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October 19, 1917 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-10-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY, OCTOBE 19,

MEMBER ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitlea
to the use for republication of all news dis-
patches credited to it or not otherwise credit-
ed in this paper and also the local news
publjshed herein.
Official newspaper at the University of
Michigap . Published every morning except
Monday during the university year.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor as
second-class matter. ,
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building. Sub-
scriptions : by carrier, $2.50; by mail, $3.00.
Want ad stations: Quarry's; tudents' Sup-
ply Store; The Delta. Phones: Business, 96o;
Editorial, 24x4.
Communications not to exceed 300 words
in length, or notices of events will be pub-
lished in The Daily, at the discretion of the
Editorif left at the office in the Ann Arbor
Press Bldg., or in the notice box In the west
corridor of the general library, where the
notices are collectedrat 7:30 o'clock each
evening.
Robert T. McDonald.......Managing Editor
C. Philip Emery.........Business Manager
News Editor..............Harry M. Carey
City Editor.. ........C. S. Clark, Jr.
Sports Editor......James Schermerhorn, Jr.
Telegraph Editor.........Bruce A. Swaney
Telegraph Editor...........Bruce I. Millar
Associate Editor.............Philip C. Pack
Women's Editor ........Mildred C. Mighell
Literary Editor ........Margaret H. Cooley
Efficiency Editor......Albert E. Horne, Jr.
Harold Makinson....... Advertising Manager
Paul E. Cholette.......Publication Manager
Bernard Wohi.........Circulation Manager
Harold R. Smith..........Credlit Manager
Wm. M. LeFevre............Office Manager
J. Ellsworth Robinson.. Subscription Manager
NIGHT EDITORS
Herbert G. Wi k.on Clarence L. Roeser
M1ark I:. Ehlbert

grsboosted $1,000000,
groans.
Let's make him sick.

Kaiser Bill

AOCTECOOPTHINKS "MEATLESS"R D A Y S L A
- DYS WILLBOOST WAR WORK
SHOULD B E OBSERVED B Y ~_
ALL. PLANS FOR ESTABLISHING AN IN-
Editor, The Michigan Daily: FIRMARY FOR GIRLS

BOO

KS

Your first duty today is to buy a
bond, unles you have already done so.
Dean Myra B. Jordan will give her
reception to the girls of the junior
class at 4 o'clock this afternoon in
Barbour gymnasium. The junior rep-
resentative to the judiciary council
will be elected.
Women's ieague ooard of directors
will meet at 9 o'clock tomorrow morn-
ing in Barbour gymnasium.
Houses wishing to pledge a certain
number of hours of work a week at
the Angell house, communicate with
Jean Maclennan, '19, phone 627.
The first balcony of Hill auditorium
i reserved for women at the mass
meeting tonight.
CITY CHURCHES JOIN IN
UNION MEETING SUNDY

'

Starting with the first of October,
the Michigan state food administration
requested the pepole of the state to
observe Tuesday as a "meatless" and
Wednesday as "wheatless" days.
These days were het aside in accord-
ance with the national food conser-
vation plan.
Since this request was made, I'
have endeavored to find out to what
extent the boarding houses and frat-
ernities have been co-operating. From
inquiries and personal obseveration I
have found that at least eight of the
larger boarding houses are not ob-
serving this request. On the other
hand, the majority. of the fraternity
houses seem to be carrying out the
plan.
Many students wish to observe these
days, but are unable to do so. While
many boarding houses serve rye br 'ad
regularly, the quantity is usually in-
sufficient. As a specific example, last
Wednesday the writer attempted to
obtain rye bread in place of wheat
bread in one of the boarding houses,
but was informed that the supply had
been exhausted. In another boarding
house the "wheatless" day was inaug-
urated by serving "Cream of Wheat"
and toast for' breakfast.
While it undoubtedly is a problem
to arrange attractive dishes without
these staples the newspapers and
magazines are publishing many sug-
gestions for preparing meals without
them. .
Possibly the boarding house keepers
are holding back because they are not
sure of student sentiment in this re-
gard and would gladly co-operate if
they were sure that their boarder
would stand behind them in this mat-
ter. In any case, students who are
anxious to serve the national cause
should assure their boarding house
keepers of their support.
A SENIOR ENGINEER.

ABANDONED

The Association of Collegiate
Alumnae will devote all its time and
energy to war work during the en-
.suing club year.
This decision was made at the first
meeting of the year, held last Satur-
day. It was deemed advisable by the
many attending members, to drop, for
the present, the question of establish-
ing an infirmary for University girls,
on account of the urgent necessity for
war relief work at this time.
The association plans to direct its
efforts in particular to the University
union of Europe, an organization
which seeks to provide home-like sur-
roundings for soldiers off duty from
American universities and colleges.
To this end, the association wishes
to raise a considerable amount of
money, to be turned over to President
Hutchins for disposal. Mr. Vibbert is
the University representative in Eu-
rope for this work at the present
time.
As a means of raising at least a
part of this sum, the alumnae women
are considering serving lunch after
the Union dances. There is also some
talk of taking over the men's ban-
quet, which will be substituted this
year in place of the annual smoker.
Both of these plans are tentative, how-
ever, and will require further consid-
eration before definite action -is taken.
DUTCH EAST INDIES TRADE
RUBBER FOR AUTOMOBILES

NEW AND SECOND HAND
FOR ALL DEPARTMENTS
Engineering Supplies
Drawing Instruments
STATE MAIN
STRE ET ST REET
ENGINEERING TOOLS
ALARM CLOCKS
ELECTRIC SUPPLIES
SWITZEV'S
STATE STREET HARDWARE

P

REPORTERS
Harry W. Weinerman Edgar L. Rice
Russell Barnes J. R. McAlpine
Chas R. Osis Jr Paul A. -hinkman
C. M. Campbell Vera Brown
Donald C. Bromley K. Frances Haudibo
Eugene Given
BUSINESS STAFF
L. A. Storrer Orville E. Gates
Win A. Leitzinger Harry D. Hause
Dale H. Baad g Lambert Hirsheimer
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 19, 1917.
Night Editor-Russell Barnes
WOMEN AND THE SECOND LOAN
,All over Agerica today women a 'e
rising to the occasion of the times
remarkably well.- - In business, in the
professions, American women are
proving themselves more competent to
step into important positions than the
most optimistic had dared hope.
In the little niche of this nation's
broad land occupied by the University
of Michigan, the women are coming
forward nobly in their efforts to help
lift the quota for the second Liberty
loan.
The results to .date have been ,un-
satisfactory to those in charge, and
we believe, to the campus. But the
women of the University are doing
their share, and give promise of 9-t
tinuing even better as they familiar-
ize themselves omre and more . k
the work. Their efforts are worthy
of the highest commendation.
CONCENTRATION
This is an age of speculation. The
man of many trades is out of date. In
the business world it is the man who
can do one thing well who can demand
the highest price and get the biggest
contract.
.'The same rule is applicable to '-e
college student. The freshman should
choose the field of activity to which he
is best suited, and stick to it, not to
the exclusion of all other activities,
but to the subordination of all others.
He wil find that if he tries to dabble
in every phase of college life his en-
ergies will have been dissipated with
nothing but a transient popularity
gained.
A student need not be on every corr-
mittee and a member of a dozen clu s
in order to be an all-round person.
The man who has a thorough knowl-
edge of his'college and who bends his
efforts toward achieving a few ends
leaves a deeper footprint than the one
who hasn't quite enough time to do
any one thing well.
If he starts taking up various lines
of endeavor before he has outlined any
definite plan for his university career
the student is apt to find himself in
activities "up to his neck."
If, on the other hand, he can name
a fsw worthy achievements at the end
of his four years in college, ? e will
find that he knows how to conce"" "
in the business world. It is the man
with his eyes on a goal who is chose
to carry the message to Garcia.--
Washington Daily.
Someone has voiced the hope that
the Aggies are as green as their col-
ors.

ADDRESS WILL BE GIVEN
FORMER COLLEGE
MINISTER

BYI

I

Lai
PHONS

undry Cases
For Parcel Post
$1050'
SLATER'S BOOK SHOP
430 336 S. STATE ST.

Six Ann Arbor churches and the
University Y. M. C. A. will hold a
joint meeting next Sunday evening at
Hill auditorium. The meeting will be
under the auspices of the Baptist
church, and the Rev. -John Wellington
Hoag of Detroit has been secured as
speaker.
Mr. Hoag has been college preacher
at Amherst college and at the Uni-
versity of Chicago, and for five years
was pastor of the Calvary Baptist
church, New Haven, Conn. Mr. Hoag
is now pastor of the Woodward Bap-
tist church of Detroit.
This will be the first of a series of
seven joint Sunday evening meetings
planned for the school year.
REPORT ON 3USEUM READY
FOR GENERAL DISTRIBUTION

I

k-------

The annual report of the director.
of the museum of zoology to the board
of Regents for the past year is ready
for distribution. There are several in-
teresting chapters devoted to special
work done by the museum.
The museum has, witllaid from sev-
I eral influential men, sent five expedi-
tions to different parts of the world
to engage in research work.
Twenty papers published during the
year give brief summaries of the dif-
ferent eApeditions and special work
that is being constantly carried on.
GEORGE HURLEY ANNOUNCES
HOURS AT UNION BUILDING
George F. Hurley, '16-'18L, president
of the Michigan Union, has announced*
the hours at which he may be reached
at the Union building. The hours are:
Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday,
from 1 to 4:30 o'clock; Thursday and
Friday, from 2:30 to 4:30 o'clock, and
Saturday, from 10 to 12 and from 1 to
3 o'clock. Hurley has not yet fitted
up his office, but he may be reached
during the aforementioned hours by
inquiring at 'the desk in the reading
room.
The Kemfp Music Studio: Piano,
Organ, Voice Culture. 312 S. Division
St. Phone 212-J.-Adv.

Sammies at Custer Learn to Bayonet
Battle Creek, Mich., Oct. 18.-Trench
warfare is being brought home to
Sammies at Camp Custer. Parrying
.and thrusting at imaginary Boches
with fixed bayonets, the soldiers are
becoming acquainted with war as it
is and camp life as it ain't.
Handling of a bayonet will soon be
done as easily and as quickCly as the
resp nse to mess call is executed. The
new course of training is not tem-
porary. It will be regular until the
men don the steel helmets. and enter
the trenches.
Stabbing' the dummies will be
started soon as possible. Officers are
awaiting only the preparation of these
dummies. They are being taught to
step quickly and retrieve-and not to
lunge. It is explained in detail that
each man must work quickly and
cooly without throwing himself for-
ward bodily. They are being in -ict-
ed that in the fight which itet life
or death to them, a lunge brings a
fatality, which goes on the American
casualty list.
Blank bombs are being hurled by
the men. This is instructive work in
order to avoid accidents when the
loaded bombs are put into use.
Artillery and machine gun com-
paries are also stepping into action,
coincident with other preparations for
intensive warfare. The guns are ex-
pected at the camp within a few days.
Subscribe for the Michigan Daily.

Batavia, Netherlands East Indies,
Oct. 1S--An outstanding feature of
the rapidly expanding commercial in-
tercourse bet ween the United States
and the Netherlands East Indies is the
soaring rubber export to America
and, on the other hand, the growing
use of the American automobile in the
colony. Despite the shortage of
cargo space, East Indies' shipments of
rubber to the United States have risen
from 3,000 tons in the first half of
1916 to 9,700 in the corresponding
period of the current year. Eight hun-
dred and fifty ; automobiles were im-
ported in the.first quarter of 1917,
nearly all from America; while 2,400
arrived in 1946.
The serious ,conditions arising out
of the lack of cargo space threaten the
country with an economic disaster,
and urgent representations are being
made to the colonial and home gov-
ernments on the subject. Of the 1916-
1917 sugar crop, 2,500,000 tons last
month awaited shipment, together
with 1,500,000 piculs of the coffee crop,
88,000,000 pounds of tea, 900,000 bales
of tobacco and 2,000,000 tons of rub-
ler, copra aid oil.
1_ni.' to hold special Dance Tonight
Danijg 'will be in order from 9 to
1 o'cloc' thi evening at the Michigan
Union. The party is limited to 100
couples, and special music is prom-
ised the dairTehs-
The committee is composed of R. E.
Bachman, '20L, chairman; Charles
Cruikshank, '20L, and L. R. Van Ness,
'20L. Prof. Ralph W. Aigler and Mrs.
Aigler, Prof. W. J. Hale and Mrs. Dow
will be chaperons.
Officers' Uniforms and accessories.
G. H. Wild & Co., State Street.-Adv.

Comedy Club Wil
Give "Miss Hobbs
John Q. Adams, '18, Elected President
of Organization for Coming
School Year
Pep and enthusiasm featured thn
meeting of the Comedy club held
Thursday afternoon. Extensive plans
are being laid for the production of
"Miss Hobbs,' 'the play whose show-
ing last year was postponed by the
war excitement.
John Q. Adams, '18, was c'- ted
president of the club, Jean Maclennan,
'19, vice-president, Lois May, '18, sec-
retary, and Walter Riess, '20, treas-
urer.
Tryouts for membership to the
Comedy club will be held Saturday,
Oct. 27 from 9 to 12 in Newberry hall.
Zionist Society Will Meet Tonight
The University Zionist society will
hold its regular weekly meetings at 7
o'clock tonight in room 162 Natural
Science building. Miss Rebecca
Greenberg, '19, will 'read her essay
entitled "The Preservation of Jtwish
Nationality in America," which won
the 1917 Menorah prize of $100.
Error Made in Stating Dinner Date
The date for the Camp Davis dinner
was given in The Michigan Daily yes-
terday as Oct. 15. It was an error,
as the dinner is to be held on Oct.
26, at the Michigan Union.
War Hits Girls' Mandolin Club
Prospects for a girls' mandolin club
are not bright. Several of the mem-
bers, among them all the officers but
one, have not returned to school.
Patronize Our Advertisers.-Adv.

We have both the inclination and.
the equipment to furnish the'
best in banking service
Tbe Ann Arbor. Savings Bank
INCORPORATRED 1869
Capitaland Surplus $ 500,000.00
Resources . . . $4,000,000.00
Northwest Corner Main and
Huron Streets
707 North University Avenue
HANDY INFORMATION FOR
ANN ARBOR TRAVELERS
DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
( -ffective May 22, 1917)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars- :35 a.
in., '8:io a. in.. and hourly to 7:io p. mn., 9I0o
p. n.
Kalamazoo Limited Cars-8 :48 a. n. and
every two ho'urs to 6 :48 %. i.; to L~ansing,
8:48 p. Mn.
Jackson Express Cars ;local stops west of
Ann Arbor)-9:48 a. m. and every two hours
to 7:48 p. im.
Local Cars East Bound--5:35 a. m., 6-40
a. m., 7:05 a. m. and every two hours to 7:05
P. in.. 8:05 P. im., 9:05 p. nM., 10:50 p. M.
To Ypsilanti only, 9:20 a. M., 9:30 a i.,
2:o5 p. in., 6:05 P. min, :45 P. m, 11:456p. i.'
12:o" a. m. 1 n: a. M.. 1:20a. i. To Saline,
change at 'Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-6:os a.M., 7 :48
a. m., 10:20 p. m., 12:20 a. m.

Prescriptions and
House Drug Needs
Our Specialty
HOWEVER
we have many other items you
will need. So many you will
wish you had come earlier.

4

QUARRY DRUG CO'S
PRESCRIPTION STORE
Cor. State and University
Phoney308

-

r

k

If its anything Photo-
graphic ask SWAIN
713 East University Ave.
ITOP AT
TUTTL ES
338 MAYNARD
For Lunches and Sodas
First
Cl hpb
RESTAVRANT
MICHIGAN INN
Phoxwe 948-a 601 E. Liberty

Always remember that
knows how to plow.

a farmer

Radio Military
Wrist Watches
$4.25 to $21

lUu a

Fountain Pena
Waterman
and ConKin

They're manufacturing a new food
Germany. Which reminds our pun-
er that they had better manufacture
s many new things as they can for
iey are going to need them before
ng.
Many a fellow casts .off his cares
ith his coat.
Every time the Liberty loan total

U. of f. Jewelry
Schlanderer & Seytried
Dancing from 9 to 12 every Satur-
day night at Armory.-Adv.
You can get those Neolin Soles
put on at Paul's Place. 611 E. Wil.
liam while you wait.-Adv.

N

IF

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