A "

ODE

the
good
is for
y of
ar.

IN DETROIT
101 Washington Blvd.

as club meets
on street.

. A. C.

oom Bible class
tate street.

meet at 7
auditorium
orm should
he rll call
g pole at 4
e no drill.

We are the only

8 or zng Prof. E. C. Goddard of the Law school
who have spoke on "The Spirit of the Profes-
eir names ,, ,n" L.LPollock '19L and L. G.

rea

ry

r A0

L . A e V 1 L , . 1 V 1 li , L / , W i I M
L. A. Field, '19L, spoke in behalf of the in-
hington,
Signed. The medal of the Distinguished Ser-
vice order has been awarded to Lcrd
Dudley Gladstone Gordon, major of
' before the Ninth Batt,.lion of Gordon I*gh-
bI Shop. landers, for distinguished conduct in
---. .+,An.aa +

Students'

Supply

Store

Fix up Your Room now.
Pilolv Tops

We have Michigan Pennants, a
Come in and Look over Our Stock

Films Debeloped for Joe

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