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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 28, 1918 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-05-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ILY

I i !-1-!! e I'lile .1 - =

-Miit~gwn DuUt
BER ASSOCIATED PRESS
jated Press is exclusively entitled
for republication of all news disd
ited to it or not otherwise credit-
paper and also the local news
erein.
iewspaper at the University of
Publishied every morning except
ing the uiversity year.
t the postoffice at Ann Arbor as
matter.
nn Arbor Press Building.
Business, 96o ; Editorial, 2414.
ations not to exceed Soo words,
e signature not necessarily to ap.
Sbt as an evidence of faith, and
events will be publishied in The
e discretion of the Editor, if left
e' or in The Daily notice box in
rridor of the general library where
are collected at 7:30 o'clock each
ed con nunications will receive no
n. No manuscript will be returned
writer sends postage for that pur-
PfcDonald....... Managing Editor
inson ..........Business Manager
merhorn, Jr. Sports Editor
Roeser........Telegraph Editor
Mighell..........Women's Editor
Cooley.........Literary Editor
lette.......Publication Manager
AA.......... Circulation Manager

NIGHT
arnes
sius, Jr.
Fox
Alpine

EDITORS
W alter R. Atlas
MarkK. hlbert
Philip Slomovitz
Paul A. Shinkrnan

REPORTERS
x 1,Robert C. Angell
K. Frances IIandibo
1 Samuel Lamport
R -rden Cecelia Fohey
e Marguerite Clark
>ul3oAs Roberta L. Berry
au'is Ethan A. Scholnick
>el Rilla A. Nelson
ibUSINESS STAFF
zi Ige E THarry D. Hause
ess Katherine Kilpatrick
Case Frances H. Macdonald
zingII Agnes Abele
Cadwell, Jr. L. A. Storrer
rsheimer Frank N. Gethke
SDAY, MAY 28, 1918.
Editor-1rilon1 ). Marx
i meeting of entire editorial
try-outs at 12:40 o'clock to-
fortorial rooms.

)R MICHIGAN MEN IN FRANCE
The Union carnival of Wednesday
d Thursday is something every
ichigan supporter should boost. The
otive' for giving it is to raise the
iion's allotment of $1,000 to assist
e Michigan bureau of the American
iiversity Union in Paris.-No matter
hat sum is raised, the entire pro-
eds will be given.
As America's army in France be-
mnes larger month by month, so does
at of the Michigan men overseas.
stead of the few former imversity
udents in France last fall, there is
w assembling across the Atlantic
constantly increasing force. Though
. figures can be obtained as to the
act number of Michigan men over-
as it is- not unfair to suppose that
ere are from 800 to 1,000 at present.
tthermore, this number is growing
th each convoy.
Those of us who have been privil-
ed to remain at our studies should
el a direct obligation to these men'
io are upholding the honor of their
iversity in the world's greatest dif-
nndously sal arR inte o
versy they have gien them cv;
suppor t in that we can rakt ih
, hours 1 ret happier and bright-
Ours is the great privilege ot show-
g these khaki clad Michigan broth-
s that we are thinking of them, that
are behind them from the start,
at we are their friends when need-
Our part in this particular re-
eet may seem microscopic toeus, but
them it means much. When filled
th the thoughts that those at home
a solidly behind him the American
ldier at the front is second to none
a fighting nfan.
Some of us still enrolled at the Un-
rsity will soon have the fortune to
numbered among that great army
hting for democracy. If we can,
r the moment, place ourselves in
eir positions, we can see something
the aid and comfort we are giving
>se who are doing their best to drive
ck the common enemy h
Union officials hope that the camn-
s will sanction the carnival to an
ent sufficient to surpass the $1,000
ctment. Beside the patriotic pri-
age is added the attraction of an
-University recreation: The cause
ndeed worthy. To a Michigan man,
t is all which need be said,

COME BACK WITH A NEW
STUDENT,
Next year Michigan will find herself
in a most depleted condition if some
radical changes are not inade at the
present time. Already nearly 2,000
students have left the University, and
the number is still on the increase.
During the 'summer months it is cer-
tain. that many more men will enter
the service.
Early in the war English universi-
ties experienced a severe setback.
Students flocked in enormous num-
bers to the empire's aid, leaving but a
few in college. American universities
would have experienced the same/re-
sult had not the college heads adhered
to the advice of President Wilson to
encourage undergraduates to continue
their education. But still the univer-
sities of this country are not out of
danger.
Under present circumstances Mich-
igan will next year find herself with
few students. If those now in school
and not amenable to the draft re-
turn, the: number still will be small.
What Michigan needs is new stu-
dents.
The student who comes back in the
fall should bring another man with
him. In doing this he will not only
augment the enrollment of his own
University, but he will be doing a ser-
vice to his country. The greater the
number of men encouraged to further
their education, the greater number of
educated men will be available after
the war for reconstruction work.
Help America and Michigan by
bringing a man back with you in the
fall.
S ~-
THE DAY OF RECKONING
We once read the confession of a
bank president who was on his way
to the penitentiary after having ai-
tempted to corner the Chicago wheat
market. He set out, he said, merely
to buy a big line of May wheat, ex-
pecting to sell it in sixty days o, so
at a handsome profit. But there was
more May wheat for sale than he
had calculated upon; having once got
in he had to keep buying in order to
hold up the price, until finally he got
in so far there was no way out except
to go on and corner the market.
Wehave forgotten just how many
millions he stole from the bank, but
it was all the bank had in stealabl
shape. Day after day he sent money-
stolen money-to his brokers to buy
wheat with, and covered up the trans-
actions by putting dummy notes in
the bank's portfolio.
One of the inquisitors asked him:
"But did you not see that you were
wrecking the bank? You must have
known it could not stand that terrific
strain. You must have seen you were
going to smash."
"No," he replied; "I did not know.
After a certain time I never knew how
much I had taken. I never figured it
up. I knew if I sat down and figurd
it up it would paralyze me. I thought
every hour the market would turn in
my favor. I had to just shut my eyes
and go ahead."_
Why this sea of blood in France?
Overthrow of the Czardom removed
the only real menace to Germany.
Germany could have had a secure
peace any time the last year. But
the military caste did not dare sit
down and figure it up-or let the Ger-
man people figure it up. Nobody in
Germany could make peace. The
Ge'man people could not, for th.ey
lacked the power. Hindenur al
Ldendorff could not, for peace would
show up the frightful extent to which
they had looted the bank. Their
strategy consisted in shutting their
eyes and plunging on, in hope of

something so 'dazzling that the awful
wreckage would be overlooked. There
is no way of dealing with them ex-
cept as the bank president was dealt
with-in handcuffs.-Saturday Even-
in Post.
If Hindenburg tries many more of
those massed attacks the Allies surely
will destroy the kaiser's faith in his
German legions. But he'll still put his
trust in "Gott" perhaps.
The kaiser wilt probably spend the
summer in the cellar of his Pots-
dam residence now that the Allies
have almost complete control of the
air.

CARYATIDJ

Now in Captivity
Earth's most pathetic tragedy-the
person who is supposed to be funny
every day to order. Call around and
see it.
Behold the Old Man!
He has returned to the House
For a few days*
After two minutes Listening
You know that he played for
Nine Consecutive Years
On Famous Football Teams.
Ah, Those were the Good days,
When playera let their hair grow Long
To protect their heads
And so forth and so forth.
There .is Really nothing Worth while
Left around the Campus-
The freshmen are all so Young to him
And after he has stopped suddenly
To shake hands with the Campus
Beauty,
Hle says "Who is That girl--
It seems that I remember her-'"
And we think "Thou too-"
And it is the Only Satisfying Thing
About the Old Man.
Common law, reading Kip - "And
here is 'The Plea of the Simla Danc-
ers; by the way what was the decis-
ion in that case?"
It's so Comforting to Know-
With the dreaded things but two
weeks off ,that there's always the riv-
er, the morgue and the hospital.
Disgusting Deaths- By hookworm
the day after that exams are over.
PROMINENT STATE PHYSICIANS
URGE EXTEIRNINATION OF FLY
Elimination of the fly is 'irged in
the May issue of Public Health, a
monthly publication of the state
board of health. Articles by promi-
nent physicians of the state explain
why the fly should be xterminated
describe ways in which flies carry
germs.
In speaking of diseases flies carry,
Dr. W. H. Smith, of St. Clair, says
"that flies are known to carry ty-
phoid fever and tuberculosis germs.
It is thought that they transmit diph-
theria, leprosy, erysipelas, cholera,
measles, smallpox, scarlet fever, in-
fantile paralysis, and many other dis-
eases.
All the articles on the subject em-
phasize the fact that flies should be
combatted by doing away with their
breeding places as well as by swat-
ting. Warning is given to keep all
garbage in covered tin cans, to spray
all manure piles frequently with bor-
ax or kerosene, and to keep streets,
yards, and houses clean.
1)eau Iinsdle to Attend Convention
Dean W. B. Hinsdale, of the Homoe-
opathic Medical school, has been ap-
pointed a delegate to represent the
state tuberculosis sanitarium at How-
el?. Mich, at the convention of the na-
tional luberculosis association which
convenes in Boston on June 5.

now added to the aridity by passing
the prohibiton amendment.
Undoubtedly'Mr. Roosevelt will have
at least the last word in his fight
with the Postmaster-General.
Mexico may have gone over to the
bolsheviks, or it may merely be the
weather.

Wifomen
The advisory board of the Y. W. C.
A. will entertain the cabinet at the
home of Mrs. T. E. Rankin, 605 Os-
wego avenue, at 5:30 o'clock this aft-
ernoon.
The Freshman Girls' Glee club will
hold a very important meeting at 4:15
o'clock this afternoon at the School of
Music. Members with stringed instru-
ments are asked to bring them.
The sophomores will play ball with
the freshmen at 4 o'clock tomorrow
afternoon,
Miss Hazel Whitaker, of the J. L.
Hudson company of Detroit, will speak
on advertising asta profession at 4:15
o'clock this afternoon at Newberry
hal.
Important meeting of the Girls' Glee
club at 4:30 o'clock this afternoon in
Barbour gymnasium. All mnembers
are requested to be present,
There are still some vacant places
in the farmerette unit which will be
sent to Traverse Bay. Those wishing to
join it should see Miss Alice Evans
at once.
All articles must b taken out of
gymnasium lockers by Wednesday;
otherwise they will be sold.
Sophomores must report for posture
examinations at Barbour gymnasium
immediately.
PETITIONERS URGE
RETURN OF FLORER
Petitions are being circulated
among the University students which
aim at reinstating Warren Washburn
Florer, professor in the German de-
partment who was released by the
Board of Regents some time ago. The
petitions appeared on the campus to-
day, and no indications are yet possi-
ble as to their reception. Announce-
mnents made in the classes where the
papers were distributed were that a
member of the Board of Regents, an
attorney of Detroit, wasithe origina-
tor.
Professor Florer has been in the
--University for more than 20 years.
He is at -present faculty man " for
company B, First regiment, R. o. T.
C., and' is historian of the Michigan
Historical society. The Board of IRe-
gents dismissed him at the end of the
last semester, the dismissal to go in-
to etect at the end of the school year.
Several other instructors and profes-
sors were also dismissed.
PROF. LORCH RETURNS FROM
ART CONVENTION IN DETROIT
Prof. Emil Lorch, head of the archi-
tectural college, has just returned
from Detroit, where he attended the
convention of the American Federa-
tion of Arts, held there last week.
The convention, according to Pro-
fessor Lorch, was composed of all the,
art organizations of the country, and
devoted much time to a discussion of
the relation of design to industry. It
is proposed by members of the con-
GET YOUR SHOES REPAIRED
FOR THE-
Ro T CAMP
SUMMER CAMP

Flashlights
Boat Lights and Spot Lights
You'll want them soon for Spring and
Summer Nights
THE EBERBACH & SON COMPANY
200-204 E Liberty Street

SAMPLES OF CORRECT
ENGRAVINGJ

Seniors Hear Ye! Hear
IT IS TIME TO LEAVE YOUR ORDER I
Calling Cards

UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORE

-

Military Books
For
Fort Sheridan
Training.Camp

The Slater Book Shop

vention to make this country inde-
pendent of foreign designers in the
war of trade that is to follow the
present war.
SPNGTYE

1 y;
..

AND UP-TO-DATE
NOW IN

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jacks
(May 14, 19x8)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-7:,
n., 8:1o a. rn., and hourly to 7:10 p. m.,
p. m.
Jackson Express Cars (local stops wes
Ann Arbor)-8:48 a. i., and every two he
to 9:48 P.111.,
Local Cars East Bound-5:35 a. m.,
a. In., 7:05 a. in. and every two hoursto
P. m., 9:05 p. 1n,, 10 :So p. m. To Ypsi
only, 8:o p. 1n., r-:su p. I., 12:20 a.
1:10 a. rn., and to Saline, change at Ypsil
Local Cars West Bound- :oo a. m.,
a. inl., 10 :20 p. mn.. 12 :2o a. m.
Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT' to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
The Ann Arbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $550,000.00
Resources..........$4,000,000.00
Northwest Cor. Main & Huron
707 North University Ave.
SWAIN has the Fines
Photographic collection of An.
Arbor Views. See it.
713 East University
TUT LE S
PIE-A-LA-MODE
k.UNCH ES and SODAa
- ~ TYPE WRITIERS
For Sale and lRea
TYPE1WRYT1N10
iumeographing
Fraternity and Social Stationer
0. D. M0OU IRL
f22 South State Street

f

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N .'.NN'.-.'.N*.'~*..X....'..'.

Trunks, Suitcases and Bags at rea-
sonable prices. You may trade in your
old Travelling Goods as well as Furn-
iture for New Luggage. I". W. Wil-
kinson, 325 S. Main St. Phone 24.-
Adv.
Patronize our advertisers. ---Adv.

x

Copyright Hart SchafArer& Marx

Best Quality, Special Treated
Government Leather Used
FRED. H. RICE
329 S. MAIN PHONE 2428

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41

Hart Schaffner& Marx
spring suits and top coats are
more snappy than ever this
spring; the kind of clothes red-
blooded young men will be
wearing. They have incorporat-
ed in them all the style tenden-
cies that will be popular.
We have bought freely and as
a consequence offer you choice
of a stock unequalled for rich-
ness of choice and variety of
style, anywhere but in their
shops. You will find here
clothes as good as you can buy
in any city, and the price is
more reasonable.
New neckwear, Steson and
Knox Hats.

YOur every Ba
in need fulfillec

kV

Farmers & N
101-105 So. Main

330 So.
(Nickel

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AT ARMORY

THURSDAY, MAY 30

Every time Berlin mentions that
"the American losses were extremely
heavy" you can jot it down' that kul-
tur's losses were even greater.
We always thought Arizona was dry
enough, but that state's legislature has

Try our
HOME-MADE
Candies
They are both delicious
Wholesomne
MADE AND SOLD A
The SUGAR BOV
Phoe ,,7 ,109, ,M

Dancing 9 to 1

Tickets at Busy Bee

Reulo, Coolin, Fegel & CO,
The Big Home of Hart Schaff-
ner and Marx Clothes, at South-
west Corner Main and Washing-
ton Streets.

Music by "Ike" Fisher's Jazz Band

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1918

FRESH STRAW

INIS BALLS

SUNDAES

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