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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 19, 1917 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-10-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

£I ri .VII..4 . Jt 1iH LHIL.YI

NUtS IU
N QdEST ONS

Q. How do I collect the interest?
A. Attached to each bond is an en- COLLEG lTE ALUMNAE TO
graved sheet of interest coupons, one
for each six months' period. When
the interest date arrives, you cut off UI E E T AT DANCE
the interest coupon of that date and
take it to any bank, where it can be FUNDS SECURED TO GO TO UNI-
cashed or deposited. VERSITY UNION AT
Q. How often do I get this inter- PARIS
est?

LIES TO AALL REASONABLE
INQUIRIES ARE IN THIS
ARTICLE
lurean of Publicity, Chiago Lib-
erty Loan District
What is the second Liberty loan
It is a loan of money by the
ile of the United States to their
rgmoent. .
Why does the United States gov-
ient borrow money?
Because we are forced to de-
ourselves against the attacks on
rican honor and American rights
ie German government, and there-
must have money to equip and
tain our army and navy. We
money also to lend to those na-
1 with whom we are making com-
cause in this war. .
Are not the ordinary receipts
ie government from taxes, etc.,
sient to do- this?
No; the ordinary receipts of the
rtment are about one and a quar-
gullion dollars a year, while our
ees of the war for the fiscal year
ig July 1, 1918, will be over $10,-
00,000, not including the money
h we will lend to our allies.
How j is the government going
eise this large amount of money?
By borrowing from the people
by increasing taxes.
When I lend my money to the
ed States government, what do
;in return?
You get a promissory note given
he United States government and?
tng interest. This note is called
end."
What, then, is a United States
rnment bond?
It is the direct and uncondition-
romise of the United States of
rica to pay upon a certain date
scufied sum of money in gold, to-
er with interest at a specific rate,
ble at specifie dates until the
matures, or is called for re-
)tion.
When are bonds of the secold
rty loan dated?
November 15, 1917, is the date
will bear, because that is the
on which they will be issued
he government and the date on
h interest begins,
When will these bonds be paid
ie government; tat is, when will
become due?
November 16, 1942; but the gov-
ent has the right to pay them
time after ten years from date
e bond.
Do I have to hold my bond until
date it is due before I get my
a~r back?
No; you can sell your bond any
you desire. ,There is always a
y market for United States gov-
ent bonds.
How can such a sale be made?
Any bank, trust company, re-
e bond dealer, or broker will be
to sell your bond for you at any
If necessary, could I borrow
y on these bonds?
/Yes; United States government
a are the best security which can
Yered in borrowing money. They
obtain for you the best terms
ble. Ask any bank if you de-
;o borrow money on your Liberty
s.
Do I get any interest on my
y while it is loaned to my gov-
ent?
"Yes; the government will pay
nterest at the rate of 4 per cent
fr.
ss dancing at the Packard Aca-

Monday and Thursday eve-
, 7:30 to 9:30. Private lessons
ppointment. Phone 1850-F1.
IVE US THAT NEXT ORDER FOR
WINDOW CARDS
nd we will deliver the goods
"right on the dot"-

A. Every six months. This inter-
est will be paid to you every May 15
and every November .15 during the
life of the bond.
Q. Is there any way I can collect
my interest without having to cut the
coupons?
A. Yes; you can get the govern-
ment to. give you a "registered" bond;
that is a bond without any coupons
attached and with your name written
on the bond; and each six months, as
the interest falls due, the treasury de-
partment will send you a check in
payment of the interest.
Q. To whom is a coupon bond pay-
able?
A. A coupon bond is payable to
bearer.
Q. To whom is a registered bond
payable?
A. A registered bond is payable to
the person whose name is written on
its face and no other person. A reg-
istered bond can be transferred from
one owner to another by the owner
writing his name on the back of the
bond in the presence of a witness
authorized by the United States treas-
ury department.
Q. If I should sell, my bond, how
shall I transfer it to the new owner?
A. If it is a coupon bond, merely
by delivery. Just hand it to the new
owner.
Q. 'Supposing it is a registered
bond?
A. You must execute the blank
form on the back of the bond in ac-
cordance with directions there given.
Q. Can I lend any amount to the
government and get a bond in return?
A. No; $50 is the smallest amount
that the governemnt will accept in re-
turn for a bond. Coupon bonds are
issued in the following fixed denom-
inations: $50, $100, $500, $1,000, $5,000
and $10,000; registered bonds are is-
sned in fixed denominations of $50,
$100, $500, $1,000, $5,000, $10,000 and
$100,000.
Q. Are Liberty bonds exempt from
taxation?
A. The bonds are exempt, both as
to principal and interest from all taxes
imposed by the United States, any
state or any of the possessions of the
United States, or by any local taxing
authority, except:
(a) Estate or inheritance taxes.
(b) Graduated additional income
taxes, commonly known as sur-
taxes and excess profits or war-
profits taxes now or hereafter im-
posed by the United States on the
income of profits of corporations,
individuals, partnerships, or as-
sociations.
The interest on an amount of bonds
and certificates, not in excess of $5,000
in one ownership, is exempt from the
taxes provided for in clause (b) above.
Q. Does this mean that the bonds
are free from all local taxation?
A. Yes; the local assessor or tax
collector cannot assess these bonds as
personal property.
Q. Is the government likely to of-
fer other bonds for sale during the
war?
A. Yes.
Q. Suppose the government offers
bonds in the future which will pay a
higher rate of interest than 4 per
cent?
A. If so, the holder of a Liberty
bond will have the right to exchange
this bond for the one bearing the high-
er rate of interest.
Q. How can I buy the bonds of,
the second Liberty loan?
A. By filling out an application
blank and handing it to any bank or
trust company, bond dealer or broker,
or to one of the federal reserve banks

or to the treasury department .at
'ashington.
Q. When can this application for
bonds be made?
A. At any time from the first day
of October to the close of business on
tie 27th day of October, 1917.
C. Must the full price of bonds be
paid on application?
A. No; only 2 per cent of the
amount you want to buy is required
when application is made. ,

At a meeting of the board of col-
legiate alumni held yesterday after-
noon it was decided that the board
would serve refreshments at the regu-
lar Michigan Union dance Saturday
night. The money which may be real-
ized from this venture will go to the
support of the Michigan branch of the
American university union in Paris.
This first serving of refreshments is
to be in the nature of an experiment.
If the board is successful, it will prob-
ably undertake to, serve at all of the
Union dances, thus enabling the danc-
ers to refresh themselves without
leaving the building.
The following committee was ap-
pointed at 'the meeting: Mrs. John
Waite, chairman; Miss Elizabeth
Dean, and Mrs. E'ans Holbrook. The
movement is heartily supported by
Dean Myra B. Jordan and by the Union
officials.
"The plan of the board will be a
convenience to the students as well
as a means of supporting the Michi-
gan branch of the American Univer-
sity Union," said Homer L. Heath, '07,
general secretary of the Michigan
Union. "It deserves the hearty sup-
port of all those who attend the
Union dances."
Q. When must the remainder be
baid?
A. In installments as follows: 10
per cent on November 15, 1917; 40 per
cent on December 15, 1917, and 40 per
cent on January 15, 1918.
Q. Can I buy a bond on the install-
ment plan by paying for it weekly or
monthly?
A. The treasury department will
not accept payments in this manner
but many banks and a great many
employers will sell you a bond and
allow you to pay for it in partial pay-
ments. If you desire to pay for your
bonds in this way, consult your em-
ployer or any banker.
Q. When will the subscriber know
how many bonds they will receive on
their subscriptions?
A The secretary of the treasury
will announce this about the 6th of
November, 1917. This is known as
making the "allotment."
Q. Must all subscribers to Liberty
bonds wait until the allotment is made
to know whether or ,not they will re-
ceive their bonds?
A. No; a subscriber for bonds up
to $1,000 is certain to receive his bond.
Q. To whom shall I make pay-
ments?
A. Payments can be made to the
treasury department at Washington
or to one of the 12 federal reserve
banks in cash, by bank draft, certified
check, postoffice money order, or ex-
press company money orders, but s&
scribers are urged to make all p
ments on their bonds to the bank with
whom they placed their subscriptions.
Q. Can a woman own a Liberty
bond as her personal property?
A. A Liberty bond is the personal
property of the purchaser or of the
person to whom the purchaser may
sell or assign it. If it is a registered
bond, the record of its ownership is
a matter of government record. A
Liberty bond is therefore the property
of the woman who buys it until she
disposes of it.
OHIO STATE IS EXPECTING
ANOTHER CHAMPIONSHIP TEAM
Columbus, o., Oct. 18.-Ohio State,
Western conference champions of 1916,
are going to make a strong bid for
titular honors again this year, for
State seems to be fully as strong as
a year ago when they went through
the season without defeat.

The line may be a triffe weaker
than last year, but the backfield built
around the incomparable "Chick"
Harley looks stronger. Team play,'
too, is much more developed than it
was a year ago at this time..
Some idea of the strength of State
may be gleaned from the fact that
she opened the season by giving to
Case the worst defeat in her history
and it must be remembered that Case
has been playing Michigan annually
for more than a decade.
Informal Reception at Harris Hall
An informal reception and dance
was given Wednesday at Harris hall
to Episcopal students. President H.
B. Hutchins, Registrar A. G.. Hall,
Prof. G. W. Patterson, Prof. Mortis
P. Tilley, and other members of the
faculty were present.'
Get her a big yellow "mum" before
the game at the Arcade Floral Shop.

CARS FLINHT DESCRI1E
BY PROMINENT RUSSiAN
FEELING AGAINST FORMER RUL-
ER NECESSITATE' WATCH.-
FULNESS
Harbin, Manchuria, Oct. 18.-The
journey of Nicholas Romanoff, form-
erly emperor of'Russia, from Tsarkoe
Selo to Tobolsk, which was accom-
plished without the knowledge of sol-
diers and civilians along the railway
zone which he passed, is described in
detail by a prominent Russian now in
Harbin, who has personal knowledge
of the secret trip.
Because of the feeling against the
Romanoff family it was not advisable
to use the former emperor's own train.
Instead three ordinary first class
sleeping cars were provided for M.
Romanoff, his family and their attend-
ants. Three hundred soldiers also ac-
companied the party.
The train started from Tsarkoe Selo
very early in the morning of August
15. M. Kerensky, the Russian premier,
personally bade the former imperial
family goodbye.
Five-Day Journey
The journey required five days. All
stops at stations were as short as pos-
sible, and the members of the party
kept concealed while at large stations.
Every evening after dinner the train
stopped for an hour at some wayside
station or remote switch that Nicholas
ands his family might have an oppor-
tunity to exercise. Throughout the
trip he seemed to be in the best of
health, and took an interest in his sur-
roundings. He was extremely agree-
able to all the members of the party.
The former empress, Alexandra
Alix, remained in her apartment
throughout the journey, where meals
were served to her and her son Alexis.
She had the appearance of a woman
suffering from nervous prostration.
All the four former grand duchesses
were in excellent health and seemed
to be in lively spirits every day. All
had their heads shaved, a practice
popular with Russian women today in
order to make their hair grow better.
Little Alexis, although limping slight-
ly, apparently had recovered from his
recent illness. 1
Troops Threaten
At Krasnoyarsk, a Siberian city,
where anarchical agitators hold sway,
the railroad station for three days had
been crowded with soldiers, who were
anxious to capture the imperial family
but when the troops learned where
Nicholas and his family were being
sent, they discontinued their hostile
demonstration.
Tobolsk is the capital of the prov-
ince of the same name, and was form-
erly the ancient capital of old Siberia.
It has been an important refuge for
political exiles for many years, and
Nicholas and his familyare quartered
in a building originally erected for
exiles and recently altered.
Rasputin, the monk who figured
tragically in the downfall of the
Romanoffs, was born in the province
of Tobolsk and erected a monastery
in the capital.

*
*
*

AT THE THEATERS
YOU CAN GO TO-
"Nothing But the Truth," at the
Garrick.
"Flora Belle," at the Whitney
Saturday, Oct. 20.
TODAY
Whitney- "Happy" Lou Whit-
ney and associate players in "Hel-
lo Bill."

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* * * * * * * * * * *

*

Majestic-Vaudeville.

*
*
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*

Orpheum -Jack Devereau in
"The Grafter." Also Triangle
Comedy and Ford.
Wuerth-Vivian Martin in "Lit-
tle Miss Optimist." Also Key-
stone Comedy.

on at Paul's Place, 611 E. Willian
while you wait.-Adv.
Pop. Mat.Wd. in3bE Wk. Oct.I
Best Seats Si AR RI Nights
Sat. Mat. lI 50c to $2.1
2cto $1.50 VDETROIT 5ct 2
2 1WILLIAM COOLIER In
"NOTHING BUT THE TRUTH
By JAMES MONTGOMERY
Rae Theatre . Todas
DUSTIN FARNUM
In **Davy Crockett"
Buy a Rae Ticket Book and Save Mone
ARCADE.
Thurs-Fri-i 8-igMae Marsh in "Polly
of the Circus." 8 Parts. (Fxtra
matinee at 4:30 onl Thurs. )
Sat-20-Lvart Overton in "Soldiers of
Chance," and Comedy, "The Spring
Idyl."*
Mon-22-mrilyStevens in "The Slack-
er." 8 Parts.
Tues-23-la Hall in "The Little Or-
phan," and Charlie Chaplin in "The
Champion"' (New print).
11llIIIII1!lllillilllllllllll 11111lillllil
WuerthTheatre
BOOKINGS FOR OCTOBER
Prices: s cents
Matinees 2, 3:30. Nights 6:30, 8, 9:30
Saturdays-Sundays--Continuous
Thur-Fri-x8- -Vivian Martin in "Little
Miss Optimist." Also Keystone
- Comedy.
Sat,-2o-A. N. Pinero in "Iris." Aso
Serial, "Neglected Wife," No. 7.
Sun-Mon-21-22-Elsie Ferguson in "Bar-
bar Sheep.". Aso Homes 'Travels
andyVictor Moore Comedy.
Tues-Wed-23-24-AII.Star in "Rasputin
= the Black Monk." Also O'Henry;
Story.
Thur-Fri-2 -26-Geo. Beban in "Lost in
Transit." Also Keystone Comedy.

* Rae-Dustin Farnum in "Davy
* Crocket." Musty Suffer Comedy.

* Arcade- Mae Marsh in "Polly *
* of the Circus." *

*

*I

** **** * * * * C* * *

AT THE WHITNEY

Those who like farce comedy will
enjoy a good laugh when Miss Whit-
ney and her associates produce the
laugh producing comedy, "Hello Bill,"
here for the remainder of the week.
This popular. comedy has not been
seen here in recent years and as it
has a touch of the "military" to it, it
should prove doubly amusing. The
comedy is built for laughing purposes
and the characters are natural. Popu-
lar dances prevail.
You can get those Neolin Soles put
on at Paul's Place, 611 E. William,
while you wait.--Adv.
Dancing from 9 to 12 every Satur-
day night at Armory.-Adv.

MAJESTIC
EVE. 7:30-9. 20c, 25o 30c
MAT. 3 P.M. 10o, and 20o
. THURS., FRI. AND SAT.
Hendrix & Belle Isie
"The Schoolmaster"
A Roit of Fun and Laughter
JOHN & WINNIE
HENNINGS
In "The Kill Kare Kouple"
MORRIS & BEASLEX
In "Their Own Idea of Fun"
CLARK & CHAPELLE
in
"The Sales-Lady & the Porter"
rOLEY & MASSINO
In a Unique Novelty
NOTICE: NO MATINEE SATURDAY
Please reserve your seals for night now
SUNDAY
Douglas Fairbanks In
"THE LAMB"

OrpheuimTheatre
BOOKINGS FOR OCTOBER
. Prices: ioc unless otherwise specified
Matinees 2. 3:3o. Nights 6:3o, 8, 9:30
Saturdays-Sundays-Continuous
Fri-T9-Jack Devereau in "The Grafter."
:Also Triangle Comedy and Ford.
Sat-2o-M. Fisher in "Little Girls Who
Wouldn't Grow." Also Mutual Trav-
:els and Comedy.
Sun-21-Jack Gardner in "Men of the
:Desert'." Also "Do Children Count?"
Monrz-ldnaGoodrich in"Rieputa-
venin in
tion."' Also Serial, "Lost Express,"
N No. 3.r
Tucs-23-Charles Ray in "The Clodhap-
per." Also Triangle Comedy,(Re-
*booked). Evening isc.
Wed-2 4Miss Clark in "Miss Geo.
Washsington." Also. Victor Moore
Comedy (Rebooked). Lvening c.
WH'ITNEY
HAPPY LOU
Whitney Stock Co.
2 DA Y STHU. Dci.18
THUR.-FRI.
The Farce Comedy of 1000
Laughs
tH nol Bill
Thin Ones-Fat Ones
LAUGH
and Grow - and Grow
Fat Thin
PRICES 10 -20 - 25e
dD.
l~cMATS.3AT.

I

lw

01' Jupiter Stops
Rac quet Tourney
The weather man seems determined
that there should be no tennis
tournament this year, and to show his
determination he has poured rain on
the courts in such quantities that the
enthusiasts have been afraid to ven-
ture on them for fear of miring.
Since the play started there have
been but two days when the courts
'were in any condition at all to use
and then they were too soft for a ve",
fast set. "The tournament will be
'played,if it takes all winter to finish
it," was the statement made by Mr.
Hamer, '18E, yesterday, but he (lid
not mean by this that the men should
let any good weather go by without
taking advantage of it. On the on-
trary, he desires to get the tournament
over in as short time as possible,
and should any sunny days be allow-
ed to go by, those who have then not
played their match in the first two
rounds, will be taken from the list by
default.
In answer to the question regarding
the play of the new men, Mr. Hamer
said that, while in the past years it
had been the custom for a stranger to
step in and carry off the bacon, he did
not think that any of the new men
'would go to the finals this year. "Of
course,'' said Mr. Hamer, "at this
stage of the game this is more or less
guess work but the younster that
'wins the cup 'this year will have to
play a fast game every minute of the
Xway."

-.
HATTERS TO. COLLEGE MEN
We make and retail hats. Make Hats-to
Order and do all kinds of hat work such as
reblocking, new bands. etc. We also sell and
reblock Army Hats.
Hats shaped to fit the head free of charge
when bought of us.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 Packard St., next to the Delta.
Cor, State and Packard,
THE RIGHT PLACE TO BUY A HAT
Telephone 1792

Week
21,

TWithin the Law"
'The Price She Paid'

WH ITN EY THEATRE
SATURDAY NIGHT, OCT.20
QUEEN OF THE SEASONS MUSICAL SHOWS,

I'

The New York Casino Theatre Brilliant Success

11I1

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i

S&HLINGER
MPT PRINTERS
432-J ' 109-111 E. Washington'

1.A

Cleaning - Pressing - Repairing
Careful Attention paid to ALTERATIONS
Suits Made to Measure $25 upI

50--PEOPLE-Entire New York Productic
Excellent Cast ANCNG Artiste
Music by CHAS. SCHWARZWALD .Book by COSMO HAMILTON
Lyrics by CARL RANDALL Staged by RICHARD ORDINSKI
20-Delightfully Distinctive Musical Hits
Really the Best Girl and Music Show the Casino ever Produce
Prices: 50-75-41.00-41.50 Boxes $2.0
-SEATS NOW ON SALE-

Gansle, Tailor
South Main Street
Opposite MACK & CO.

Shoes repaired while you wait.

o.

q

I

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{ Prices : 40c, 2 for 75c.: Adv.

G. Andres, 222 S. State St.-Adv.

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