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May 31, 1918 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-05-31

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

T r tF MICI IGAN~ DAILY

-

f

If you want

A Cam paign Hat
of distinctive quality
Buy a Stetson

Wadhams, & Co.

State Street Store

.

fit
(

SUJITS (LEANEI) TO SUIT
When we return your clothes dry
cleaned we want you to examine them
critically. If they are satisfactory
kindly do us a good turn with your
friends. If by any chance they should
not be entirely satisfactory send us
word and we'll call for them and
make them right. We guarantee sat-
isfaction.

ANN ARBOR STEAM
DYE WORKS

U C,

_.._.. .

I -1

SILK SHIRTS

AND

)IES CLOTHES
e give special attention
All laundered by hand

FOR
EVERYTHING
ELECTRICAL
No Job too Small or too Large
ASHTENAW
ELECTRIC SHOP
"The Shop of Quality"
If It's not right we make it right
-PIIONE 273-

0lo laundry
PHONE 2355

I

ABANINS SAVED FROM
STRING BY ITALINS
IH ANDAGi VIRTUALLY I)S.AP-
EmAS FROM WAR TORN
COBNTRY
Rome, May 30.-The Italians are do-
ing in Albania exactly what Americans
did in the Philippines in helping and
uplifting a population in need of uid-
ance encouragement, General George
Scriven, military attache at the Am-
erican embassy, said to an Associated
Press correspondent, upon his return
from a journey of five weeks through
that part of Albania, which has been
occupied by the Italians.
Italians Furnish Food
"Had it not been for the work of the'
Italians there, the soor Albanians
would have starved," General Scriven
said. "The Italians have given these
people- food, employment, education,
and security. Wheat, coin and rice
have been imported into the country
and the foodstuffs have been distribut-
ed free to the indigent and sold at
reasonable prices to those who could
afford to pay for it. Experimental'
farms have been opened, schools have
been instituted and, most imporant of
all, courts of justice which hitherto
had been unexistent in the country'
have been established and Albanian
judges placed at their heads when-
ever possible.
Work One of (Ciiizaion
"Although the Italians are fighting
the Bulgarians and the Austrians on
the frontiers, th'e work there is not a
work of war but one of civilization,
and the ground there is most favor-
able to such work for the reason that
the Albanian is an honest man of good
character, possessing the primitive
virtues of courage, truthfulness, and
activity. He has the highest respect
for women, who can travel from one
end of Albania to the other alone
without being molested.
"riganda e Disappears
"Brigandage has virtually disap-
peared fronm Albania, and the Alban-
ians welcome the Italians as benefact-
ors and friends. Several hundred
miles of beautiful, durable roads have
been built, tunnels, bridges and rail-
ways have been constructed. Nine
piers have been erected in Valonal
harbor and eight in Santa Quaranta.
Barracks, and hospitals containing
4,000 beds, have been established, In
order to have the practice of burying
the dead in the center o the villages
discontinued, cemeteries have hen
created in the outskirts of villages and
towns. Telegraphic, telephonic and
wireless stations have been establish-
edl and the Italians are now engaging
in reclaiming the marshy zone sur-
riounding V alona and comprising about
6,000 acres.
With College
Contemporaries
The alumni of Ohio State university
presented the university with a ser-
vice flag containing 2,640 stars on Bac-
calaureate day. A presentation song,
composed by an alumnus expressly for
this occasion was sung by the combin-
ed glee clubs.
Cap night at the University of Wis-
consin will not be held on the cam-
pus this year because of the recent
quarantine of that portion of the cam-
pus heretofore used. The yearlings
will meet at Camp Randall for the cel-
ebration.

Students at the University of Wis-
consin took 2,250 tickets in two hours
time for the address to be given by
Colonel Roosevelt Thursday.
The board of deans of the University
of Washington have moved the sched-
ule for final examinations ahead four
days in order to afford the students
more time for preparation.
The University of Oregon is consid-
ering the plan of establishing a girls'
band in view of the evident dec'ease
of men next year available for the
customary university band.
x Sixteen men and 13 women received
the degree of bachelor of journalism
at ae University of Missouri at their
commencement this yoar.

200 E. -Wasihigtit
Ann Arbor

117 Nkarl
Ypsilanti

BEAN CONSUMPTION RGED
NFIA S T E R ' S 1EA N C R O P S H O W S
(IIEAT ImC"I'A SE OVER
N RML CROP
Owing to the necessity of watching
the meat supply of the country with
increasing care, the possibilities of
beans in the diet are -b-ought again to
the front.
Farmers in the United States last
year brought out a larger crop o
beans than ever before, according to
the figures of the department of agri-
culture. The last crop of beans was
about 15,000,000 bushels, an increase
of 5,000,000 bushels over the normal
crop. Because of the demand for
beans in the army and navy, this crop
has not been too large, and only 'un-
usual circumstances are used to ex-
plain the fact that any beans were left
over.
Beans Have Food Value
deans have long been a staple food
for the army and navy. On account
of their high nutritive value they enter
largely into the diet of men in the
field. Knowing this, Americans have
for some time felt that it was a part
of patriotism to leave white beans
for the soldiers. But the food admin-
istration now merges the use of all
beans.
Beans are to be counted as a substi-
tute for meat rather than for the ce-
reals. They can well take the place of
a meat dish on many occasions. With
them in the diet there is less need for
mneat.
As with everything else in the food
line., the prices of beans have ad-
vanced materially since the beginning
of the war. Americans who had been
accustomed to look upon beans as a
cheap food were somewhat discour-
aged by the increase -in price. Lately
the price of beans has tended to fall
from the high point of last winter.
Even at the high price beans are
among the cheapest foods in nutritive
value.
In calorie value one pound of beans
is equal to over five pounds of pota-
toes, one and one-half pounds of sir-
loin steak, two pounds of round steak,
one and one-half dozen eggs, five
pounds, or five pints, of milk. The
protein value of beans runs in the
neighborhood of 22 per cent, soy beans
run as high as 46 per cent. With
beans at 20 cents a pound, one cup
of bean soup costs about a fifth of a
cent and provides 184.76 calories.
Take Place of Meat
Boston baked beans have taken the
place of meat in certain meals for a
large section of the country for many
years. They have become an institu-
tion. ean loaf skillfully made can
hardly be told fromn meat loaf, and
there is little difference in nutritive
value.
The farmers have done their share.
The distributors are sufficiently stock-
ed with beans. hlere is a way in
which people can serve the cause of
conservation and encourage the plant-
ing of a good crop for the coming year.
However adequate the supplies of
beans may be now, the American peo-
ple must not suppose that the place
of beans in the world's dietary will do
anything but enlarge as the war goes
on.
NA1VERSITY MEN ARE OFFEREI)
POSITIONS BY DETROIT FIR
"If you have any young men who
can be developed on any of the num-
erous machines in our plant or fill

any of the dozen different positions
we have open for intelligent American
men, we can use them and would be
extremely glad to have them enter
our service. They must have a clean
record and be American born, and be
willing to work steadily so that we
can depend on them for the work as-
signed."
This statement is taken from a let-
ter recently received at the engineer-
ing college from the lAncoln Motor
company, of Detroit. Many similar
letters are being received by this col-
lege, requesting university men dur-
ing vacation to employ themselves in
such pursuits.
Detailed information concerning pos-
itions which must be filled by college
men this summer may be gained by
consulting Prof. L. M. Gram, room
322, Engmieering building.

FRESH
FRESH
FRESH
FRESH

STRAWBERRI ES
PEACHES
PINEAPPLES
CHERRIES

Calkins
Drug
Co*

Men's Furnishings
Varsity Toggery Shop
1107 S. University Ave.

The little
Vest Pocket Kodak
is still the most popular mode
Have you seen the new F 6.A
at $20.00 Come in.

"SnappyNew."

Fountain of Youth
Corner State and Liberty
YOUR SPRING SUIT
will be carefully tailored of the new de-
pendable fabrics.
New Models distinctly our own.

eckties a

r.

GOLF SUITS

RIDING BREECHE

'I1

TRY OUR FRESH FRUIT SUNDAES-

'j

A

hON OM
o accompanied by 'good
ient, and depends on
EUVICE not Price
SURTIS
TIRES

Your
Personal
appearance

D. E. Grennan
The Custom Tailor b606 E. Liberty
n~ Wahod

6,000 miles of service
kTIS TIRE &w
RUBBER CO
[uskegon, .Mich-.

will be most pleasing when
clothed in a suit made
by
A. F. Marquardt
516 IL William St.
Phone 1422-J

speial'

I'_

Try our Chop Suey
Chinese and American Dishes

Unusual offern o suitings, ging-
hams, and voiles for girls' summer
frocks and dresses. The following
are only a few of the many specials.
50c voile in plain colors, stripes, and plaids, 36 in. to
46 in. wide,
I 39c per .yard.

lary R Fountain Pens
i NNhF N IS es EI6Ry 'IBdY Waterman
121 and ConKlin
U. of M. Jewelry.
landerer & Seyfried

WAI KING LOG
Joe Gin, Prop.

314 S. State St.

Phone 1244-M

MILITARYNEWS
Travelling orders will be issued to-
day at the R. 0. T. C. office in the Nat-
ural Science building to the 221 ca-
dets recommended for the Fort Sher-
idan summer training camp. Every
cadet who is certain that he cannot
attend the camp is requested to noti-
fy the military authorities today. An
additional list of alternates will be
issued tomorrow, provided a number
of the men notify the office of their
inability to be present at Fort Sher-.
idan on June 3. The fare will be paid
by the cadets, and after their en-
trance in the camp, it will be refund-
ed at the rate of three and one-half;
cents a mile. The government will;
also pay the return fare, at the same

rate, at the completion of the course,
July. 3.
Motion pictures will be taken of
the cadets, while they are going
through various military formations,
at 4:15 o'clock this afternoon on Fer-
ry field, provided that the weather is
favorable. Several still pictures will
also be taken of the cadets. Lieut.
d(ts to wear their uniforms.
Gregory Urges Speen in [. S. Courts
Washington, May 30.-Speeding up
justice by holding federal courts in
continanous session and giving immed-
iate trials to persons charged with
violating war stautes is urged by At-
torney General Gregory in instructions
to United States attorneys.
Attorneys were told to confer with
federal judges in an effort to have
grand juriep constantly ready for- call
and to keep trial jurors available at
all times.

50c suitings, tan with colored figures,
39c per yard.

89c suitings, white with colored figures, 36 in. wide,
69c per yard.
One lot of tissue ginghams, 27 in. wide, in all light
fashionable shades and unusual patterns. Regular 29c
value,
25c per-yard.

,r r

45c jap-crepe in stripes and plains for skirts, dresses
and men's shirts, 30 ,n. wide,
37c per yard.

"1

Leave Copy

.Af lVFIE

Leave Copy
at
Students'
Supply Store

There should be a Victrola in
every home
Hoop about yours?
Prices from $20.00 to $400.00
MAKE,YOUR TERMS

u
DIVI
rm-l

45c colored foulards in dots and stripes, 30
37c per yard.
35c ginghams, plain colors, stripes, checks
27 in. wide,
29c per yard.

and plaids,

in. wide,

LOST
)ST-On Washtenaw Ave., between
Rill St. and Cambridge Road, a gold;
bar pin with opal set in diamonds.
Fidr" leas * return to 1722 Ca-n

FOR SALE
FOR SALE--A good trunk, cheap, at
810 E Washington. Phone 1165-M
FOR SALE-Let us be your sales
agent. It is our specialty.

Alp
40000

GRINNELL BROS., 116 S. Main St.

I

"S

SI

FE

MIN

4'

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