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May 26, 1918 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-05-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


GAN DFEATS
IGO IN TRACK

es Wolverines Good
For Big Ten Title
June 8

Chance

JOHNSON BIG STAR;
MAKES 20 OF 87 POINTSr
Mn Donnelly Loses to Matthews,
Chicago Star, in Mile
Run
th Johnson taking four firsts,
igan beat the University of Chi-
by a score of 87 to 48, in their.
track and field meet yesterday,
tagg field at Chicago. This vic-
proves Michigan to be one of'
trongest contestants for the Con-
ce title, and the probable win-
of the Big Ten outdoor track
to be held in Chicago, June 8.
chigan immediately went to the
in the 100-yard dash, the first
on the prpgram, Johnson win-
From this time on they were
passed. The Maize and Blue
also took first place in the high
low hurdles and the broad jump.
Chicago Wins Four Firsts
icago won four firsts in the
put, the discus, the mile and the
ard run. Gargus, the Maroon's
ht man, won the former two
ts, and Matthews, won both of
distance contests.
e high jump was won by Michi-
and numerous seconds and thirds
to complete the Maize and Blue
. The meet was won by a wid-
aargin than was thought possi-
Coach Farrell himself figured
Michigan would win by only
points. The victory is a notable
inasmuch gas Chicago is one of
trongest track teams in the Con-
lce.
Captain Donnelly Beaten
the mile Captain Donnelly was
n by a narrow margin. The
ing of the Wolverine leader was
itional, and his fight at the fin-
was equally unusual. The Chi-
man was picked to win, how-
and ran true to expectations.
ker, slightly under the form
Ih he displayed in the inter-class
k meet held on Ferry field two
:s ago, was beaten in both the
ts in which it was believed he
a chance. Gargus, the winner,
in excellent form, and passed by
al feet the mark made by the
igan weight man> in the discus.
shot put was only a matter of a
inches margin.
ach Farrell is now looking for-
i to the big meet at Chicago. He
work the team hard for the next
weeks and the chances are good,
elieves, that they will cop the
ern championship, repeating the
ormance of the indoor meet.
RGE SISLER LEADS BASE
JNNERS IN YOUNGER LEAGUE
orge Sisler, the former Michigan
is now leading the base stealers
e American league. He has pil-
10 sacks in 22 games, which
a him an average of .46, 10 points
:r than his nearest rival, Speaker.
though the St. Louis first base-
is hitting .337 and is far above
, there are several regulars high-
ban he, in the batting/,averages.
Jackson, Harry Hooper, Tris
ker, Clarence Walker, and "Home
Baker are all leading Sisler. It
rgely due, however, to his 'work
the stick and on the bases that
Browns are high as they are in
standing. Although they are in
. place, they would be in the cel-
position in all probability if it
not for Sisler's presence.
Louis is now leading the league
tub batting and the former Wol-
e is in no small measure re-
sible. For a team that stands
.e position that the Browns do, it

rprising how high their percent-i
are in all departments of the
Rain Stops Tournament
icago, May 25.-Rain caused the
ponement of-the semi-finals of the
ern Conference tennis matches
g held here yesterday. The tour-
ent was begun Thursday, and was,
ave been finished tomorrow.

FRESHMEN WOMEN
WIN IN BASEBALL
In spite of the excessive heat, yes-
terday, women's field day was a suc-
cess. The baseball game, between the
juniors and freshmen, for the inter-
class championship of the Univer-
sity was the chief event of the pro-
gram.
The freshmen won, by the close
score of 4 to 3, after several innings
of intensive and spectacular playing.
The 'first runs came in the last half
of the third inning when the Juniors
put across two. The upperclass wo-
men also scored another in the fourth,
but the freshmen came from behind.
and in the last inning won the game.
Margaret Rottsschaefer, the first year
team's pitcher, keep the runs down
by her excellent throwing, while Lu-
cile Duff, '19, and Ethel Glauz, '19,
starred at batting. Each hit a ho,.mae
run, knocking the ball over the me-
chanic's quarters, bordering the field
across from Barbour gymnasium.
The teniis tournament, which was;
to be held was postponed until the
first of this week. In the archery
contest, Helen Campbell, '20, won first
honors,. thereby making for herself
three athletic honors. May Saunders,
'18, was second.
After the sports, athletic honors
were awarded with arm bands, pins,
and sweaters, for 30 'points and more.
Those receiving arm bands were:
Marion Holden, '18; Lucy Hoffman, '20;
Margaret Knevels, '19; Doris McDon-
ald, '19; Maruie Macauley, '18; Mary
Morse, '19; Laura Peocock, '20; Ellen
Stevenson, '19; Jeanette Sudaw, '20;
Helen Tibbals, '19; Phyllis Wiley, '21;
Emma Riggs, '19; and Marjorie Van
Norman, '20.
Following are those who received
pins: Margaret Atkinson, '18; Phyllis
Eggleston, '18; Elsie Erley, '20; Grace
Hall, '20; Louise Irish, '18; Dorothy
Williams; '20; and Clarissa Vyn, '18.
Ethel Glauz, '19, was the only one to
earn a sweater, which is worth 100
honor points.
At the close of field day, the old
athletic board entertained the new
athletic board and the athletic fac-
ulty at a picnic given at Palmer field.

*:
*;
*:

BIG TEN COMMITTEE MAKES
CHANGES IN TRACK RULES
~ Free style in throwing the javelin
is no longer permissable in Big Ten
Conference meets. This ruling of the
committee, made iat a meeting held
last year, will affect numerous schools
who have entered teams in the Con-
ferer-ce outdoor meet, to be held at
Stagg field, Chicago, June 8.
Many of the men this year have
continued the practice of former
years, which allowed the throwing of
the javelin in any manner which was
desired. When the Conference added
this particular contest to the list of
field events, it was decided that, in
order to let the men get used to throw-
ing the spear, they could hold the jav-
elin anywheres and throw it in ay
manner.
A change was also made in the
measurement of the track, from 18
inches from the pole to 12, in order
to make the distance uniform through-
out the country. This was done a'Fter
Dismond, the Chicago star track man
of last year, equalled the world's rec-
ord in the 440 yard run. If he
had been running on a track 12 in-
ches from the pole instead of 18, lie
would, without doubt, have better the
world's mark.
TYVO NOTRE DAME ATHLETES
GO TO JOIN U. S. SERVICE
'South Bend, Ind., May 25. - Two
Notre Dame athletes have been call-
ed to the colors. David Philbin, of
Portland, Ore., star Notre Dame first
baseman and football player, is to
leave today for Chicago, where he
will enter the Ensign Training School
at the Municipal Pier. Clyde Zoia
guard on the 1917 Cathdlic football
team left for his home at Woodstock,
Ill., yesterday, at the instance of his
local draft board.
Ball Game to Be Played Today
Parker Chuck Co. baseball team will
play the strong 338th infantry nine
from Camp Custer, at West Side park,
at 3 o'clock this afternoon. The sold-
iers are ranked as the best team at
Camp Custer, and on its lineup are
the names of numerous former profes-
sional players.

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