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June 06, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-06-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

E WEATHER
BABLY SHOWERS;
TODAY

i
t
F

"IMP 04W

Iatg

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NwHT WIRE
SERVICE

VIII. No. 179.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, JUNE 6, 1918:

PRICE THREE CENTS

£510ENT'TOBE 9,1 E
"E 23
UNCE SENIOR ASSEMBLING
[AVES4; TO -MEET JNSH)E
IF RAINY
>RESS TO BE GIVEN
N4 HILL AUDITORIUM

nt Harry U. HIutchliis
f upoi lantilMessage for
G~raduates~

ii 's

President Harry B. Hutchins has
en appointed to deliver the bac-
laureate address to the graduating
ss this year at 7:30 o'clock June
in Hill auditorium. The presi-
nt has a very Important message
r the class of 1918 which every
aduate should hear.
Assembng Places
rhe assembling places for both
ccalaureate address and con-
ncement day address are the same.
the weather is fair the various
sses will assemble as follows:
Pharmaceutical on east walk
uth end of Chemistry building.
meopathic, including nurses from
>meopathic training school, on
uth end of walk west of Chemistry
ilding. Dental on west walk south
d of Chemistry building. Medical,
luding nurses from University
spital training school, on walk west
e of medical building. Laws on
gonal at rear of Law building. En-
Ieers and architects on walk in en-
Leering court. Literary on walk
tween Tappan hall and Museum.
aduate school on walk east of
dth wing .and University hall.
ard of Honor section on the broad
1k In front of University hall or in
in corridor. Alumni on walk in
nt of Memorial building.
Rain Schedule Prepared
A. different schedule has been ar-
iged in case the weather is rainy.
sprnkle will not :be considered
ny. It must actually rain with no
spect' of clearing. In that case
march will be abandoned. Classes
LI then assemble as follows:
Everyone who participates in the
rade will assemble in Hill auditor-
n. Graduate school in passage be-
id seats in the parquet. Literary
ss in east end of foyer and lobby.
gineers and architects in middle of
rer. Medics and laws in west end
foyer and lobby. Pharmic, homoe-
s and dental classes in west half
foyer and lobby between engineers
d medics. Alumni in hall on sec-
d floor in the rear'of the first bal-
ny. Guard of Honor section in
>ms on second and third floors at
st end of the stage divided be-
een the two rooms. President and
tor of the day and guests of hon-
two heralds, and two color bear-
, in the two rooms on the first
:r at the west end of the stage
the stage level. The band will
ry on the stage while the differ-
t sections assemble.
:W ELECTRIC BRASS FURNACE
ELTS COPPER ORE SPEEDILY
Detroit, June 5. - Successful trials
a newly devised rocking electric
ass furnace in a Detroit munitions
ant, is said by officials of the com-
ny, to have solved the problem of
.elting copper ores speedily, thor-
ghly and economically. With the
stallatlon of the new furnace, the
>duction of war materials will be
ich speeded, according to the offi-
l.
'he new type of furnace was devis-
by chemists In the bureau of
nes, after five years' experiment-
g. With it, the munitions plant is
abled to smelt ores containing both
h percentages of zinc and low
odes. At the same time, the fur-
ce, by its rocking movement, keeps
e molten mass at an even tempera-
re, a condition said to be difficult
th the old type fuel furnace. Heat
furnished by an electric arc.
Patents for the furnace have been
signed to Secretary of the Interior
.ne as trustee. The government
s been given full license to in-
ill the furnaces in any munitions

R FPORT ANTI-DRAFT
RIOTS IN OKLAHOMA
:.::kogee, Oka., June 5. - Anti-
'ir.<ft rilots are reported to have brok-
Eri out; among the Crete Indians in
1!-rn Okmulgee county and the
lcnr~etta home guards, accompanied
oyV La;Jit 100 civilians, have left for
..!d stamping grounds, scene of
h : Cazy Snake rebellion, where it
is said that about 500 Indians are
.el Two whites are reported
o have been shot by the Indians.
A farmer brought report to Henry-
* a of attacks of two white farm-
rs. i nd that the whites in the vi-
cinty were arming the Indians, who
we re reported to have been anger-
,d when 60 of their young men were
ordered to report for army service.
ENROLLMENT IN MEDICAL
SCHOOL BEGINS JUNE 15
ACTiON TO IKEEP PRE-1EDIC)IS OF
DIRAFT AGE FROM ACTIVE
SERVICE
The Medical school has received
from Washington authority by which
it will be possible for the school to
enroll in June those students who are
registered under the draft act and who
have completed all of their pre-med-
ical requirements, instead of waiting
until the usual time in September.
Such students may present them-
selves to the secretary of the Medical
School at any time after June 15,
bringing full credentials of their pre-
medical work. They will then be en-
rolled in the Medical school, and fees
for the year 1918-9 paid to the treas-
urer of the University in order to
complete the medical enrollment and
establish status as bona fide medical
students.
Lay Eder NL E. I. C.
When the enrollment is completed,
the student may apply to the surgeon
general of the army for permission to
enter the medical enlisted reserve
corps. When this permission is re-
ceived and the enlistment is complet-
ed, a report of the fact is to be made
to the student's local draft board and
he is then to be placed in class V-D,
as being in the service of the United
States He is detailed to pursue his
medical studies in the school and is
not to be called to active military ser-
vice except in case of an emergency.
Full particulars of the proceedure to
be followed in order to enlist in the
medical enlisted reserve corps can
be obtained at the Medical school at
the time of enrollment. In order to
join the medical enlisted reserve
corps, a man must be registered under
the draft law, and must be either a
native born American, or must have
his first papers in case he was born
in a foreign country, unless he was
born in an enemy country, in which
case he is not eligible for enlistment.
Women Not to Enroll Early
Women -who are expecting to enter
medicine and men who because of age
have not had to register and who are,
therefore, not subject to draft, will
not be enrolled in the school at this
time but will be received at the usual
time in the fall. It would help the
authorities of the school however, if
such pre-medical students would re-
port to the secretary of the Medical
school that they intend to enter in the
fall in order to give some idea as to
the size of the entering class.
IESTRICTIONS IN SUGAR SALES

ORDERED BY AIDMINISTRATION
lAigid restriction in the sale of sug-
ar for other than essential purposes,
has been ordered by the food ad-
ministration. George A. Prescott,
state food administrator, sent the
following communication to the lo-
cal board:
"It is important' that you inform
all less essential manufacturers that
they must file a report before June
10. This applies to non-essential
manufacturers whether they require
any sugar before July 1 or not.
"As time is short, it calls for
prompt action on your part to get
this information to the manufactur-
ers. Under the instructions; all of
these manufacturers who fail to make
their report on the date above men-
tioned are subject to the penalty of
having their sugar taken for other
uses."

NORWEGIAN SHIP
SUNKNEAR COAST
Steamner Cibs Destroyed by German
Subs 40 Miles Off Virginia Cape;
Entire Crew Rescued
F -BlOATS FIRE 1) ShOTrs AT
FRENCH TANKER RA DIOLEINE
War Board Cabinet Discusses Sub-
marine Activities; Delivery of
Food Overseas Not Affected
Washington, June 5.-Sinking by the
German submarines of the Norwegian
steamer Gibs, about 40 miles off the
Virginia cape at 5 o'clock yesterday
afternoon, was reported at the naval
department tonight. The entire crew
was rescued today.
Fire 14 Shots at IRadioleine
Washington, June 5.-The story of
the French tanker Radioleine attack-
ed by a submarine off the Maryland
coast yesterday, reached the naval
department today, showing that the
raider had fired 15 shots from a long
range before an American destroyer
answering an S. 0. S. appeared.
Submarine Disappears
The destroyer dashed full speed
ahead toward the enemy which
promptly disappeared. When the de-
stroyer reached the spot where the
submarine disappeared, the Radioleine
was too far away to see what had
happened. None of the shots hit the
tanker, and three- which she fired at
the raider went over.
The captain said that the submarine
was so big that when his lookout
sighted her six miles away he report-
ed her as an American destroyer.
War Cabinet Discusses Situation
Washington, June 5. - Submarine
activities off the American coast was
discussed today at a session of the
war board cabinet. Afterward food
Administrator Hoover said that the
food supply for the Americans over-
seas had not been in danger by the
appearance of enemy raiders, and that
no fears were entertained in that re-
gards.
MEDICS VOTE TO
GRADUATE EARLIER

UNION MAY ACCEPT
TWO OPERA BOOKS
Two of the scenarios submitted for
the 1919 Union opera are, according
to Prof. Earl V. Moore, of the School
of Music, among the best that have
ever been offered.
The writers are Milton Marx, '19,
and Harry P. Bennett, '19 ,and Ken-
drick L. Kimball, '20. The two lat-
ter collaborated on one of the scen-
arios. Bennett was in this year's
Opera and Marx is on The Daily staff.
Bennett has enlisted and is now
awaiting his call. The committee has
asked that. both books be written, as
there is a possibility of using one of
them in 1920.
Students who wish to submit music
for next year's opera are requested
to meet at 7:15 o'clock Friday night
at the Union for instructions.
GLEE CLUBS' LAST SING
FEATURED BY WAR MUSIC

E WiMA N
NIGHIT

AMERICANS PENETRATE ENEMY LINES
IN LUNEVILLE SECTOR; FRENCH REPEL
ADVANCE OF HUNS; REGAINGROUN
CADETS ARE TO BE PERSHIN(G REPORTS LOSSES :
BETTER UNIFORMED FLICTED ON FOE BY HIS
PATROLS

I

PARODY BRINGS MID.
SONS QUARTET MUCH
APPLAUSE

War songs well handled sums up
the year's final appearance of the
Glee and Mandolin clubs in Hill aud-
itorium last night. The program
opened with the "Star Spangled Ban-
ner' 'and the "Marseillaise," closed
with "America," and was interspersed
with a scattering of the livelier and
lighter popular war songs of the day.
Repeated Encores
Three offerings rendered by mem-
bers of the combined clubs deserve
special mention. All received re-
peated encores from the rather small
audience. The midnight sons quar-
tet gave several numbers pleasing to
the listeners, especially a German
parody. The jazz band played some
of the popular music of the day in
a manner which caused them to re-
ceive continued applause.
Robert R. Dieterle, .18-'21M, han-
dled well the role of soloist. The
Glee club leader showed a voice bet-
ter than that of any of his previous
appearances. In baritone solo "Di
Provenza it Mar," Dieterle displayed a
broad range and knowledge of rendi-
tion, which made his effort stand out
above any other single number of the

Uniforms for the University R. 0.
T. C. next year will be less burlappy
than those of this year's organiza-
tion, according to Sec. Shirley Smith.
The University officials put the]
question before the cadets and the
corps decided to arrange for better
uniforms. A deposit will probably be
asked of each student to cover the
total cost of a tailor-made, serge out-
fit. When the government commu-
tation is allowed, the equivalent sum
paid by the student will be refund-i
ed, the balance being retained to cov-z
er the additional expense of the bet-{
ter uniform.
Lieutenant Mullen has authorized'
the students to take their uniforms1
home with them this summer. If
they so desire next Fall, they can use]
the same suits. Since the vote for
better uniforms was almost unani-
mous, it is unlikely that many of this
year's hairy sacks will be seen ont
the campus in 1918-9. No measure-;
ments for new outfits will be takent
until Fall. The cost will be fromi
$25 to $35 each.t
ANNOUNCE EXAM SCHEDULE FOR
JUNIOR MEDICAL STUDENTS
The examination schedule for the
junior medical class has been an-
nounced as follows: Friday, June 7, t
Obstetrics; Saturday, June 8, Gynec-
ology; Monday, June 10, Pathology;
Tuesday, June 11, State Boards; Wed-t
nesday, June 12, Pediatrics; Thurs-
day, June 13, Neurology; Friday,
June 14, Surgery; Saturday, June 15,
Syphilology.
PROF. H. P. THIEME RECEIVES
TWO IMPORTANT APPOINTMENTS
That Michigan's faculty men are
gaining national recognition is shown
in two appaointments just received by
Prof. H. P. Thieme, of the French de-
partment. Professor Thieme has been
chosen general editor of the MacMil-
lan and company's series of French
texts.
He has also been selected to act as
director of French at Camp -Custer,
where he will be stationed during the
coming summer.
P. A. Kruger, '17L, Commissioned
Paul A. Kruger, '17L, has been com-
missioned a lieutenant at Camp Shel-
by, Mississippi, and is to be sent to
a national army camp soon, accord-
ing to word received by his parents
last week.
Lieutenant Kruger -attended the of-
ficers' training camp at Leon Springs,
Texas, together with a number of
men from the University, the early
part of this year.
Foreign Students Entertain Patients
Patients and attendants at the Uni-
versity hospital will be entertained
by meners of the combined chap-
.ers of the Cosnaopc an club at 7:45
o'clock next Fr&)v Y evein' in the
dining roof.i of !!,' hopit a. The pro-
gram will be a s harge of Nilkanth
Caavre, spec. era~ There will be s v-
erol musical selections and a Japan-
Pse fencing feature
A combined meeting of the two
thapters will be held son,

ENEMY FAILS TO MAKE
PROGRESS IN ATTACKS
Russians Credited with Victory Over
,,Turks and Germans in Trans-
Caucasia
(By The Associated Press)
With the American army in France,
June 5.-An American patrol of 30
men penetrated to the enemy third line
in the Luneville sector early this
morning. The Americans encounter-
ed 200 Germans, and attacked them
with grenades, bayonets, and bullets.
The fight lasted 20 minutes and many
losses were inflicted on the enemy.
The American loss was extremely
light.
Repel German Advance
Paris, June 5.-All the efforts of the
Germans to advance in the French
sectors have been repelled, according
to the war office announcement to-
night. Ground has been regained by
the French and prisoners taken.
Washington, June 5.- An official
dispatch from France today says the
French press is commenting in the
warmest terms on the intervention of
American troops in the great battle
taking place between the Oise and the
Marne.
"All the newspapers lay stress upon
the brilliant operations of the Veuilly
and of Jaulgonne," says the message.
Penetrate Enemy Positions.
Washington, June 5.-Pent-ration of
enemy positions in Picardy and Lor-
raine by American patrols, which in-
flicted losses upon the enemy in kill-
ed and wounded, was reported to-
night in General Pershing's commun-
ique. In the Woevre, artillery fight-
ing has diminished.
Berlin, via London, June 5.- "On
the battle front the situation is un-
changed," said the German official
communication issued tonight.
London, June 5.-As a temporary
measure, it was officially announced
tonight, General Sir William Robert-
son, chief of the Eastern command,
and former chief of the interior staff,
has been appointed to command the
forces in Great Britian.
(By The Associated Press)
The Allied stonewall of resistance
is still imposed against the Germans
on the battle front from Soissons to
Chateau Thierry. Nowhere is the
enemy making progress.
The fury of the invaders, 'towever,
has not yet been checked for all along
the front they are launching assaults
in various sectors in hopes that the
Allied ranks will give way.
Allied ntes Hold
Gried masses of artillery and large
numberlfm iroops are being used by
the C. ni i aah34 continuous
f o:1 I Fin I notwith5 aning this
a~ti Allid line everywhere has
held strongly.
Statlld liig ent in sharo contrast,
prexioos onimUniaios, issued by
the war ofices claiming gains by feats
of ma, or the faliug backf
19 th -s t - -
" '1 r "te . s °F..n

evening.

At a meeting of the junior medical
class this week, the class voted to
submit a petition to the faculty of the
medical school to be allowed to be-
gin their senior year on July 1.
This action comes as the result of
a letter received from the war de-
partment by the medical school, ask-
ing that they consider the feasibility
of running through the summer for
the present junior class and for as
many of the other classes as was
deemed advisable.
The faculty has not taken any ac-
tion on the petitions as yet. A meet-
ing of the deans of all the medical
schools of the country has been call-
ed for June 11 at Chicago, and the
matter will then be discussed with a
view to making it a national move-
ment.
This will affect some of the pres-
ent junior class in that they are de-
pendent in a measure for the money
that they earn during the summer to
carry on their school work. Others
have already signed up for interne-
ships for the summer but the spirit
of the class was shown in the meet-
ing when they met the present crisis
for furnishing medical men to the
army by voting unanimously to be-
gin July 1 and be able to graduate
about March 1, 1919. A meeting will
be held Friday night by the medi-
cal faculty to make a final decision
upon the matter.
lfnge Spark Plugs in Air
Miami, Fla., June 5.-Paul Dickey,
06A, and Joseph Bennett, aviators at
the Miami, Florida, school,have sue-
cessfully changed spark plugs at a
height of 8,000 feet, a performance
which was considered impossible
theretofore. They stopped the motor
by stalling, changed the spark plugs
and started by a nose dive.
Reichle Admitted to Ensign School
Richard W. Reichle, '20, was re-
cently admitted to the Ensign School
at the Great Lakes Training station.
Richard Reichle was one of the stars
on this year's All-fresh baseball team.
He was a member of Phi Kappa Sig-
ma fraternity.

Fichigan Songs
Few of the old Michigan favorite1
songs were given. The only one with
the exception of the newer "Blue
Book Blues" was "Farewell to You,
Old State Street." which brought out,
the improvement of the Glee club
since its earlier concert.
SANITARY ENGINEERS ASK
TO BE TAKEN IN SERVICE
Nine students in civil engineering
who have for the past year been pur-
suing special work in sanitary engi-
neering under Major W. C. Hood and
Prof. A. J. Decker, of the engineering
college, have petitioned the chief of
engineers of the United States army
requesting that they be called into
active service and be transferred to
the sanitary corps with assignment l
to the army medical school. They
ask that the transfer be dated June
19. -I
With the - ion of three or
four students .:lho have not co ;-
pleted their wo-. t.h amb. will
complete the group who have been.
preparing for wrk i the sanitar,
corps. Nine id-Ots left the Uni-
versity at the end of the first s ef S-
ter for this work A number of these
are now in France in active service.
the others being still in this country
It was the intention origiaflly that
these men would he placed in charge
of the sanitation of camps and can-
tonments in this country after re-
ceiving some tmamning In this work
from older and more exerienced san-
itary engineers. Later plans of the
war department assgned some of
these men to water tank trains for
service over seas
Gymn Lockers .Asked to Be Cieared
All lockers in Watrmau gymna-
siurn are requested to ec cleared Ve-
fore June 10 by Dr. George A. May,
physical director, in order that toe
building can be placed in eondit'ion
for the incomin draft e.
The club hoe on Farry field w ill
be used by sum+r seon s ndeut
in place of the - m t e yymua-
sium.

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