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May 25, 1918 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-05-25

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DAY, MAY 25, 1918.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGN

NEXT THREE GAES TO
DECIDE BIG TEN TITE
UUZICKA BEING RELIED ON FOR
A GREAT SHARE OF COMING
BATTLES
Weather permitting, and other ele-
ments equally favorable, the Michi-;
gan baseball squad now at Chicago
will attempt to prove this afternoon
that they are better baseball players
than the Windy city team with whom
they have split even so far this sea-
son. . ;,
The game this afternoon is the first
of the last three Conference games
the Wolverines have on their sched-
ule, the other two coming Monday
and Tuesday at Iowa City and Ur-
bana, respectively. Ruzicka, who has
already beaten the Chicago team
once, is scheduled to hurl this aft-
ernoon so that he may have time to
rest up for the Illinois game, the one
that may decide the Conference title.
Captain Glenn, although his arm is
not as good as it was at the begin-
ning of the season, hopes to pitch
against Iowa, Monday.
Have Three Hard Games
Without a doubt the Wolverines
have the three hardest games of the
season still before them, in spite of
the fact that they have beaten two
of the teams and split even with the
third. Barring reinjury of his knee or
a bad day Ruzicka should win both
of his games which will make the
Maize and Blue winners of the cham-
pionship. He has to outpitch the best
hurler cf the Big Ten, Klein of Illi-
nois, to do this.
If Glenn is in shape he should be
able to hold the Iowa crew down, so
that his teammates can collect enough
hits and runs to put the second of the
three games on ice. Hamilton, who
will undoubtedly oppose him, is not a
liberal man when it comes to hand-
ing out hits and walks so Bob will
have to do some real hurling.
Title Rests on Hurlers
Perhaps never in the history of the
Conference has the title rested so
completely on the relative merits of
pitchers. College ball fans in the cen-
tral west are looking forward to threes
pitchers' battles equal to or better
than any they have ever witnessed.
Neither of the four teams taking
part in the games of the next four
days can be confident of victory, not
even Michigan who has won from
them all for her victories were in
games that showed that her oppo-
nents were real baseball players. The
breaks, to a certain extent, favored
the Maise and Blue in her victories
and every ,supporter of the present
leaders of the Conference is hoping
that lightning may for once strike
twice in'the same place.
Lundgren Versus Huff
Lundgren himself is . not entirely
confident of winning all three of the
games but he does have hopes of be-
ing victorious enough to accomplish
the end which he hasworked for, the
winning of the title.
A peculiar feature of the race this
year is that the Michigan coach is
proving or disproving that he is a
better man than his former master,
George Huff. The former Cub pitch-
er, the present Wolverine mentor,
learned his first baseball of the Illi-
nois coach. Now comes the test of
whether or not he has learned more
than the man who has turned out
more Big Ten champions than any
other single individual.
The Michigan Batting Averages

WOMEN'S CONTESTS
TO BE HELD TODAY
Women's Field Day will take place
at 1:30 o'clock this afternoon on
Palmer field, and at 3 o'clock the con-
test will shift to the field across from
Barbour gymnasium. In case of rain,
the military marching exhibition and
the final cup game will be held at 4
o'clock, Monday afternoon; tennis and
archery, coming at 4 o'clock, Tuesday
afternoon.
On account of rain the last tennis
matches have not been played off.
Those who are still in the contest are:
Mary Copeland, '18; Dorothy Newell,
'19; and Hilda DeBar,'19; Grace Hall,
'20; and Lucile Hoffman, '20; Maxine
.Stevens, '21; and Margaret Rottschaef-
er. There will be some tennis con-
test today,.although the finals will
probably be played the first part of
next week.
Archery on Prograni
Archery which will count for both
class and individual honor is next on
the program. Those contesting are:
Freda Wedmeger, '18; May Sanders,
'18; Adelaide Adams, '20; Helen Camp-
bell, '20; Ruth Diebel, '20; Dorena
Norton, '20; Dora Osterderg, '20; and
Gretchen Jones, '20. Dorothy True,
'21; Gladys Strickland, '21; Mercile
Seery, '21; Marjorie Post, 21; Marion
Handley, '21; and Alvira Bellows.
The military marching class will
continue the sports at 3 o'clock on the
field across from Barbour gymnasium.
Regular girl soldiers are the expecta-
tions of every one, because of their
earnest drilling. A baseball game,
between freshmen and juniors will de-
cide which class is the winner of the
athletic cup. Those on the junior
team are: Lucile Duff, c; Emily Lo-
man, p; Phyllis Eggleston, ss; Emma
Riggs, 1b; Helen Davis 2b; Ethel
Glauz, 3b; Dorothy Sample, rf; Mar-
cis Pinkerton, ef; and Mary Morse, lf.
On the freshman team are: Helen
DeIf, c; Phyllis Wiley, ss; Margaret
Rottschaefer, p; Alice Hingson, lb;
Alice Beckham, 2b; Cornelia Clark,
3b; Katrina Schermerhorn, rf; Uegen-
ia Wart, cf; and Eliza McRobb. If.
After the game, athletic.honors con-
sisting of arm bands, sweaters, and
pins, will be awarded.

MICHIGAN AND MAROONS
MEET FOR SECOND TIME
WOLVERINES' CHANCES FOR WIN-
NINE( MEET ARE UNUSUALLY
GOOD)
Michigan meets Chicago in the sec-
ond dual track and field meet be-
tween the two teams this season this
afternoon at Stagg field, and chances
for a Maize and Blue victory are
bright.
With Johnson, the Wolverine star,
in the high and low hurdles, 100 yard
dash, and the broad jump, Michigan
is sure of at least four firsts for a
total of 20 points, and if Steve de-
cides to use Johnson in the high
jump, .tnother would be taken. This.
event is well taken care of by twol
capable men, Latir and Haigh, and if
Johnson goes into this contest, the
Wolverines should make a clean
sweep of the high jump.
Should Take 100 Yard Dash

very strong in the clashes,.
Chicago is also weak in the pole
vault, and Cross should cop withj

best chance of coping first place,{
while the Wolverine captain, who is
not yet in first class shape, may do

little difficulty. Baker is a sure win- some good work if the weather con-
ner in the shot put, but ij ihe other ditions are favorable.
weight events, Coach Stagg has sev-
eral good athletes. His hammer -d lk Crit.c
thrower is considered one of the
best mnthe Conference, having ex- # 1
ceeded Latir's best mark by about 20 Objects to tOry
feet. The discus performers of both ----_
teams are evenly matched, making EDITOR'S NOTE-We wish to as-
the winner hard to pick. sure the writer, who signs himself
C'hicago Picked for Javelin "Sidewalk Critic," that we have dis-
The javelin throw should go to the missed- the reporter who was respon-
Windy City team, as Chicago has a sible for the feature. story, appearing
crack man in hurling the long stick. in the -disguise of the communica-
Baker will have little trouble in tak- tion, of which he speaks. Any more
ing second. Messner will have to go attempts by our staff to produce sim-
up against some of the best quarter ilar articles will not be conducive to
milers in the West. Feuerstein is a rapid promotion.)
51 second man, while the best the
Maize and Blue runner has done is a Sporting Editor, Michigan Daily.
fraction slower than 52 seconds. Ohi- Dear Sir:
cago has several other good athletes I think of all the communications
in the same event. that have appeared in the columns of
The half mile is also conceded to the Daily, the one day before yester-
the Maroons. Coach Stagg has Mc- day was the limit for lack of judg-
Cosh, Greene, and other fast runners ment of the writer. One would think

very poor sort, and the spirit that
pervaded the article with reference
to the attendance of the women of the
university at games, was ungentle-
manly. I wonder now whether "yours
truly" wore a wrist watch, and had
his monogram embroidered promiscu-
ously about his wearing apparel.
What with the new athletic train-
ing the gentler sex is being given,
and their usual inherent ability to
learn the rudiments of things quickly,
there are very few who do not fol-
low the game intelligently. The at-
tendance of the co-eds at games this
year has been splendid, and we are
sure that they at least do not cast re-
marks at visiting players as has been
I done.
Their use of elaborate adjectives in
commenting on a play is a "poetic li-

z
E

cense" of the sex, and we are sure
that the presence of more of them at
the games will not detract from the
value of the game. Anyone who is
paralyzed and cannot see over the hat
of some lady in front of him, will find
her lady enough and good sport
enough to remove it at the slightest
suggestion on his part. Those who
aren't paralyzed, and who have their
neck muscles intact, can generally
see if they want to, or else move to
another seat.
THE SIDEWALK CRITIC.

In the 100 yard dash, Cook should who have been negotiating the dis-
follow his temmate, Johnson, to the tance in fast time. Buell will do well
tape, as he is faster than Annan, the to finish thir'd.
best the Maroons have entered, hav- Captain Donnelly and Sedgwick
ing beaten the Windy City runner in will have a lot of stiff competition in
the indoor meet. Cook should win the long distances. Sedgwick has the

that any able-bodied male person who
was so unfortunate as to sit behind
"Mrs. Brown's hat," and remained
there when the bleachers are so large,
deserves not to have seen anything.
The attempt at sarcasm was of a

U;

I'

I

YESTERDAY'S

GAMES

Name A.B.
Scheidler ..............1
Mraz...... ..........44
Morrison ............25
Knode.......... .....33
Genebach . ............27
Ohlmacher . ..... .....39
Bowerman . ........... 4
Cooper . ...............44
Garrett. . ..............41
Gilmartin . ............20
Adams . ..............46
Ruzicka....... .....12
Saunders..............6
Langenhan. . ..... ....12
Glenn...............16

H.
1
15
7
9
7
10
1
10
9
4
8
2
0
0
0

P.C.
1.000
.340
.280
.272
.259
.256
.250
.227
.219
.200
.174
.167
.000
.000
.000

American League
Detroit, 2; Washington, 2; (16 in-
nings, darkness.)
St. Louis, 9; Philadelphia, 8.
Cleveland, 3; New York, 2; (19 in-
nings.)
Boston, 5; Chicago, 4.
National .League
New York-Chicago game postponed,
rain.
Cincinnati, 2; Philadelphia, 1; (11
innings.)
Boston, 6; Pittsburg, 3.
St. Louis, '; Brooklyn, 2; (12 in-
nings.)
Minnesota Is Entered in Mass Sports
Contrary to earlier statements from
Minnesota University, the Gopher
school is to enter a team in the mass
athletics games of Big Ten colleges
to be held next Saturday. Instead of
a team of 300 participants, the orig-
inal number required, Minnesota will
enter only 200.
Badger Co-ed Makes Record Throw
Miss Gladys Palmer, a co-ed at the
University of Wisconsin, broke the
woman's world's record for throwing
a regulation sized baseball, when she
hurled the pill 215 feet 11 inches. She
also came .within eight feet of the
woman's javelin record at the same
time.
Illinois Captain Enters Service
Chester Kreidler, captain of the
Illinois track team, enlisted today in
the Ensign school in Chicago. Kreider
is one of the main cogs of the Illini
track and field machine. He is the
third captain to enlist from the
Champaign school this year.
Joe Hanish Becomes Father
Joseph Hanish, '19, one of Yost's
stars, and a member of the Phi Kap-
pa Sigma fraternity, is the father of
an eight pound son, Robert Joseph.
Mrs. Hanish, nee Deryl .Brandstetter,
'16, is a member of the Delta Delta
Delta sorority.
Boat Race to Be Held at 6 O'clock
Yale and Harvard will hold their
annual crew race at 6 o'clock in the
evening this year. The race is sched-
uled to be held on the Housatonic,
June 1.
Our Merchant Advertisers represent
the progressive business men of Ann
Arbor.-Adv.
Base Ball Supplies-all kinds at
Cushing'syAdv.
Use The Daily Classified columns. .

A

AL

r
i

MEN!

SA

VE

$1

TO

$2

ON YOUR

NeKinney, '16, to Train at Annapolis
Francis F. McKinney, '16, managing
editor of The Daily in 1915-16, will
enter Annapolis within a week to train
for a commission in the navy.
McKinney enlisted in the navy in
April, 1916, and was appointed a
yoeman. He served for a time in the
fire control division of the U. S. S.
Arizona, but was sent to the naval
training school at Pelham Bay Park,
N. Y. a short time ago. His appoint-
ment to the military academy at An-
napolis comes as a reward for profici-
ency shown in his work up to this
time.
Dancing Friday nights at the Arm-
ory.-Adv.

NEW

SPRING

On account of War conditions which we did not figure on when we made heavy pur-
chases last year we find we have far too many shoes on shelves and college will soon
close hence the big reductions we are offering on every pair of
BOSTONIAN and FLORSHEIM SHOES and OXFORDS
Just received a big shipment Plain Toe Cordovan Oxfords SA LE PRICE $8.45

CAMP US

B O OTERY

I I'-

1

_ .

I7 Ik T

'u~u~r't A i

h A Th AT111CTIThI

121 E. WASHINGTON

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