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July 16, 1927 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1927-07-16

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Y, JULY 16, 1927

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY

C,

J

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BOOKS OF THE DAY

FIRST CHURCH OF
CHRIST, SCIENTIST

(

The Marionette, by Edwin Muir 181
pages; The Viking Press. $1.75.
Poetry in prose, dream-stuff in mere
words-this is the essence in an off-
hand way of The Marionette. It will
appeal to those in whom there is that
fine quality, sensing as they read.
But to no others. Your rabid one
with the taste for adventure will not
find it sated here, nor will he who
seeks realism and manners of the age.
In one peculiar way the work is simi-
lar to that of James Stephens; it is
soul-satisfying. Stephens sweeps his
reader away from his seat and soars
with him through the clouds and for-1
ests of Irish folk-lore, while the feet
of neither touch the ground. In fact
they glory in keeping away from it.
The~ English critic and poet has chosen
a far different subject and characters,
but one cannot help but feel that the
mind that enjoys the one would find1
satisfaction in the other.
The beginningsare anchored in the]
flesh, and the first picture of the
feeble-minded boy and his embittered
father is pathetic in its searching mis-
ery. There is probably nothing in life
quite so difficult for the ordinary mor-
tal to combat or understand as men-
tal delinquency or distortion. It was.
a long time before Martin Scheffer
could behold his idiot offspring as any-j
thing but a reminder of the mother
who had given her life in the bearing.
But time and the efforts of an anxious!
servant wrought a change, and he be-
gan to grope for a means of rescuing(
that poor bit of humanity from fearl
and helplessness.
For Hans, the boy, all of life and
mov.ement was frighteful, it was de-
sikned for his destruction, and at thel
slightest evidence of it he would crawl
into protecting cell sand .seek amuse-
ment in those things that were always
hard and constant. Rough, hard edgesI
were his ballast in life. Terror track-
ed him through the streets of the little
German town to the very door of the
marionette theater, but there he found
a revelation. Delighted, suspicious, heI
could view a life which was enoughI
WILL CIVE CHESS EXHIBITION
All who are interested in chess are
invited to an exhibition of simultane-
ous play by William T. Adams, '17,
former Michigan chess team captain,
at the Faculty club this evening. Mr.
Admas will play as many boards as
there are contestants and several
games afterwards.
Prof. Louis C. Karpinski, of thel
Mathematics department, will be tend-
ered a dinner when he returns from
Europe sometime in August. This
will be followed by match play with aj
team from the Army and .Navy club
of Detroit.

distant from his sphere to warrant
safety., The development of the hu-
man and childish trait of imagination,
always held by the finest of threads
and the utmost parental perseverence,
is a thing of beauty and wonder as
Muir spins it out, and the eventual
crash into' the first oblivion is as deso-
lating to the reader as it must have
been to the father.
Once during the narrative the author
strikes something that brings one back
suddenly tpi reality. Hans--at the
peak of his discovery, groping for life
in the personification of the wooden
dolls-,comes intimately into contact
with one of them, feels its glassy im-
potence, its lack of reality, and senses
that he has been cheated. What a hu-
man discovery that is!
Muir is proclaimed by his publish-
ers as poet and critic of high rank,
and a certain expectancy is thought
to be paramount in regard to his first
work of fiction. The Marionette,
never pretending to sensationalism,
combines delicacy with sensual color,
thereby offsetting its basic fault of
being uninteresting. It is in truth a
small book for a small group, but that
group will hub it to its breast.
-K. G. P.
CHICAGO MUSIC
UNION BREAKS
UP ORCHESTRA
CHICAGO, July 15.-Failure of the
Chicago Symphony Orchestra associa-
tion to reach an agreement with the
Musicians' union on a matter of wages
Thursday resulted in the disbandment
of the orchestra as far as its parent
association is concerned.
The musicians, following the an-
nouncement of the intention to dis-
band by the association, siid they
would keep the orchestra intact and
produce under other sponsors.
Charles H. Hamill, president, made
the announcement that the orchestra
would ,disband.immediately. Mr. Ham-
ill declared the musicians could not
have the name, nor use Orchestra
hall. Both, he.said, would remain the
property of the association.
Meanwhile, the charter of the asso-
ciation will permit it to engage in
other musical activities.
Asked if the action would mean that
Frederick A. Stock,. the conductor,
would be lost to Chicago, Mr. Hamill
said, "I hope not."
James C. Petrillo, president of the
union, said several wealthy men "were
willing to finance equally long sea-
sons and pay salaries starting at $125
a week, to be raised every two years."
The present minimum is $80 a week.
The union wanted an increase of $20
a week, which was refused.

10:30 A. M.-Regular morning ser-
vice, subject: "Life."
11:45 A. M.-Sunday school follow-
ing the morning service.

7:45;-Wednesday evening
nonial meeting.

testi-

The Reading room, 10 and 11
State Savings Bank building, is
open daily from 12 to 5 o'clock,
except Sundays and legal holidays.
ITHE UNITARIAN CHURCH

FIRST METHODIST
Cor. State and Washington
Arthur W. Stalker, D.D., Minister
Parley C. Bingham, Associate
Minister and Student Director
Margaret Stair, Student Director
10:30 A. M. -Morning worship.
Sermon, "Gladdened by Good-
ness," by Rev. Marshall Reed of
Detroit.
12:00-Student Bible Class at Wes-
ley Hall.
6:00 P. M.-Student Devotional
meeting.
8:00 P. M.-Evening Church Ser-
vice. Question Box and ser-
mon by Rev. Parley Bingham.
ST. ANDREW'S
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
0i sion and Catherine Streets
Fifth Sunday After Trinity
Rev. Henry Lewis, Rector; Rev.
Thomas L. Harris, Assistant
8:00 A. M.-Holy Communion

i

State and Huron Sts.
Sidney S. Robins, Minister

10:45 a. m.-Morning Service. Last
Sunday before vacation.
REV. .J. T. SUNDERLAND, D.D.

Dr. Sunderland

is a

"Evolution and Religion'
Origin and Character
Bible."

uthor of
and "The
of the

11: OQ A. M.-Morning
Sermon by the
Lewis.
4-6 P. M.-Musicale
Harris Hall.

Prayer and
Rev. Henry
and Tea in

PRESBYTERIAN
Huron and Division Streets
Merle H. Anderson, Minister
9:30-Church Bible School.

i

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
H. Edward Sayles, Minister
9: (0--bible School.
10:45-Morning worship. Sermon
subject: "Freedom Through
Christ." Mr.Sayles will preach.

10:45-Rev. Warren E. #.all
Wyandotte preaches.

of

II

11

5:30-Social hour and supper for
student group.

6:30-Young
meeting.

People's Society

12:40--Class
church,

for
led. by

students in
Mr. Sayles.

i

I.

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MICHIGAN BELL
TELEPHONE CO,

Long Distance Telephone
Service Speeds Business for SPARTON

IE 5wIRKw-W
M- Nfra a.. J. i~le m.

- Ot -
K et .14

Vlith1an 3.11 rSIeplaOeCaWe~.
i'icweatta U. 4etl Mb?.

4
T o get th e m,
full of vitalit
muscle worki
key to it.-T
help you to 1
throw off th
ness. You'll
eaten half a
fruit and cr
and hot mil
THE SHREI
N
,yry

it seessanocseau M W9.14 p%166.56*si- o
doubtedly yourr erds .wil l oa. US as ea n g me3406
distance aqrfle me .tha we have over Sfon La ear
We fiod this service eapwislly belpfel is gU.-
log innetracls nd 0passing mnfe:.atioa to.out re% tsa
aanager3 located in TrongueWn aof the OOnmte', where .
miltake, from fory-eightto10sixtyhous*
t4.1als an* to congrttulte you the l.res~t W
provemeat 1n service during the past year. end feel rasa
our ass of the 100481ditance will be omeapoerse:the 16
Soars vary truy.
TH A GTx C A
oreI et rl ,"

GET it all. Don't miss
any of it, the .dizzy
lights and party-colored
frocks; stepping to the
frenzied blare of saxo-
phones; senses tingling
with being alive and in
the midst of it all. And
next day-instructors who
are likable but exacting.
ost out of college you must be
y, must have every nerve and
ng full time. Right food is the
he Shredded Wheat habit will
nake mind and body alert and
e poisons that bring sluggish-
I like it, too. It's appetizing
hundred ways; smothered in
ream or toasted with butter
ilk are just two of them.
DDED WHEAT COMPANY
Niagara Falls, N. Y.
REDDED
HEATN

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