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July 09, 1927 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1927-07-09

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BOO

KS OF

. - - . . . . . . . .

God's Trombones-James Weldon
Johnson, (The Viking Press-$2.50.)
A great deal has been written on
the folk creations of the American Ne-
gro, his music, plantation tales and
dances, and James Weldon Johnson
has been responsible for a good deal
of it. Now he has collected and veri-
fled seven old Negro sermons in an
unusual volume printed in gold and
black with striking illustrations by
Aaron Douglas.
Mr. Johnson, in a very conversa-
tional preface, or "puff" as Hogarth
would have called such a prologue,1
modestly states as his aim, the pre-
servation in permanent form the
spirit of the old fashioned Negro
preachers, a species of person fasts
becoming extinct. The typical ser-
mon began, with the creation and
worked up to the fall of man, his
trials and tribulations in bondage, the
redemption of Christ and ended final-1
ly with the judgment day and an om-
inous warning to sinnners to know
where they stood "In that great day
when God's a-going to rain down
fire?"
The author of "God's Trombones"
has taken the essence of the outstand-
ing sermons that he remembers from
childhood and has recreated them in
rhythmic verse .e has purposely
kept them out of dialect because of
the nowessary connotation with pa-
+ lus or humor which accompanies it.
The metre, as far as its free treat-
ment can be called metre, is success-
fully accomodated to the spirt of the*
sermons and although, much of the
depth of the old Negro sermons de-
pended upon the colour of the voice
intonations, still much of the effect
of those intonations is preserved in
the verse form. It is effective in its
pause, its hesitations, and its long
and hurried passages leading up to
the inevitable exhortation.
The first poem entitled "Listen
Lord," is the .invocation or prayer be-
gnnuing,
"O Lord, we come this morning
Knee-bowed and body-bent
Before thy throne of grace.
O Lord-this morning-
Bow our heart beneath our knees,
And our knees in some lonesome val-
ley.
We come this morning-
Like empty pitchers to a full foun-
tain,
With no merits of our own."

piece of work and unlike so many
modern books, more than fulfills its
TH__EDAYIacknowledged aim. Mr. Johnson is
an earnest student of Negro folk-lore
._._.______.__.__ ..__ --._.__ -... and music, being the editor of two
He goes on with a eulogistic praise volumes of Negro Spirituals. He isJ
to the Lord and an entreaty for him interested in the Negro as a race and
to "mount your snow-white horse" has termed himself an "ex-colored
and ride by this morning. It is sim- man" in his autobiography. He has a
ple and homely simile but somewhere rational, common-sense view of the
between the lines and in them lurks colored man's problem and has in his
the spirit of the old preacher and autobiography, presented an analysis
more-poetry that is inspired even of it frankly and openly.
though the theme is borrowed. All of which is but a verification of
Typical of the quaintness of the the statement that Mr. Johnson is
volume is the opening of the poem fitted to catch the inspirational es-
entitled "The Prodigal Son." sence of those things portraying the
"Young man- soul of the Negro. If we may sepa-
Young man- rate form and content, which is not,
Your arm's too short to box with God." however necessary, we would place
And the casual observation in the wreaths of laurealate commendation
middle of "Noah Built the Ark:" upon both, for "God's Trombones" is
"Man first fell by woman- esentially characteristic rhythmical
Lord, and he's doing the same today." I and artistic.
"God's Trombones" is an exquisite I -M. L. W..

DREW FIGHTS OFF DEATH
PHYSICIANS MYSTIFIED
(By Associated Press)
N FRANCISCO, July 8.-John{
Drew, wean of the American stage,
continued yesterday to stave off the1
advance of death which physicians al-
most two days ago predicted would
overtake him in 48 hours.
The vitality of the 73-year-old actor,
who has been fighting arthritis andE
septic poison for more than a month,
has hystified his doctors.
Drew slept nearly all day yesterday.
His mind was clear in his waking
moments. He passed a fairly com-
fortable night, and hospital attaches,
declared that he would live anotherl
day.

i
1
l
I
7.
1
1

WOMEN'S LEAGUE -COMBI"
WILL EN ° A FM T
FOR M)S R
The Women's Leaue of the Univ s ah oIIiifliri dtlW dntoU ltinqan
sity will hold an informal reception fliVfatibAiJMfd An iech in
for Miss Elsie Herndon Kearns, of the the sa rt t i1if e1{piio:&fI f1 m8J,
Rockford Players, next Wednesday af- opened their three day sta isADef
ternoon in the parlors of Barbour troit yesterday. Th-mshows aU MLh
gymnasium. Tea v. ill be served by largest circus now touringIaiaildn4lV
the League. Womnr: in all schools are sacred elephant is the first of hid&ind
invited to attend. The daily teas, from ever brought to the United States, it
4 to 5:30 o'clo(&, a:e proving quite is claimed.
popular, but there is room as well as ! Detroit is one of the six cities of
welcome for many more women. The the country in which the circus will
class in natural ,!.n.ing which meets play three days, having opened yes-
at that hour p.3vid*,s entertainment treday and continuing with perform-
for those attending. !ances today and tomorrow.

.llll iav. .. .,., ....,......, .

FIRST CHURCH OF
CHRIST, SCIENTIST

uvu a .+. a vau r. vaaca as cyu c aK usaayc;

SPEND SUNDAY ON THE RIVER
pack your lunch basket and paddle away to the many
quiet, peaceful and secluded spots on the banks of the
Huron.

I

10:30 A. M.-Regular morning ser-
vice, subject: "Sacrameit."
11:45 A. M.-Sunday school follow-
ing the morning service.

FIRST METHODIST
10:30 A M . orning worship.
Sermon: '1 he Mind of Chris
Sermon: "The Mind of
Christ," by Dr. Eugene Allen.
12:00 M.-Student Bible Class at\
Wesley Hall.
6:00 P. M.-Wesleyan Guild de-
votional service for students
at Wesley Hall.
8 : 00 P. M.-Evening church ser-
vice. Sermon: "Men of God."
Pulpit editorial: "The Major
Beliefs of the Methodist
Church:"

v

ST. ANDREW'S
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Division and Catherine Streets
Rev. henry Lewis, Rector
FOURTh SUNDAY AFTER
TRINITY

I

7:45-Wednesday evening
monial meeting.

testi-

7 - - -
SAUNDER'S CANOE LIVERY
By the Hour, Day or Season. Huron River at Cedar St.

The Reading room, 10 and 11
State Savings Bank building, is
open daily from 12 to 5 o'clock,
except Sundays and legal holidays.

8:00 A. M.-Holy Communion.
11:00 A. M.--oly Communion and
sermon by Rev. Henry Lewis.
4:00-6:00-Musical program at
Harris Hall

II

11

!

II

PRESBYTERIAN
Huron amnd Division Streets
Merle H. Anderson, Minister
9:30-Church Bible School.'
10:45--Dr. Anderson preaches on
"God's Mighty WIhisperilgs."
Summer coniniunion service.
:30---Social hour and supper for
student group.

THE UNITARIAN CHURCH

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
R. EIward Sayle , Minister

State and Huron Sts.
Sidney S. Robins, Minister

Sunday, July 3, 1927

9 : 30--Bible School.

10:45 A. M.

To all men who make a

hobby of pipes

"The Story of American Liberal.
im-Darwin an" unmai"n.
This church will be open until
and including July 17. A cordial
welcome is extended to students
in the :limmer School, for the
next three Sundays.

10:45-Morning worship.
sub] ect: "Eternally
Ideals." Mr. Sayles will

Sermon
Valid
preach.

G : 70-Yoiung
meeting.

People's Society1

.
J
-0 Nr
J

r
.

12:40-Class for students in
church, led by Mr. Sayles.

--.-

III

._
:.: s
' .
.,

HALLER'S

State Street

Jewelers

T 1

:~~ i

YOU

The Graduating Seniors
Are facing the question
of
"WHAT TO DO
NEXT"
Somec of you are well, fixed; you
have a family business to work
with. It will be to your interest
to think about the new develop-
ment, Group Insurance, which will
be a factor of increasing impor-
tance in the relations of your
business to its employees.
Some of you have a decided bent,
and are going to follow it. One
way of making sure that you will
finish the course of life you have
chosen is to take advantage of
Annuity, Endowment, and Straight
Life Insurance.
Some of you ha worked fo
your education and must earn as
much money as you can, as quickly
as possible. The selling of Life
Insurance gives the most and
quickest return for hard work: it
also offers the greatest freedom for
original enterprise. It is not a
push-button job. The John Han-
cock is looking for men like you
and would like to hear from you.
Write to us in regard to any of
these points. We shall answer
your inquiries without any ob-
ligation to you. Address the
INQUIRY BUREAU.
C. 11L E PIU RAMNCE COMPANY".
197 Clarendon St., Boston, Mass.
If your policy bears the name
John Hancock, it is safe and
secure in every way.

MAYBE you've spent half your life and
fortune on this old hobby-collecting
everything from peace-pipes down to the
latest "L and Maria" underslung. Maybe
you know the pipe encyclopedia from
amber Americanus to Zula zuago..
But if you're a pipe smoker, you learned
long ago that no matter how much a
man may know about trick pipes and
pipe tricks what he gets out of any pipe
depends on what he puts in it.
And if you know your tobaccos, you
know that any pipe's a sweeter smoke
when packed with grand and glorious
old Granger Rough Cut.. . The finest
Burley that grows, mellowed Wellman's
way and specially cut for pipes...
A man may have a hundred pipes but
he needs only one tobacco... and that's
Granger. For whether you put it in a
meerschaum or a corn-cob, Granger is al-
ways the same cool, sweet tobacco...
worthy of any pipe in the world.
GRANGE.R
ROUGH CUT

' E

11

Made
for pipes only!

Granger Rough Cut is made by the Liggett & Myers T'obacco Company

11

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