100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 30, 1918 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-05-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THUR

_ .x..._ . - . _ .. _ w..... _ . .

MEMBER ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled
to the use for republication of all news dis-
p tlhes credited to it or not otherwise credit-
ed in this paper and also the local news
publlished herein.
Oficial -newspaper " at the University of
Michigan. Published every morning except
Monday during the university year.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor as
second-class matter.
Ofsces:Ann. Arbor Press Building.
Phones: Business, g6o; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed Soo words,
if signed, the signature not necessarily to ap-
pear in print but as an evidence of faith, and
notices of events will be published in The
Daily at the discretion of the Editor, if left
at the office or in The Daily notice box in
the main corridor of the general library where
he notices are collected at 7:30 o'clock each
evening.
All unsigned communications will receive no
consideration. No manuscript will be returned
unless the writer sends postage for that pur-
pose..
Robet T. McDonald.......Managing Editor
Harold Makinson........Business Manager
James Sichermerhorn, Jr......Sports Editor
Clarence L. Roeser........Telegraph -Editor
Margaret H. C oley........Literary Editor
Paul E. Cholette....Publication Manager
Bernard Wohl ......Circulation Manager
NIGIHT EDITORS
Russell C. BarIes D Walter R. Atlas
Charles R. Osius, Jr. Mark K. Ehlbert
William W. Fox Philip Sloovitz
namesR. McAlpine Paul A. Shinkman
REPORTERS
Milton Marx Robert C. Angell
Frances Broene K. Frances Handibo
,Louise Irish Samuel [amport
Vincent H. Riorden Cecelia Fohey
Vera Brown Marguerite Clark
Ralph N. DuBois Roberta L. Berry
David B. Landis Ethan A. Scholnick
Edna L. Apel Rilla A. Nelson
BUSINESS STAFF
W. A. lLeitzinger Harry D. Hause
Earl H. Cress Katherine Kilpatrick
Francis H. Case Frances H. Macdonald
Hlenry Witing 'II Agnes Abele
George A. Cadwell, Jr. L. A. Storrer
Lambert Hirsheimer Frank N. Gaethke
THURSDAY, MAY 30, 1918.
Night Editor-Frances M. Broene
ENLIST FOR THE SUMMER
There was a time when men felt
constrained to volunteer for service in
the army to demonstrate their real pa-
triotlsm. The draft law, however, has
done away with that necessity, bt it
has left to the undrafted man a more
rigid test of his patriotism.
This summer there will be work that
must ba done, hard work, and some of
it disagreeable. But it must be done.
Its demand is as imperative as that
of the army and navy. In truth, it
underlies the very existence of these
branches. Yet there are scarcely
enough men to do it.
There is not the glory in every day
labor that there is in soldiering. There
is danger to a soldier, and consequent
public honor, and applause to the un-
iform. But overalls bring scant cheers
for the man who does not need to
wear them. To do this necessary work,
as a volunteer without the satisfaction
of receiving public recognition, in-
tead of spending energy in the pur-
suit of idleness-this is the acid test
of patriotism.
That one's brother is in the army,
or that one will be there himself, is
not an excuse. Patriotism is a matter
of today, not of tomorrow.
The reculting offices are open now-
at every farm agent's office, at every
shipyard, and at every liberty factory.
Enlist today.
HIT THE EXAMS HARD
This year the final examinations are
being given under conditions never
before experienced at Michigan. The
great number of students leaving for
the service has necessitated two sets
of finals, the one for those withdraw-
ing from the University, and the other

for those who remain. In both cases
it is hard for the faculty and unjust
for the student.
The finals for the men about to en-
ter the army or navy are given at short
notice, and leave little or no time for
preparation. The fact that they will
soon be fighting for democracy de-
tracts from their energy and concen-
tration.
The men who remain for the regular
examinations are in no frame of mind
to take them. A great many arescon-
templating enlisting during the sum-
mer, their college work being of little
consequence. Their heart and soul
is in the war.
Under these circumstances it is dif-
ficult tc stick to the job and complete
the year. But the harder the student
prepares for his finals and the higher
he passes them, the more efficient he
will be when called to serve his coun-
try.
THE COLLEGE LUCKY PENNY
Many forms of recognition for the
war-work of American college stu-

dents have been proposed and adopted
-from the granting of academic de-
grees to the printing of special groups
of names in commencement programs
and college catalogues. Tho Bulletin
has been in sympathy with the Harvard
authorities in the position they have
taken, that academic work is one thing
and military service quite another, and
that the same recognition is not appro-
priate to both. Far less formal than
any of the usual tokens by which the
colleges have expressed, or proposed
to express, their appreciation of what
their sons have done in the war is a
plan of recognition pursued by the
University of Minnesota.
It is none other than to send to ev-
ery past and present member of the
university in active military or naval
service, or serving abroad in one of the
recognized forms ofaauxiliary service,
a small medal-a sort of pocket-piece
or lucky penny - on which appears
the name of its holder anda few words
testifying to the university's apprecia-
tion of what he is doing for his coun-
try. The cost of each token is only
about 30 cents. A coin of the same
character was carried by Minnesota
men in the Spanish war, and proved
a token of association highly valued
at the time and ever since.
There are few good id'as which oc-
cur everywhere simultaneously. here
is one which loses none of its value
for Harvard and other colleges be-
cause they did not happen to thing of
it first. We do not undertake to sug-
gest the precise method of making it
applicable to the Harvard men in ser-
vict; but the necessary machinery,
utilizing perhaps the home addresses
of men in service, perhaps the agency
of the American University Union in
Europe, perhaps 'both, does not seem
to lie beyond the inventive power of an
individual or group of men to whom
the idea of giving to every Harvard
fighter a tangible emblem of his uni-
versity, to be carried into whatever
danger, may appeal. Should it fall
into the hands of the enemy, it could
suggest only the quality of the backing
that is behi:n'd so many Americans.-.
The L ard Aluni 13 lletin.
Those Yanks, the same being that
class of people which the Germans
said "won't fight," are merely taking
a town here and another one there and
then being content with annoying the
Huns generally.
Of course the team had to come back
to town unexpectedly and thereby un-
knowingly forego the celebration and
all 'the nice things which would have
been said about it last night.
From what we have heard about
how various people are to spend Mem-
orial day the faculty may be expect-
ed to reap a harvest on low marks
about Friday.
The fact that Michigan twice con-
quered the man said by many to be
the best pitcher in the Conference
won't weaken the title of the Wolver-
ines a bit.
With the byphalo in.town, the Con-
ference title reposing in the city, and
a holiday today -- what more, what
more?
K. C. Baker Returns from Sumatra
K. C. Baker, '12, is in Ann Arbor on
business for the United States rubber
company. He has just returned from
Sumatra where he has been working
for the company on one of its rubber
plantations.
Use The Daily Classified columns.

w r ,

CARYATIIJ

Drink to M Oinly-
Jewell Carmen is appearing at the
Maj. in "The Girl with the Champagne
Eyes." Why tantalize us like this,
Jewell?
Se C(ouldn'thave 1Yate'r oit i'he Kiee.
It Vouldn't t y Thl'iere
The Oriental retainer with his three
bendings and nine knockings gets no.
more exercise than the patriotic news
force who endeavor to pound the keys
while the Varsity noise team in the
S. of M. next door wants to know if
we can see what so proudly we hail-
ed at the twilight's last gleaming.
Sports headline- "Detroit Cannot
Win Without Making Hits."
Neither can we swim without water.
Disgusting Deaths -- Hydrophobia
from the bite of a mad flea.
We Won't Dispute You, Brother
Cary:-I am not one of those who
quote the Bible to prove that he war
is going to end in September or that
the world is coming to an end next
January 15. But listen to what the
good book has to say ahout the aridity
of the present Michigan climate. It's
in Numbers 21-29: "And from thence
to Beer that is the well whereof, the
Lord said unto Moses 'Gather the peo-
ple together and I will give them
water'." Descriptive, isn't it ?
Did you ever know a pacing at.
1
Maynard street boasts one and if the
byphalo needs an understudy we'd ad-
vise the Union to go around with a
contract.
Ife's leard SovIt, inia' Siiet inme
About Extracting Blood From a
Boulder
Secretary Smith proved his financial
acumen when he put the last day for
the payment of the diploma fee after
the first of the month.
The Hun militarist party obSErves.
that "the Americans won't fgt " They
were probably just kidding when thcey
took Cantigny.
Forestry Iustructors Eno into Service

n accoun of rain the challenge
a ad scplOmtOrO girls has been postpon-
ed until 4 o'clock tomorrows afternoon.
The game will be plyed in the hieldl
a-mis from 1ar1bour gymnasium.
The larger farm unit has been clos-
ed and further registration in this
unit will be impossible.
Prof. J. R. Brumm, of the rhetoric
departmen, will talk to sophomore
girls on the subject of the Junior girls'
play at 4 o'clock tomorrow afteruoon,
in larbour gymnasium.
Runing th9 e Scale
Lucy M. Cannon, '13, violin pupil of
Mr. Samuel Lockwood of the Univer-
sity School of Music, and Lucille M.
Colby, 'A8, piano pupil of Mr. Albert
.ockwood, will give the first gradna-
ti.n 'e 1 of thle seamon at S o'clock
Saturday evening, June 1, in Frieze
Memorial hall.
Tre public is cordially invited to
listen to the following program:
Sonata, C minor, op. 45 ........Grieg
Lucy M. Cannon
Prelude and Fugue, No. 5...... Bach
Two Etudes ............... Scriabin
Turkish March, Beet hoven-Rubinstein
Lucile M. Colby
Romance, 0, Op. 40....... Beethoven
Albumblatt ....,.. Wagner-Wilhelmj
ii ung 2arian Rhapsody, Op. 43, Ilauser
Miss Cannon
Etude Symphoniques .....Schumann
Miss Colby
Polonaise Brilliant, Op. 211.....
. .................Wieniawsky.-
Miss Cannon
Rhapsody, Op. 119, No. 4 .....Brahms
Intermezzo, Op. 119, No. 3 . . Brahms
Caprice espagnole...... Moszkowsky
Miss Colby
A concert composed of advanced
students of the violin and piano de-
part in Et gave an interesting nis
cellaneous pr'ogrami yEst '(rday after-
non at the School of 1-luie.
Those appearing on the progr;ami
were: Iorothy Haymaker, Ilelen
iarsha 1, U race Smith, Mildred Van

SrsHear Ye!HearYe!
IT IS TIME TO LEAVE YOUR ORDER FOR

Cards

SAMPLES OF CORRECT AND UP-TO-DATE
ENGRAVING NOW IN

UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORE

We Sell

Come in and see the 75 watt Blue Lamp

Gives a white light.

Just the thing to study by

I It

y
i
I
!:
'

H.- Lo SWITZER CO.,-
iliaryBooks
For
Fort Sheridan
raing camp
The Slater Book Shop

i

morning. The wedding of the coulel
has been set for high noon, June
12, at St. Andrew's Episcopal church.

is a
Miss Simpson is a
Epsilon soroity.

memer of Mu Phi

a
.

- DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(May 14, 1918)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-7:25 a.
m., 8:16 a. im., and hourly to 7:10 p. n., 8:1G
Jackson Express Cars (local stops west of
Apr Arbor) -8: jsa. in., and every two hours .
to 9 ;.iS 1 . In.
Local Cars East Bound-5:35 a. m., 6:40
a. In., 7:05 a. in. and every two hours to 7:o
p. In., 9::o p. I., 10:30 p. In. To Ypsilanti
only, 8:o5 p. in., 11 :5v p. I., 12:o20 a. m.,
r a1. in., and to Salmie, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-6 :oo a. Mn., 7:48
a. an., 1 o :.ao P.in., 12a:20 a. n,.
e.

Mr. Russell Watson, instructor in Amberg, Mildred Sutton, Marjory
forestry, has gone to Washington to Wet '21. Luclle Colby, '18, and Ai-
report to the United States forestry j meei Renkes '20.
service bureau. He will be sent out iss Nora Crane iunt, director of
from there to locate different species the Unversity Girls' glee clubs, will
of wood to be used for war pur- give a students' recital hursday
poses. evening, June 6, at her home at .11
Prof. P. S. Lovejoy will leave the South Fifth street.
latter part of the week for the same
service. i n' gm A o ld
_ _ _ _Announcemi nt was made of the en-
Our Merchant advertisers represent gagenent ol Mabelle i. Simpson,,
the progressive business men of Ann Sch. of M., to Clarenee E. Cheney,
Arbor.- Adv. '1aE, at a breakfast given Sunda

.
s}
{,, .,
I.. r

a

.
s_ f
,

r
s4
j
R
&~ 7
Copyrightfurt SclarffnurMn ra

r

The Ann Arbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $550,000.00.
Resources .........$4,000,000.00
Northwest Cor. Main & Huron.
707 North University Ave.
SWAIN has the Finest
Photo'graphic collection of An'n
Arbbr Views. See it.
713 East University

T.

I

Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.

I

L _.

AT ARMORY

THURSDAY, IMAY

I

Dancing 9 to 1

Tickets at Busy Bee

PIE -A-LA-MIODE
L.UNCHES and SODDAS
TYPE'VRITERS
Toile andl Vent
iflinieograpliing
Fraternity and Social Stationery
0. l. M!1RRILL
322 South State Street
Your every'Bank-
ing need fulfilled- at

Music by ttIke" Fisher's Jazz Band

I

..

t

I

I

16 PRODUCING OIL WELLS

I

4,600 ACRES OF OIL LEASES
PAYING 1% CASH MONTHLY DIVIDENDS
MODERATE CAPITALIZATION
gives you some conception of the soundness, stability and unusual value of
Invader Oil and Refining Co. Stock
This company requires more capital to drill more wells, which, in turn,
means greater profits to stockholders.
We strongly recommend the purchase of the stock at $6 per share.

Hart Schaffner &(Ax
spring suits and top coats are
more snappy than ever this
spring; the kind of clothes red-
blooded young men will be
wearing. They have incorporat-
ed in them all the style tenden-
cies that will be popular.
We have bought freely and as
a consequence offer you choice
of a stock unequalled for rich-
ness of choice and variety of
style, anywhere but in their
shops. You will find here
clothes as good as you can buy
in any city, and the price is
more reasonable.

Farmers & Mechanics Bank

101-105 So. Main

330 So. State St.
(Nickels Arca(e)

I

WARt SAINGS STAMPS
ISSUED SY TH~E.
UNITED STATES~
GOVERNMENT

Forshee and Kueb nle
PHONE 808 412 FIRST NATIONAL BANK BLDG.

New neckwear, Steson and
Knox Hats.
,sile, Conly, Fegel & COm
The Big Home of Hart Schaff-
ner and Marx Clothes, at South-
west Corner Main and Washing-
ton Streets.

Try our-
HOME-MADE
Candies
They are both delicious and
Wholesome
MADE AND SOLD AT
The SUGAR BOWL
Phone 967 109 S. Main St

i

IJ

1918

FREH }STRAWBERR

TENNIS BALLS

SUNDAES

4

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan