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June 05, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-06-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

B3LY HOWERIS; -0jo
TODAYj

aitg

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
~DAY AND NicTr "IREG
SERVICE

ANN ATARRP TCWTTT(AM VWEDNESD~AY JUNE 5. 118. PRICE THREE CENT

_ , i

SURVIVORS oF UAR
DEFINITELY THAT A
SU-BATS OPERAT
* * * * * * * * * * * * *
* *
* Senior Invitations *
* Senior invitations will be ex- *
* changed for announcements from *
* 9 to 12 o'clock today in Univer- *
* sity hal. Only those who have*
* madeh' arrangements previousl *
* may make this exchange. *
* *
FORMER ICRRESIDET,
CHAR LES FIRBANKS, DIES
WAS PROMINENT IN POLITICS
MANY YEARS; FRIEND OF
McKINLEY
Indianapolis, June 4. - Charles
Fairbanks, former vice-president of
the United States, and former United
States senator from Indiana, died at
his home here at 8:55 o'clock tonight.
Death was due to nethritis, which
has been a chronic illness with him,
t but not regarded as particularly se-
rious until recently. All members of
r the former vice-president's family,
execpt Major Richard Fairbanks, who
is in France, were at his bedside.
Born in Log Cabin
I The distinction of birth in a log
cabin, which illustrious Americans of
- an earlier day commonly had, was al-
. so that of former Vice-President
> Fairbanks. It is probable that he
e was the last of American statesmen
e to have been born in one of these
f humble cabins.
The one where he was born on May
t 11, 1852, was at Unionville Center,
e Ohio.
- Mr. Fairbanks traced 'his ancesa
' tors to the days of Oliver Cromwell,
- who counted "Fayerbankes" among
- his, supporters. Jonathan Fayer-
bankes, the first member of the fam-
ily to come to America, landed at
Boston in 1636. Mr. Fairbanks' fa-
ther was Loriston Monroe Fairbanks,
a wagonmaker of Vermont, who emi-
grated to Union County, 0. His moth
er was a sister of the late William
Henry Smith, once general manager
of the Associated Press.
g Slave Refuge
n The Fairbanks home frequently
was the hiding place of runaway
slaves and no black man ever wa
s turned away from the door.
Fairbanks at 15 entered Ohio Wes
e leyan college, sharing an attic room
with the son of another farmer, an
e the two cooked their own meals. Fair
d banks did carpenter work to earn hi
e first law books.
s After marriage Mr. Fairbanks mov
.d ed to Indianapolis and opened a la
n- office. He took a deep interest in pol
itics and assisted in local, state, an
y national campaigns, managed Walte
r- Q. Gresham's campaign for the Re
g, publican nomination for the presi
of dency in 1888 and later labored in
y. dustriously for Benjamin Harrison'
he nomination.
s's Friend of McKinley
In January, 1897, Mr. Fairbank
was elected to the senate. He too
n his seat on March 4, the dayon whic
mn McKinley became President. He b
:e came a close adviser of the Presi

.g. dent in the trying times before an
o- during the Spanish-American War
e- Among Mr. Fairbanks' greatest sere
ices to his country were those per
formed while he was a member of th
United States and British joint com
ed mission, which dealt with the Alaska
it- boundary, lake fishing and oth
,u- questions.
an Mr. Fairbanks was recognized a
ea- one of the national leaders of the R
(Continued on Page Six)

LINA ESTABLISH
T LEAST 2 ENEMY
E OFF NEW JERSEY
WAR1NINGS FROM SOUTH CARO-
LINA AND MARYLAND MAY
MEAN OTHERS PRESENT
WASHINGTON EXPECTS
GREATEST PRODUCTION
American Destroyer Interrupts At-
tack on French Steamer and
Saves Vessel
BULLETIN
Washington, June 4.-On the heels
of the submarine raid in the north
Atlantic, the shipping board announe-
ed tonight that the production of ship-
ping vessels during Slay was the great-
est in history. There were completed
and delivered 44 ships, totaling 263,-
571 tons, three times the output of
January, and twice that of February.
(By The Associated Press)
Washington, June 4.-Statements of
survivors of the steamship Carolina
landed at Lewis, Del., that their ves-
sels were destroyed by the submarine
U-37, established definitely that at
least two German submarines have
been operating off the Atlantic coast.
Reports to the naval department show
that the U-151 sank the schooner Eat-
tie Dunn and Edna.
Ship Sunk Again Floated
Washington, June 4. - The tank
steamer Herbert L. Pratt sunk yester-
day by a German submarine off t~h
Deleware cape has been floated and i,
now being towed to harbor for re-
pairs, the navy department announc-
ed tonight.
Washington, June 4.-A destroyer
reported to the naval department to-
night that she interrupted a submar-
ine attack on the French steamer
Radioleine, 65 miles off the Maryland
coast at 9:30 o'clock this morning,
and had found the American schoon-
er,. Edward R. Bard, Jr., in a sinking
rconditionafter having been bombed.
The dispatch was brief, giving no
details of the interrupted attack on
the Radioleine. A later report an-
nounced the arrival of the French
s steamer at an American port. Two
men were rescued from the Bard, a
small coasting schooner of 279 tons.
I U-Boat Reported Off South Carolina
An Atlantic Port, June 4.-The Mall-
s ory line has announced that a coast-
wise freighter, the Sabine, put into
- port here today with a report that
N an unidentified steamer had warned
- her at sea that a German submarine
d was off the South Carolina coast. Be-
r fore the ship docked a flurry of ex-
. citement was caused on the water
- front by the circulation of what had
- appeared to' be an authentic story of
S how she had met and escaped from a
- submarine.
:s Iea, '17E, Falls with Airplane
k Thatcher W. Rea,'17E, while flying
h a airplane at Pensacola, fell into the
e ocean from a height of 500 feet. He
i- escaped with nothing more than a
d cut lip. Rea is a member of Phi Mu

4r Alpha fraternity.
v-
h- U. of Illinois Football Man Killed
n- Carbondale, Ill., June 4. - First
n Lieutenant Ralph Chapman, a former
er captain of the University of Illinois
football team, has been killed in
as France, according to word received.
e- yesterday by his father, R. T. Chap-
man of Vienna.

°621 ph u o * U UoJntI. II"*l al--, ..LV 1.- UICL X,----..

_ 1

m

FINAL CONCERT OF

CLUBS

TONIGHT
8:00--35c

I

f

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