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May 26, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-05-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

"HE WEATHERI
1R.BABL y SHOWERS; TDA

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XXVIII. No. 170.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, MAY 26, 1918.

IOLVEINES WIN
FROM CHICAG IN
AEALL] TO 5
WME IS NIP AND TUCK FROM
BEGINNING TO
END
HIANCES ARE GOOD FOR
TESTERN CHAMPIONSHIP
izicka Pitches for Varsity; Hinkel
Twirls for Windy City Ag-
gregato©n
(Special to The Michigan Daily)
Chicago, May 25.- Chicago follow-
in the footsteps of the other Con-
ence teams met so far this sea-
n by the Michigan baseball team,
d took a beating at the hands of -the
olverines, by a score of 7 to 5, yes-
rday afternoon on Stagg field. The
ame gives Michigan an added advan-
ge in the race toward the Big Ten
amponship, but Illinois' victory
er Wisconsin makes it necessary for
ach Lundgren's clan to take the
me to be played at Urbana, Tuesday,
order to assure themselves of the
le.
The victory yesterday gives Michi-
n the best of the series of three
mes played between the two univer-
tes, this spring. In a two-game ser-
played here earlier in the year, the
olverines and the Maroons broke
en, each taking one game.
Close Game
The battle was nip and tuck from
rt to finish, first one team going
o the lead and then the other.
chigan started things in their half
the first and found Hinkel's offer-
g for -two runs. But the Maroons
ne back the same inning and tied
e score.
In the second, Michigan again went
o the lead, making another tally,
t Chicago in their half again got to
izicka for twQ more runs and took
e lead. No more scoring was done
til the fourth, when Chicago put
ross another, which was the limit
their ability in this direction.
Hinkel Tightens
[-inkel tightened up after the sec-
d, and although the Michigan bat-
s got to him for numerous hits
y were unable to get any runner
'ther than third until the seventh
Iing. In the seventh, however,
chigan won the game. They over
ue the two-run lead of their oppon-
ts and. continued to cross the plate
til they had made a total of four
d had taken the lead by a margin of
o runs.
Jntil the lucky seventh it looked as
the Maroons were going to have the
:ter of the game. Good hitting and
se running saved the day for the
aitors along with their hopes for
e championship.
Hits Hinkel Hard
MIichigan hit Hinkel hard through-
t the game, getting to him for a
al of 14 swats. The Wolverines
reed more of their runs in yester-
y's game than in any single game to
te, and made more hits than they
ve made against any Conference
char.
Errors were few, only four being
de. Three of these were chalked
against Michigan and were instru-
ntal in' the Chicago scoring. The
e made by the Maroons also aided

chigan in making one of her runs.
This game was the first baseball
re to be played between the two
pools at Chicago for many years,
i many turned out to see the old
als in action against one another.
chigan left last night for Iowa City
.ere they will play the University
Iowa team Monday.

PUBLICATION HEADS
SELECTED BY BOARD
At the meeting yesterday of the
Board in Control of Student Publica-
tions the following appointments
were made: Roy H. Fricken, '19, man-
aging editor of the Gargoyle; E.
Katherine Kilpatrick, '19, business
manager of the Inlander; Russell C.
Barnes, '20, managing editor of the
Wolverine for the coming summer.
Appointments for the 1918-19 Mich-
iganensian were not made, but J. D.
Cameron, '19, was appointed business
manager for the remainder of the se-
mester. The managing editor of the
Inlander and business manager of the
Wolverine were not appointed. It was
moved that the publication be subsi-
dized.
Salaries of the editors of the Di-
rectory, Athletic Program, and Mich-
iganensian were reduced.
OR. BAYIS TO REATE
TRAVELS IN WAR ZONE
WAS LAST CIVILIAN TO VISIT
RUINED CITIES AT
FRONT
Dr. G. T. Baylis, of New York, will
deliver a lecture on "One Thousand
Miles over the Battlefields of Eu-
rope" at 8 o'clock tonight in Hill aud-
itoium, under the direction of the
Washtenaw county Red Cross. Since
his return from Europe, Dr. Baylis
has lectured in more than two-thirds
of the states in the Union; and has
travelled more than 2,00 miles, in
the United States and Canada, on his
lecture tours.
Dr. Balis is one of the most distin-
guished speakers on the American
platform. Owing to his acquaintance
with many of the leading diplomats
of Europe, it was possible for him
to traverse forbidden territories, and
see for himself their tragic condition.
He has the honor of having declin-
ed to be the guest of the kaiser, and
was entertained by American ambas-
sadors and Cardinal Mercier. Dr. Bay-
lis was the last civilian allowed to
travel freely through ruined cities,
because of a military pass presented
him by Major General von Blissing
for the period from June 1, 1917, to
April 10, 1918.
The lecture is free and open to the
public.
ALL MEN 21 MUST
REGISTER JUNE 5
Men who have attained the age of
21 years since June 5, 1917, the first
registration day, will have to register
at the same date this eyar, according
to the local selective service board.
Youths who are absent from home
must register in sufficient time to
have their registration certified by
their home boards before June 5.
Registration for the county of
Washtenaw will take place June 5 in
the county building. Registration for
Ypsilanti, however, will be 'held in
that city.
Information about this subject may
be obtained from the county clerk's
office, telephone 34.
Professors to Talk on Harrison Works
Birge and Alexander Harrison pic-
tures will be on exhibition for the
last time this afternoon from 2 until
5:30 o'clock in Memorial hall.
Prof. L. A. Makielski will give a

gallery talk at 3 o'clock and Prof.
E. A. Barnes will speak at 4 o'clock.
The pictures are to be return'ed to the
artists on Monday.
Last Casualty List Has "23 Names
Washington, May 25. -- The army,
casualty list today contains 23 names.
Killed in action, 4; died of wounds, 4;
died of disease, 3; severely wounded,
4; slightly wounded, 8.

IWIA I LEADRS
TESTIFY AT TRIAL
Organization Cheer Germany at Se-
Cret Meet in Milwaukee When
Break Occurs
"WE CAN PUT U. S. ARMY ON
BUMB," SAYS G. J. BOURGE
Members Urge Shooting of American
Officers at Wisconsin Gathering
Place
Chicago, May 25.-Ringing declara-,
tions in favor of the German emper-
or in America, as compared with the
present administration, were made at
a meeting place of the I. W. W. in
Milwaukee after the final break with
Germany, according to testimony to-
day at the trial of 112 I. W. W. lead-
ers for seditious conspiracy.
Joseph Burdall, who said he was
forced to join the I. W. W. to safe-
guard his life, testified that G. J.
Bourge, a defendant, and other Ger-
mans who gather at the Milwaukee
hall declared I. W. W.'s "knew their
signs." That if they were drafted
they would shoot, but they would
choose their mark carefully.
'Our Bullets to Kill U. S. Officers"
"Our bullets will not strike down
the Germans, but will pierce the
necks of the American officers." Bur-
dall testified that Bourge had shouted
to the men at the meeting.
"We can put the American army
on the bumb as quickly and as effec-
tively a-s we can wreck a construc-
tion company's plant," said Bourge,
who added that members of the or-
ganization should begin by "burning
grain fields, destroying food produc-
tion plants, and wrecking munition
manufactories."
Cornell Closes College Year Early
Ithaca, N. Y., May 25. - Under-
graduates of Cornell university are
leaving for their homes, as the col-
lege year at Cornell has just ended.
The early closing is due to the fact1
that all of the vacations were short-
ened, while some of them were elim-
inated altogether.
Union Needs 150 Freshmen
One hundred and fifty freshmen are
needed by the Union carnival commit-
tee to do floor work. A meeting of all
interested will be held at 3 o'clock this
afternoon at the Union.

S'PEAKERS FOR CAP
ID. E. Heineman, '87, to Speak for
Alumni; G. F. Hurley, 'SL,
for Studenus
UNDERCLASSMEN TO GET FREE
ENTERTAINMENTS AT MOVIES

All

Classes A sked to Bring Toques to
Boxes in Observatory
Hollow

Plans for the Cap night celebration
to be held May 31 have been complet-
ed by the committee in charge and the
speakers for the evening have been
announced as follows:
David E. Heineman, '87, for the
alumni; Prof. John C. Parker, of the
engineering college, for the faculty;
and George F. Hurley, '18L, for the
student body. Gordon C. Mack, '18,
will act as master of ceremonies.
Cap night this year is expected to
be the same big University affair
which it has been in the past. All the
classes will take part, assembling on
the campus 7:30 o'clock Friday even-
ing each class in a body, and will
proceed to Observatory hollow, led by
the University band
Upper Classes to Bring Toques
Students of all classes are asked to
bring their toques with them to the
celebration to add to the collection of
cast-off "pots." They will be collect-
ed in large boxes placed at the en-
trance to the field and later shipped
to Belgium by the comforts forward-
ing league of Ann Arbor as they were
last year.
"It's a shame to waste the toques,
and the fellows would throw them in
some corner of a drawer anyway. They
are needed to overcome the present
wool shortage in the country," said
one of the members of the committee
in charge of Cap night. The fresh-
men are warned aginst mutilating
their "pots" as this would render
them useless for further wear.
Underclassmen Get Free Movies
After the celebration is over, the
freshmen and sophomore classes will
be given a customary "free movie"
entertainment at the Wuerth and Or-
pheum theatres, by the courtesy of
Mr. Wuerth, proprietor of the thea-
ters.
Tank Corps Popular at Syracuse
Syracuse, N. Y., May 25.-- Re-
cruiting for the tank corps is now go-
ing on at Syracuse university and is
proving most successful.

"TEDDY" CONDEMNS
ATTITUDE OF PAPERS
Washingto, May 25.-Charges that
the administration had used its pow-
er to stifle honest criticism, while at
the same time condemning anti-Allied
and anti-American agitation in pow-
erful newspapers, were made by The-
odore Roosevelt today in a reply to
Postmaster General Burleson, in
their controversy over the postoffice
detachment treatment of publications.
Colonel Roosevelt declared that Pres-
ident Wilson, personally, was respon-
sible for the postmaster general's at-
titude. The Hearst papers, he said,
are among those that have received
favorable treatment.
YALELAW PROFESSOR TO
TALK ON BOYS' RESERVE
AUTHOR OF ESSAYS ON MODERN
NOVELISTS TO SPEAK TO
YOUNG MEN
Professor William L. Phelps, of
Yale university, will speak at 7:15
o'clock Monday evening in Hill audi-
torium on the boys' working reserve.
He is said to be one of the most bril-
liant and clever lecturers in the coun-
try.
Professor J. B. Waite of the Law
school, in speaking of Professor
Phelps, remarked, "When I was an
undergraduate at Yale in 1905, Pro-
fessor Phelps was one of the most
popular members of the faculty and
was known to everybody as 'Billy'
Phelps. This popularity was largely
due to his possession of an unlimited
supply of humorous stories and anec-
dotes which he was able to tell in a
very descriptive manner."
Professor Phelps has written a con-
siderable number of clever essays on
modern novelists. His keen sense of
humor is illustrated in "A Dash at
the Pole," which was written by him
shortly after Dr. Cook's return to this
country with the story of his discov-
ery of the North Pole. He has also
edited a number of books on litera-
ture.
His talk will be directed to young
men interested in the boys' working
reserve and to those wishing to en-
roll in the public service reserve. The
Glee club will supplement the pro-
gram with vocal sefections.
PROF. ISAACS TO
ADDRESS MENORAH
"Legalism in Jewish History" will
be the subject of an address which
Professor Nathan Isaacs, assistant
dean of the University of Cincinnati
law school, will give at 8 o'clock to-
night in Newberry hall before the
Menorah society.
Professor Isaacs is one of the
prominent young men in the law pro-
fesion today, according to Prof. J. H.
Drake, of the law school, who is ac-
quainted with him. He has written
numerous articles on legal subjects
for law reviews, including the Michi-
gan and Harvard Law Review. H is
a graduate of both the Harvard lit-
erary college and law school.
G. A. R. to Attend Church Service
Local members of the G. A. R. will
attend the morning service at the
Congregational church in a body. The
Rev. L. C. Douglas will speak on
"Soldiers-Emeritus." Patriotic music
will be rendered by an augmented

choir.

Union Secures lTar-famed Jyphalo
As BMg Drawing Card for Carnival
The wonderful byphalo which has been creating such an uproar in
the East has been engaged by the Michigan Union for its carnival to be
held Wednesday and Thursday evenings in the combined gymnasiums.
Negotiations have been under way for some time to bring the celebrat-
ed animal to Ann Arbo', and the Union committee has at last been suc-
cessful in securing engagement dates. Both days of the contest the byphalo
will be the chief attraction of the carnival. It is expected that the animal
will arrive in time to take part in the parade which will be held Tues-
day.
Proceeds for Soldiers
The proceeds of the carnival will be given to the Michigan bureau of
the American University Union in Paris. This institution needs a consid-
erable sum of mcney to support it for the American soldiers, and the local
Union hopes to raise a considerable sum for the praiseworthy work. Every
cent taken in for the carnival shows will be turned over to the Paris Un-
ion.
Construction Work Progressing
The construction work of building the booths and exhibit buildings is
well under way. A large committee under Roy Elliott, '18E, is working at
the gymnasiums daily to get the necessary structures completed before
Wednesday. About $300 will- be spent for this work and general decorations.
Two more fraternities 'have taken booths, Delta Chi and Theta Delta
Chi. Alpha Tau Omega has given up .its booth.
Committees for Carnival
The carnival committees are as follows: General chairman, D. M.
Springer, '19E; side shows and concessions, F. C. Bell, '19; W. Blakeslee,
'20; D. F. Fagerburg, '20; D. K. Mirrielees, '20A; construction, R. Elliott,
'18E; N. S. Yost, '18A; L. J. Schindler, '20E; S. P. Lowe, '18E; F. W. Par-
sons, '20E; W. R. Frazer, '20E; publicity, R. G. Yerkes, '20; W. Leitzinger,
'20; C. R. Osius, Jr., '20; R. Bachman, '20; J. J. Reilly, '18; P. E. Cholette,
'19; J. W. Robertson, '20; tickets, C. T. Hogan, '20E; M. A. Cudlip, '19; Ruth
Connely, '18; C. B. Campbell, '19E; parade, J. H. Broderick, '19.

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Student Council to Meet
There will be a meeting of the
Student council at 8 o'clock Mon-
day evening at the Union.

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R. H.E.
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PHELPS

LECTURE

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Hill

Auditorium

To Stimulate Student Interest in
THE PUBLIC SERVICE RESERVE

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