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June 01, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-06-01

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THE WEATHER
PROBABLY SHOWERS;
TODAY

AMP
741.
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ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAI AMN1 BillT WIRE
SERVICE

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OL. XXVIII. No. 175. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATVUDAY JUNE 1, 1918. PRICE THREE CENT

WI m nq ICiT IPPCLUBS GIVE LAST
CONCERT JUNE 5

NIGHT CEREMONIES
FRESULHAN CLASS TURNS OUT IN
FULL FORCE FOR LAST
EVENT OF YEAR
PROF. PARKER MAKES
ADDRESS OF EVENING
Judge Chapin, '86, Tell Reminiscences
of 30 Years Ag I Speakmg for
Alumni
(S. IL.)
Though the ranks of the Cap night
celebrators last night were a little
thinner than they were last year, the
characteristic Michigan spirit and
"pep" was in evidence on Observatory
hollow when 3,500 people, including
students, faculty members, and a
number of spectators, witnessed the
last great celebration of the year.
Next to the freshmen, who turned
out with hardly a member of their
class missing, the great attraction
was the Cap night speakers, George
F. Hurley, '18L, for the students,
Prof. John C. Parker, of the engineer-
ing college, for- the faculty, and
Judge William W. Chapin, '86, of De-
troit, for the alumni.
Prof. Parker's Address
The best speech of the three was
the one delivered by Professor Par-
ker. "Michigan, Mother of Men," he
said, "typified the spirit and tradition
of the University. She is the breeder
of men whose outstanding and domi-
nating characteristic is sincerity,
honesty, and the ability to do their

eshmen he said: "Young-
a year of residence here!
to become Michigan men,
higan, Mother of Men. To-
eet you into the Michigan

War Spirit
The spirit of war predominated
throughout most of the speeches.
George F. Hurley, '18L, speaking for
the student body, said: "The present
war that we are now waging for de-
mocracy is the second great crusade
the world has seen against the infi-
del." He spoke of the necessity for
college men returning to the Univer-
sity next year. "Intellect is the only
means by which brute force can be
conqu-ered," he said, "and it is at the
University where you can this need-
ed intellect." His speech was well re-
ceived by the audience.
Judge Chapin Well Received.
Reminiscences of 30 years ago was
the subject of Judge W. W. Chapin,
'86, of Detroit, speaking for the alum-
ni. He created much laughter among
the assemblage with his humorous,
well-told stories. In mentioning the
alumni who he represented, he dwelt
upon their loyalty to Michigan and
the loyalty they were showing to-
wards the country during the present
crisis.
Gordon C. Mack, '18, officiated as
master of ceremonies. A large part of
the program of the evening was made
up by the singing of such college
songs as, "Yellow and Blue," "College
Days," "Goodbye, State Street," and
"Where, Oh, Where" which were led
by Newton C. Fetter, secretary of the
University Y. M. C. A.
Casket Scene
The casket scene, representing the
cremation of the freshman class of
1921, was a feature of the evening's
entertainment. The saving of the
"pots" and toques, and the tradition-
al freshman snake dance, was car-
ried out this year as last.
After the celebration, the old fresh-
men and sophomore classes marched
up State and Main streets and were
furnished with "free movies" by the
Wuerth, Orpheum and Arcade thea-
tres.

The Varsity Glee and Mandolin
clubs will appear Wednesday evening
in Hill auditorium for their final con-
cert for the year.
An entirely new program has been
worked up since the February con-
cert, and the public is promised a
repertoire even better than the mid-
year one. The clubs are bing
rounded into condition for their ap-
pearance and, although they have
lost a number of members, they are
up to the usual high standard.
The sororities on the campus ex-
pressed their appreciation of the
clubs when they went on their an-
nual Spring serenade tour Monday
and Tuesday nights. The general
concensus of opinon was that the
clubs were better than in previous
years.
Tickets will be the same price as
usual, according to the management's
announcement. They are no won sale
at Wahr's, Sheehan's, the Busy Bee,
the Union, the Delta, Schaeberle's,
and the University Music house.
13 SPECIAL STUDENTS
MAY BE DRILLMSTERS
WILL ]U, SENT OVERSEAS OR TO
SOME TRAINING
CAMP
Thirteen men in the first training
detachment were called from the dif-
ferent platoons yesterday afternoon
for special drill under the direction
of Capt. Ralph H. Durkee. Each of
the 13 special University students
will be under the personal supervi-
sion and entirely responsible to Cap-
tain Durkee.
It has been intimated that the men
will probably be sent overseas, or
sent to some cantonment camp, where
they will act as instructors. No defi-
nite statement has been issued, and
the exact status or duties of the men
in this new division is somewhat of a
mystery.
lleii Given Three Drills a Day
Three intensive drills were given to
the men yesterday, and it is probable
that the drill program will, be in-
creased before next week. It is not
known as yet whether the men will
be given the regular periods of work
in the University shops. The follow-
ing men have been picked for this
division:
"Walter F. Krause, Christian L. Ep-
pler, John T. Weber, Alfred E. Good,
John B. Hoy, Thomas L. Brooks, John
E. Weller, William J. Topley, Roger
B. Miller, Roy G. Harter, Henry J.
Schroeder, Arthur Laarus, and Al-
fred Fischer.
Muster Roll Held Yesterday
Muster roll was held yesterday aft-
ernoon. It is customary to hold mus-
ter roll, which is an impressive cere-
mony, one month from payroll, and
one month from the last muster. Ev
ery man falls in line and stands at
attention. When his name is called,
he steps out of line and is question-
ed. Every man must be accounted
for, either by his presence, in line, on
guard, or other duties.
The weekly Friday night smoker for
the men of the first training detach-
ment in Lane hall was postponed last
night on account of the observance of
Cap night. A small number of train-
ing men were present, but it was de-
cided that the smoker had better be
postponed until next Friday.

CADET AVIATOR KILLED AS
AIJWlIANE FALLS 200 FEET
Montgomery, Ala., May 31.-George
H. Lacoske, 26, cadet aviator, was
killed at Taylor field this afternoon,
when his plane went into a nose dive,
falling about 200 feet.
Saginaw, May 31. - Cadet Aviator
Lacoske lived in this city and was a
graduate of the University of Califor-
nia plane school. He enlisted last
December.
Teachers Grafted Salary ncre-ise
Detroit, May 31. - All teachers in
Michigan State Normal schools were
granted salary increases by the state
board of education which met here
today. The high cost of living was
given as the reason for the raise.

UNION CONTINUES
MEMBERSHIPDRIVE
Lick of Interest in $240,00 Campaign
forB Building 31akes Step
Necessary
CANVASSING AMON STUDENTS
TO PROCEED U TI , MODAY
Large Xumber of Students Still to Be
Caniassed; Expect Greater En-
thusiasni
Because of lack of interest evidenced
in the Union membership campaign
for $250,000, it has become necessary
to continue the period of the drive
until Monday. Owing to the time
spent in bringing the Union carni alto
a successful close, many of the solici-
tors were forced to postpone inter-
views with students for life member-
ship subscriptions.
Interest Lacking
A large number of the students have
not yet been canvassed, and results up
to the present do not indicate that, the
quota will be oversubscribed, unless
more interest is shown than before.
Some students, however, have inquir-
ed at the Union office regarding the
acceptance of Liberty bonds as cash
payments on subscriptions, and the
plan has met with decided approval.
Some of the solicitors have reported as
many as twelve subscriptions since the
opening of the campaign.
Allow Few More Ihys
Only a few more days will be allow-
ed for the continuance of the drive,
and students are urged to make out
their subscriptions early. Unless more
interest is shown, the University will
not be able to take care of all the wxar
work during the period of the war,
that the government requires. If the
quota is not subscribed, it will hinder
the Union, the University, and the go-
ernment from taking part in the re-
quisite amount of war work for the
winning of the struggle.
The number of subscriptions yester-
day were 72. With the close of the
carnival, it is expected that greater
interest will be shown in the drive,
both by the students and solicitors.
Final reports on the progress of the
drive are to be made at 50 o'clock
Monday afternoon.
CHOOSE BOYD S EST
ATHLETEAND STUDENT
A1 ARDEID I E A FOR 1917- 8BY
1IC1JW XN 'ATIILETI(' AS-
SOCLV.TION
Alan W. Boyd, '18-'20l, of Indian-
apolis, was yesterday awarded the
medal for being Michigan's best ath-
lete and student for the year 1917-18.
This is the first year the award has
been made by Michigan. It is an an-
nual event with Conference schools.
The medal is given by the Athletic
association, and the naming of Boyd
was done by the board in control of
athletics.
Wires Two " Is"
Boyd has won "M'" in two sports.
In football he has played the positions
of end and guard for the past two
seasons. In both places he was a
tower of streng th on both offense and
defese. Several sports writers plac-
ed him on their mythical All-Ameri-
can, All-western, or Conference teams

at the end of the piast seasOL. has
won two "M's' in football.
Made a sketball ('aptaint
In basketball Boyd has been the
captain and leading defensive p layer
of the first Michigan team. Coach
IMitchell said of him that he was the
equal of any guard in the Conference
last, season.
Boyd has also maintained a consist-
ently high standard in his classes.
The medal will be awarded during
Commencement week. It is gold, one
side picturing an 4athlete, and the
other a student.
The winning of the medal is consil-
ered a high honor in Conference (ir-
cles.
D)ecide Not to Repeat CarnIval Show
There will be no repetition of the
Michigan Union Byphalo Bull Carni-
val today, as was planned. Arrange-
ments could not be made satisfact or-
ily for a second show.

I

FOREIGN STUDENTS
BANQUET TONIGHT
"All four cor ner of the earth" will
be literally represented at the anmal
Cosmopolitan club banquet tonight in
the guild rooms of the Methodist
church, corner of State and Washing-
ton streets.
"Yak che iche?" from the sons of
Russia, will be answered by "Muy Bien,
gracias," from the sunny Spaniards,
while the Frenchman's "Comme vouz
portez vous" will call forth a hearty
"Great, old chap! Ilow are you?"
from the dusky native of Zulu.
President Harry B. 1Hutchins will
be the principal speaker, and will be
followed by Lovisa A. Youngs, '21,
president of the women's chapter of
the Cosmopolitan club, Sotokihi Kat-
snizumi, president-elect of the men's
chapter. I1. Gilbert King, retiring
president, and Acting Dean Agnes I.
Wells.
The dinner will begin promptly at
6:30 o'clock. The public is invited to
at tend.
'8HOUR SIGNAL CURE
OFFERED LIT- STUDENTS
ENGINIEFIN(A COLLEGE A M lES
NE('ESSARY ARRANGENENTS
WITIIDEWAN EFFIlNG~ER
By arrangement with Dean John R.
Effinger, the department of electrical
engineering is prepared to offer the
eight-hour course specified by the
chief signal oficer for literary stu-
dents who have started their work in
general science.
Men who are completing a full
sophomore election may apply to
Iean Eflinger for admission to the
Signal Enlisted Reserve corps if they
have had college algebra and analyti-
cal geometry, and Course I in physics.
It will be necessary for such men to
take mathematics through differen-
tal equations, course II in physics,
electrical engineering II, four hours,
and the eight-hour course in wireless
cominuunication conducted under the
direction of the chief signal officer.
Will Authorize Credit
Dean Elinger will authorize liter-
ary college credit in electrical engi-
neering 11 and in the radio course as
a war measure only. This work can
advantageously be supplemented by
taking both courses in electrical
measurements offered in the physics
department, and by taking Dr. Colby's
course in electron theory.
Literary students electing the
course will not lose their status in
the College of Literature, Science and
the Arts, and are advised and permit-
ted by the chief signal officer to com-
plete the work for their degrees.
Suniinpr Work Advised
Students now in their freshman
year who may wish to be included in
the Signal Enlisted Reserve corps at
the conclusion of their sophomore
year are advised to take work in
mathematics and physics during the
tsmminer session and to continue such
work as rapidly as possible.
Detailed information can be secur-
ed at the offices of Deanth fiffinger,
Prof. John C. Parker of the College
of Engineering, or Secretary Louis A.
Hopkins, of the engineering college.
MY SUMMON 11 YALE MEN FOR
MAKINGR lAISER "MAN OF HOUR'

New Haven. Conn., May 31.-Be-
cause seniors at Yale university
nominated the Kaiser as "the man
of the hour," the department of jus-
tice is (o-0templating summoning 11
of them to exphain their actions.
No action would be taken by the
faculty. President Hadley, of Yale
university, announced last night. le
said he believed that the nomination
was merely a prank on the part of
some of the students.
Call Sauerkraut of Dutch Oright
Wshaingtn, May 31. -- Sauer-
kraut is of Dutch, not German ori-
in, the food administration explained
here today and it maybe eaten with-
out any charge of disloyalty being of-
ferel again'st the person eating it, In
fact, the food administration recom-
mends the consumption f more cab-
bages, in order that more of the sta-
ple articles might be released for use
abroad.

I

U-BOAT TORPEDOESI
SECOND TRANSPORT'
Washington, May 31. - The Ameri-
can transport, President Lincoln,
bound for the United States, was
sunk at 10:40 o'clock this morning by.
a German submarine. The vessel sunk
in an hour.
The following announcement was
made by Secretary Daniels:
"The navy department has receiv-
ed a dispatch from Vice Admiral
Simms stating that the U. S. S. Pres-
ident Lincoln was torpedoed at 10:40
o'clock this morning, and sunk in an
hour. The vessel, was returning from
Europe. No further particulars have
been received."
1eports Mention no Casualties
Though details are lacking, it is
assumed from the fact that the trans-
port was returning to the United
States, that few, if any, troops were
on board. Meager reports, so far re-
ceived, mention no casualty.
The vessel registered 18,072 tons.
It was formerly of the Hamburg-
American line and, with all other
German merchant ships in American
waters at that time, was seized by
the government when the United
States entered the war.
The loss is the second instance of
an American transport to fall victim
of U-boats. Like the President Lin-
coln, the Antilles, torpedoed soon aft-
er the United States began sending
troops abroad, was returning practi-
cally empty to the United States.
APPOINT 15 MORE
SENIORS TO TEACH
Superintendents from various parts
of the state who are constantly select-
ing teachers through the University
department of education have accept-
ed 15 candidates in the past week. A
list of the seniors, with the city in
which they will be placed and the
subject which each intends to teach,
follows:
Yylphia Traviss, English, at Ionia;
IHarold Britton, Latin at Detroit Prep
school, Deroit; Marie Van Westen-
burgge, Latin at Big Rapids; Y. Ei-
lene Lamb, Spanish, at Traverse
City; Floyd A. Barber, science at
Lake Placid, N. Y.; Marion Stowe,
English, at Jackson; Emma Jensen,
Spanish, at Ypsilanti; Mary Fisher,
English, at Jackson; Nellie McGreg-
or, English, at St. Johns; Daphne
Dodds, English, at Jackson; Paul E.
Brown, mathematics, at Muskegon;
Nettie B. Corwin, grades, at Cleve-
land; Leila Pike, English, at Cadil-
lac; Elizabeth McRae, mathematics,
at Houghton; Ethel M. Reese, play-
ground work for the summer at
Wayne.
CALL' V. OF W. SORORITIES
UNDEMOVICRATIC; '15 RESIGN
Fifteen University of Wisconsin
girls, menmbers of four leading na-
tional sororities, have offered their
resignations as a protest against
what they call the "undemocratic fea-
tures" of the sorority system.
It is rumored about the campus
that other girls will follow the prece-
dent set by this group. The action
came as a surprise to the entire stu-
dent body. No evidence of discontent
had previously appeared. The specific
reasons for the step have not been
made public.
Warning Issued to Conserve Weat

Warning was again issued yester-
day by the food administration that
there be no relaxing in the rigorous
conservation of wheat if the neces-
sary shipments are to 1)e made to tie
American fighters overseas and the
Allied peoples.
Will Lecture on "South America"
Mr. H. E. Illick will give an i-
lustrated lecture on "South Amer-
ica" at 6:30 o'clock tomorrow night,
before the Wesleyan Guild of the
Methodist church.

NEW DIV E NEARLY SUPRISE S
HOST SECRECY
"NOTHING IMPORTANT
TO REPORT" - BRITISH
Yanks Make Successful Raid; Greeks
('apt ai 1,500 Prisoners and
War Material
(By The Associated Press)
London, May 31.--"There is nothing
of espeial interest to "report from the
Ba itish front," says the war office
communication issued this evening.
Berlin, via London, May 31.-"On
the front from Noyon to the west of
Rheims, our attack is progressing
favorably," says a German official com-
munication issued this evening.
{creeks Capture 1,500 Germans
London, May 31.-More than 1,500
German and Bulgarian prisoners,
among them 33 officers, and a large
quantity of war materials, have been
captured by Greek troops on the Mac-
adonian front, according to an official
communication received tonight from
Saloniki.
Belrin, via London, May 31-More
than 40,000 men, and far in excess of
400 guns, and thousands of machine
guns, have been taken by the Germans,
according to the German official com-
munication issued today,
Yanks 'Make Successful Raid
Washington, May 31.-A successful
American raid was made today in the
Woevre sector, in which the enemy's
advance positions were destroyed,
and losses inificted in killed, wounded,
and prisoners, is reported in General
Pershing's evening communique.
(By The Associated Press)
London, May 31, The Germans, in
the Campaigno offensive in France,
have now reached the right bank of
the river Marne on a 10-mile front, ac-
cording to a statement given to the
Associated Press today by the Brit-
ish general staff.
Rheims Still Holding Out
The statement says that the Ger-
mans had not entered Chapeau Thier-
ry, but that they are attacking heav-
ily there, and up to the uorthward.
The announcement, which is said to
express the opinion of the general
staff, continues
"The situation around Rheims is not
quite clear, but if it is not already
lost, it seems likely it must fall very
soon.
"Yesterday the French were driven
back to a line from Noyon to Sos-.
sons.
ihrms Attempt to Widen Wedge
"A new development is the Ger-
man attempt to extend their attack to
the east of Rheims, where they were
reported to be attacking last night,
But no further details have yet been
received.
"The situation is a very serious one.
Not only have the Germans made such
rapid progress (an advance of 26
miles in four days) but also because
they still have such large reserves
available to be thrown into the battle
at any point.
Allies Transfer Troops
"Our transfer of reserves has work-
ed very well, and there is reason to
believe the Germans will not make
any further progress, although the
situation must remain anxious as
long as they have plenty of reserves
The immediate future depends upon
what course the enemy takes. The
crown prince has used up virtually all

his reserves, and some of the army
group to the eastward, but the great
bulk of German reserves are to the
(Continued on Page Six)
Wamits Kitemhin to Retract Statement
Washington, May 31. - Secretary
McAdoo has called upon Representa-
tive Kitchin, of North Carolina, to re-
tract his assertion in a recent speech
that a publishers lobby working for
tlhe appeal of the zone system of in-
creasing postage rates influenced the
decision of the administration to in-
sist upon revenue legislation at this
session of congress.

FOUR DAY BATTLE GIVES TEUTONS
28 MILES1; CROWN PRINCE EMPLOYS
RESERVESI RHHEIMS STILL INTACT

- _- -

rls Advised on Juidor Play
J. R. Brumm talked to soph-
iris yesterday afternoon con-
the Junior Girls' play for
11 manuscrips in competition
submitted by the end of Oc-'
nd nust be written in full. A
play containing many lyrics
'able.
more girls who can write mu-
yrics are asked to communi-
h Laura Peacock, '20.

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