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May 28, 1918 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-05-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


9(1
Cloth. e ;

10 R the
behind the
behind the

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men
men
guns/

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4 I
; , 191

Knittex
Overcoats
Tan Oxford
Heather
at $25.00

JSCHMIT T PFEL & 0

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LAN U'ERS
OR
LOWERS

PHONE 294

213 E. LIBERTYI

DEALERS IN
mi

NATIONAL TRADE MARK
ADVOCATED BY DEALERS
WOULD PROTECT AMERICAN EX-
PORTS IN TRADE AFTER
THE WAR
Chicago, May 27. - In preparing
the American manufacturer and ex-
porter to hold his own in the great]
struggle for foreign trade, which is
expected to follow the making of
peace, the National Retail Dry-goods
association, in session here, is advo-
cating strongly a national trade-mark
to protect American foreign trade.
"One reason why a national trade-
mark would be of great benefit to the
American manufacturers," said Mr.
Chauney P. Carter, of the bureau of
foreign and domestic commerce, who
has been engaged in drafting such a
bill to introduce in Congress, "is be-
cause there is so much legalized pi-
racy of private trade-marks in for-
eign? countries. The average manu-
facturer in the country does not con-
sider engaging in the export business"
until he has begun to exhaust the
possibilities of the home market. In
the meantime it does not occur to
him to protect his trade-mark in for-
eign countries.
"What really happens before the
manufacturer has turned his atten-
tion to foreign trade is that some for-
eign manufacturer has registered the
American trade-mark in his country,
and the American manufacturer is
restricted from developing his trade
in that country.
"If we had a national trade-mark,
owned and protected by our govern-
ment, this manufacturer could outwit
the private merchant by merely con-
stituting the national trade-mark for
his private mark on all shipments to
that country.y"
It was pointed out at the conven-
tion that a large number of measures
are being considered by the depart-
ment of commerce with a view of pre-
paring the manufacture and exporter
to hold his own in the great strug-
gle for world trade.
HOME OF MEMORIAL
STONE IS LOCATED
Several accounts of the original
home of the stone dedicated to the
class of 1862 have been circulated,
and it has at last been definitely lo-
cated. Mrs. Margaret Slater, of 545
Thompson street, is authority for the
data concerning the boulder.
On Fel 22, 1860, the parents of
Mrs. Slater, Mr. and Mrs. John Shee-
han, presented the stone to the class
of 1862. In a vacant lot on North
Fifth avenue the children of the
neighborhood used to play at a game
they called "King's Land," and the
memorial rock was used as the throne
of the .queen.
To the same vacant lot geology stu-
dents were accustomed to gather
specimens, and many pieces were
chipped from the rock. Long before
anyone thought of moving it, the
"throne", became known on the cam-
pus.
On the day of presentation 20 white
horses were hitched to the big bould-
er and they dragged it on a stone-
boat to its present location. The day
was a holiday and a large number of
students formed in procession behind
the boat and escorted it to the cam-
pus.
The stone is not only a memorial
to the class of 1862, but is also a re-
minder of the election of the most
loved of presidents, Abraham Lin-

coln. Throughout the Civil War the
rock stood as a token of the strength
of Michigan men who served the
Union in that time of need.
Since that .time every person who
has crossed the campus has been
forcibly impressed by the associat-
ions that this old monument inevita-
bly calls to mind.

ORIENTAL STUDENTS ARE
LAUDED BY PROFE HARLEY
THOSE ENROLLED AS ENGINEERS
EXCEL IN STUDIES AND
QUALITY OF WORK
Chinese students in this country are
making good in spite of the great
handicap of a lack of knowledge of
the language and customs of America,
according to Prof. Ransome S. Haw-
ley, of the engineering college, who
has kept in close touch with the
hundreds of Orientals enrolled in this
and other universities.
One of the reasons for the good rec-
ord made by these men is the fact
that they are the picked students of
the Chinese finishing schools, being
sent to this country only after pass-
ing a competitive examination. They
are prepared with an elementary
knowledge of the English language
before leaving their native country,
but experience great difficulty with the
technical terms used in the study of
engineering.
The colleges are decided upon before
the men leave China-Michigan, Col-
umbia, and Colorado School of
Mines being the favorites. The Chin-
ese government pays all expenses
while in this country and encourages
the students to travel a much as
possible with a view of broadening
their education.
Oriental is Unused to Tools
According to Professor Hawley, the
Oriental student is handicapped in
work requiring the use of tools, such
as shop work and drafting. This is
due to the social custom of the coun-
try, it being considered degrading in
Chinese upper-class circles to be able
to use the hands skillfully.
In speaking of the power of appli-
cation shown by the Oriental students,
Professor Hawley said: "I doubt if
Americans could stand the steady
grind of work to which the Chinese
subject themselves. I know of one
student who laid out a daily schedule
extending from six in the morning un-
til midnight and stuck to it through-
out the year. What they lack in pre-
paration they make up in applica-
tion."
Chinese Excel in Athletics
Along athletic lines, the man from
China cannot compete with the Am-
erican because of te difference in
stature and- strength, but tennis and
lighter athletics are entered into with
zest. The development of athletics in
China is only recent, but the govern-
ment has realized the value of phy-
sical training in the building up of the
race and is now encouraging ath-
letics of all kinds in the Chinese
schools and colleges.
After completing his course in Am-
erica, the Eastern student returns to
his home, usually to teach in govern-
ment educational institutions, but fre-
quently to enter one of the many na-
tive industrial enterprises.
Running the Scale
Lucille Colby, '18, pianist, and Lucy
Cannon, '18, violinist, will give a joint
graduation recital at 8 o'clock Satur-
day evening in the University School
of Music hall. .
The Symphonic league of the
School of Music held its annual elec-
tion of officers Saturday. Floy Petrie
was elected president; Dessolee
Chester, vice-president; Esedora Hen-
ry, secretary; Edith Staebler, treas-
urer; and Lauretta Gibbs, chairman

of the social committee.
The summer session of the School
of Music commences July 1, contin-
uing until August 28.
Ossip. Gabrilowvitsch, the eminent
pianist-conductor, will be the direct-
or of the Detroit Symphony orches-
tra next season. There will be 14
prjfl*+3 u..Puur . Lu - fn vn n c~.Lrefin-

Your Floral Needs

GIVEN SPECIAL ATTENTION BY US

CUT FLOWERS

FRESH SPRING

CORS"AVEI;,

FLOWERING PLANTS

FLORAL

Cousins & Hall UNIV.
PHONE 115 Members of Florists' Telegraph Delivery Asso
YOUR SPRING SUIT
will be carefully tailored of the new d
pendable fabrics.
New Models distinctly our own.

Get your Straw Hat I

Straw Hats from $1.50 to $6.

We habe a full line of
Sailors and Panama

Between the Theaters

GOLF SUITS

RIDING BREE(

a

*

D. E. Grennan
The Custom Tailor 606 E.

SENTORS!

f

CAR

/

PHONE 1101
versity of Washington has been cut
? down from eight to three members.
The feature of commencement at the
I University of Ohio will be the unfurl-
ing of a service flag to contain 2,640i
stars.

Order your personal cards
from the
MAYER-SCHAIRER (
112 SO. MAIN ST.

r
:.

S

Harvard will have an R. 0. T. C.
camp this summer to accommodate
1,000 men. It has not been definitely
decided as yet where the camp will be
located but it will probably be five or
six miles from Camp Devens.
Northwestern university will have
an hour of drill daily next year, and
three hours of collegiate credit will

ne'1. A/ak Cr3'

Low Overhead, -Moderate Capitalization, Efficlent. Energe
ageinent, Seventeen Producing Oil Wells, 4600 Acres of Valnal
es, Quick Market, are points that any investor will be ready
as indicating stability and soundness, as well as possibilitie
unusual return per dollar invested in the stock of
The Invader Oil and Refining (
This stock at -6 per share is one of'the most signal oppe
for profit ever offered Michigan investors.
We recommend its prompt purchase.
FORSHEE and KUEHNLE

,g e

Is

be given for the five hours a
drill.
MIR BROWN
Offers men and women
est marketable prices for
old clothes. Anything in

week

ct that many men are
nal examinations this
niversity has suspend-
1 for the rest of the

high-
their
the

girls
signed

of Minnesota
up for war

of suits, overcoats, or- shoes he will
t.ake off your hands. Sell your old
clothes. They are no good to you.
I can use them. You will get your
money's worth. No quibbling to buy
them cheap. Their absolute value will
be paid. Men's and women's- apparel
both. Call Mr. Claude Brown at 210
Hoover Ave. Phone 2601. He will
gladly call at your residence.-Adv.
The Daily's specialty is service to
every one. Let us serve you.-Adv.
Reliable Dealers 'Advertise in The
Michigan Daily.-Adv.

as been compelled to dis-
class day exercises this,
of the departure of the
:he men elected to class
for the service.
n department of the Uni-

I

U 1,
'ERTI

'I1
1 N4i

Leave Copy
at
Students'
Supply Store

A

-Ipairs of concerts to be given at in-
Washington Appoints War Committee tervals of two weeks and also a se-
The University of Washington has ries of Sunday concerts.,
appointed a war emergency commit-
tee to revolutionize the curriculum of Rudolph Ganz, the Swiss pianist
the university so as to place it on an who played at the May Festival re-
entire war basis, eliminating all cently, created much surprise by de-.
courses not relevant to war. Glaring that he will undertake a con-
cert tour of Europe this autumn,
Our Merchant advertisers represent leaving America in August and re-
the progressive business men of Ann turning at Christmas. He will ap-
Arbor.-Adv. pear with the Colonne orchestra in a

-l Investment
412 First National Bank Bldg.
GET YOUR SHOES REPAIRED
FOR THE.
R.O. T. C.
SUMMER CAMP
Best Quality, Special Treated
Government Leather Used
FRED. H. RICE
:29 S. MAIN LPIli)NEi 242S
recital and also in London, Switzer-
land, army camps, and hospitals. Mr.
Ganz is becoming well known as a
composer, having produced a sym-
phony, several concertos, and nearly
200 songs.
Craftsmen Club Elects Officers
At the regular 'meeting of the
Craftsmen club last Saturday night at.
the Masonic Temple, the following of-
ficers were elected: Frank A. Curtis,
'20M, president; Carroll Hyde, '18M,
first vice-president; Christian Host-
rup, '19E, second vice-president; and
Earl C. Neff, '20E, secretary and
treasurer.
The men were installed by Robert
A. Campbell, P. M., of Lansing lodge
No. 59, and treasurer of the Univer-
sity. Following the installation plans
were made for next year.
Patronize a Daily Advertiser once'
and you will patronize him again.

- Securities

Laced O-
Black orI
Calfskin.

WANTED

ECONOMY THROUGH
Every-Day
Nettleton "Ards

-For three months, a well I
house with yard or gard-.
1 or 7th ward. Immediate
n desired. Address Captain
iruif, Hygienic Laboratory.
- Active Summer School
board job at Arcade Caf-
all 8:30 to 11 or 2 to 5.
IScELLANEOUJS -
2 person who found The
Hall Marked Gold Curb
Vay 19, kindly return it to'
ris Court or phone 1323-J
m. Valued as a keepsake
asedl friend. - Reward.

LOST
LOST-Key-ring with keys, E. Hall.
Phone 2339.
LOST-Gamma Phi Beta sorority pin.
Elinor Leonard, Newberry. Reward.
FOUND
FOUND-Corner of State and Main,
pocket book containing amount of
change.
FOR SALE-
FOR SALE-Canoe and equipment.
Call Stenson, 1118-M.
rOR BALM--The Daily ma s61 1a
twing, It is or specialty.

The "Ardsley" is o
favored of the NE'IT
lasts and is reproduced
styles and materials. In
it is particularly typical o
TON ideal of combinin
and long service; that
economy through extra
rather than price.

! ,,

MA

There should be a Victrola in
every home
Holy about yours?
Prices from $20.00 to $400.00
MAKE YOUR TERMS
GRINNELL BROS., 116 S. Main St.

Walhr's Sh
108 S.m~c

Agent

Our Mercha
the progressiv

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