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July 06, 1927 - Image 1

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Michigan Daily, 1927-07-06

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SUBSCRIBE
FOR THE
DAILY

*A C r

4:Iai1

MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

VOL. VIII, No. 9.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, JULY 6, 1927

PRICE FIVE CENTS

RUPTURE OR COMPACT
RESTS UPON BRITAIN
IN NAVAL CONFERENCE
UNITED STATES IWV L MEET
ENGLISH CRUISER NEEDS
IF POSSIBLE
BRITISH DENY REPORTS
Delegate Describes Dangerous Aspect
In Regard To Interseption
Of Food Supplies
(By Associated Press)
GENEVA, July 5.-A crucial stage
has been reached in the Tri-partite
naval conference. Whether events at
this critical turning point push the
pourparler toward the actual rupture
or toward an actual treaty undoubted-
ly depends chiefly on Great Britain.
The United States today, actuated,
it is said, by a conciliatory desire to
understand British cruiser needs and
meet them as far as possible, practi-t
cally told the naval delegates that it;
would go to the extreme maximum7
limit of 400,000 tons, which is 100,000
tons more than the maximum for
cruisers contained in the original
American proposal, but strongly in-
dicated simultaneously that that it
would exert continued effort to put
limitation well under 400,000 tons.
The sudden American initiative in-
duced W. C. Brideman, first lord of the
British admiralty, to receive the press
representatives tonight and to them
he vigorously denied reports that
Great Britain was animated by ag-
gressive design in asking for a large
number of small cruisers. He describ-
ed Great Britain as a country in con-
stant danger of interception of food
supplies and remarked that during the
war 70 .cruisers were occupied in
chasing the German raider Andem,
with 29 at her heels one time, before
she was "run to earth."
Mr. Bridgeman's answer to one
question confirmed the impression
that the conference now is actually on
the border of a precipice. The ques-
tion was: "Do you consider the
chances fo rthe success of the con-
ference better now-than on the first
day?"

ABLE PERFORMANCE IS NOTABLE
IN LAST NIGHT OF "HAY FEVER"
A Review, by Philip C. Brooks

Perhaps the critic wasn't "sitting
forward expectant," as those did who
reviewed Judith Bliss' plays, but cer-
tainly he was most intensely amused
by "Hay Fever," and decidedly im-
pressed by the able presentation given
the piece by the Rockford Players.
Between charming Helen Hughes, the
"vigorous ingenue of 19," delightful-
ly natural in interpretation, and Elsie
Herndon Kearns, as "an extremely
nice woman-more or less," in com-
pany with a cast who seemed almost
without exception to fit their roles
admirably, one could not help but
like the performance.
From the development of the situa-
tion 'at the start, rather slow but still
interesting, to the crashing of the
plate and Miss Kearns' stupendous
declaration at the end, excessive
laughter was the only thing that
threatened to tire the audience. The
play is attractive not for depth of
plot but for remarkably clever lines,
developing situations which while for
the most part quite obvious, are unique
and extremely funny. " It gave the
Players opportunity to do their work
Designer Of Planes

with freedom, not having to fear over-
playing, for the whole thing is so rol-
licking and hilarious that "anything
goes"-tempered of course by the dis-
cretion for which the group is not-
able.
Amy Loomis, whether majestic as
Great Catherine or serenely unso-
phisticated as Jackie Coryton, demon-
strates a refinement of interpretation,
a finesse, which places her above all,
except for Miss Kearns, who profits
by more experience. The latter show-
ed in 'Hay Fever" her characterictic
precision of tone and expression,
making her work convincing to the
utmost.
Helen Hughes, playing her first role
at Michigan, lived up to all the exces-
sive praise her previous notices gave
her. Besides being attractive, she ap-
peared as a competent and able act-
ress. Frances Horine, in a part which
fitted her neatly, performed with an
excellence which should appease
those who did not like her in "The
Butter and Egg Man."1
Having taken the ladies first, Robert1
Wetzel has established himself as
completely up to the standard of the
Players, which is an achievement.
Samuel Bonnell keeps him companyl
in that achievement. Both took every1
opportunity to get the best out of1
their parts-full of opportunities as
they were.,
Paul Faust (the order of excellence
being forgotten by now) is indeed af
credit to the company. He shows ane
ability to- make himself "in part" ii
roles which are diversified and quite
unlike his apparent ordinary charac-
ter. Hailed as a promising youngx
actor from the Haresfoot Club, he hasa
made himself known as a finished per- t
former of high merit.s
And Robert Henderson played Si-c
mon Bliss with his usual ability,c
thoroughly expressive and impressive.
The role was well suited to his abili- b
ty, and while it was not his best, he I
showed his earnestness by playing itv
to the full-a very attractive presenta-e
tion. i
Mrs. Mansfield, while it is difficult
to conceal a lack of experience withA
the company, fit into the atmosphere
of the piece well, doing her work
smoothly and convincingly.
Tomorrow night the Players will .
open their third play, "Gammer Gur-t
ton's Needle," the old English com-
edy, with several novelties of presen-
tation and introducting a new mem-
ber of the company, Charles Edge-n
comb of the Provincetown Playhouseo
in New York. .This work will be giveno
four times, the Friday evening per-
formance being changed to a 3:302
matinee on account of the Senate Re-1
ception in the evening.f
MEXICO CITY.-The government's p
ismissal of Gonzalo Ramirez Carillo,I
iead of the legal division of the de-t
partment of industry, has been follow-t
ed by an order "consigning" him to
the attorney-general for investigation
>f charges of malfeasance in office.

NEVW ARRANGEMENTS
TO SAVE TIME IN
CLASSI FICATIO N
NEW REGISTRATION PLANS GIVE
INFORMATION ON STUDENT
SjTANDINGS

AMERICANS FINISH
WIMBLEDON GAMES
ON NIAGARA FAL"LS, AS
IPRELIMINARY TO TRIP
PARTY WILL LEAVE FRIDAY FOR
UNIVERSITY EXCURSION TO
SCENIC WONDER
TICkETS STILL AVAILABLE
Canadian Falls Wearing Away At Rate
Of Five Or Six Feet Each Year,
Professor Explains

The answer of the head of the Brit-
ish delegation was: "The prospects on
the first day were not as good as I
had hoped, but I will be greatly dis-
appointed if we do not find some;way
to agree."
The naval delegates as a whole ap-
pear to desire to understand British
cruiser requirements, but it was in-
dicated that the United States must
go still higher if Great Britain's needs
are to be fully recognized.
BASEBALL SCORES
American League
St. Louis, 17; Detroit, 8.
New York, 7; Washington, 6.
Boston, 6; Philadelphia, 5.
National League
Pittsburgh, 14; St. Louis, 2.
Chicago, 8; Cincinnati, 5.
LISBON.-As a preventive against
the entry of undesirable elements, the
Portugese government has issued a
drastic decree of vigilance over aliens.
All travelers coming into Portugal
must within 48 hours of their arrival
present documents of identification.
SUMMER DIRECTORIES ON
SALE THURSDAY MORNING
Initial appearance of the Sum-
mer Students' Directory will be
made tomorrow morning, ac-
cording to Thomas D. Olmsted,
Managing Editor. The book will
contain names, addresses, class
designations, home towns and
local telephone numbers of all
Summer session students. It is
to be placed on sale at the State
street bookstores, at tables on
the diagonal, and at several oth-
er convenient locations, and will
be priced at 85 cents.
For those who registered too
late to have their names pub-
lished in the directory, The
Daily wil publish a supplement
to the directory, containing all
the names registered befween
June 30 and July 5. Extra copies
of the issue containing the list
can be purchased at the Press

Anthony H. Fokker has had the
unique experience of having planes
of his design flying over two oceans
at virtually the same time-the Mait-
land-Hegenberger expedition to Ha-
waii and the Byrd expedition to
France.
RECEPTIONS FILL
TIME OF ATLANTIC
FLYERS IN PARIS
t(By Associated Press)
PARIS, July 5.-The American avia-
tors who flew across the Atlantic in
the Columbia and America had an-
other busy day of receptions from
breakfast until dinner in the even-
ing and then they were allowed the1
night hours to do with as they pleas-
ed. 'Some of them decided to get a
well earned rest, while the others
dined privately with friends or at-
tended the tourist trek to Montmartre.
Commander Byrd again was the
center of interest in all the public
appearances the airmen made. With
his gracious way and words he has
captivated the hearts of the French,
as well as their admiration-just as
Lindbergh did before him.
The cross of the Legion of Honor

FRESHMEN NOT INCLUDED
Information And Registration Blanks
To Be Filled 'Out And Returned
Before School Begins
Until this year only the seniors have
been informed of their correct stand-
ing in the University, including the
number of hours credit they have and
the courses still required for gradu-
ation.
Beginning with this summer during
the last week of August, letters will
be sent to all sophomores, junior, and
seniors of the coming year, stating
the hours credit received and the
hours required in the various groups
for their graduation. Instructions
and registration cards will also be
sent out. The information blanks and'
registration cards are to be filled out
by the students and sent in to the
University before the beginning of the
first semester. The fees will be
stamped on the cards before they
are sent; this will enable all the stu-
dents, with the exception of incoming
freshmen, to go direct to the treasur-
er's office for the payment of their
fees.
The new plan will eliminate the
coming in of students to seek infor-
oation in regard to their standing
and the number of hours still needed
to fill the required groups. The
sophomores, juniors, and seniors will
continue on with the old system of
classification.
By this new arrangement it is hoped
y the University officials and especial-
ly by the Recorder's office to do away
with the waste of time and long hours
of waiting that have been undergone
n previous years.
SIXTY TO VISIT
FORD CAR PLANT.
More than sixty students have reg-
istered to take the third excursion of
he Summer session today which con-
sists of an inspection trip through the
plants of the Ford Motor company at
Highland Park, according to an an-1
nouncement made by Carlton F. Wells
of the Rhetoric department, conductor
f the excursion.
The group will gather in front of
Angell hall and leave from there at1
:15 o'clock in special motor busses,
for Highland Park. The main de-
partments of the plant atHighlandby
Plark will be visited, conducted by
special guides, including the motor.
esting and assembling departments,
he unholstering division and the large
tockrooms, of world wide repute.
Special attention and explanation will
be given to the many mechanical de-
vices such as the extensive conveyor
system and the various time saving
machines which have been produced
to insure large scale production.
Mr. Wells announced late yesterday
that all the tickets had been sold for
the trip. The party will return to
Ann Arbor at 5 o'clock.
ATLANTIC CITY IS'
DAMAGEDBY FIRE
(By Associated Press)
ATLANTIC CITY, JULY 5.-Fire to-
lay destroyed eight hotels including
the Prescott, Regent, Lutz Leonard,
nd the Moardwalk, most of which
were 'tall frame structures. The fire,
WOMEN FAC TY MEMBERS
TO BE , "AT HOME" TODAY
Mrs. E. H. Kraus, wife of Dean ;
Kraus of the Summer session,1
and the University Faculty wo-
men will receive the women stu- I

wents of all schools this after-
noon from 4 to 5:30 o'clock in
the parlors of Barbour gym-
nasium. This is the first faculty
"at home" this summer, and will
furnish the opportunity for the
girls to meet their instructors
personally. All women on the
campus are urged to attend this
reception as well as the daily
teas at the same hour.

Helen Wills
American tennid star, who won both
the singles and, with Elizabeth Ryan,
the doubles championships at Wim-
bledon.
COCHET TIUMPHS
IN MEN'S SINGLES
Elizabeth Ryan Paired With Helen
Wills Plays Brilliant Game To
Take Women's Doubles
TILDEN DEFEATED AGAIN
(By Associated Press)
WIMBLEDON, Eng., July 5.-The
1927 Wimbledon tournament closed
today in a blaze of glory for the
United States with four of the five
championships in the hands of Ame-
rican players.
The lone crown that was missing-
the coveted men's singles - was
perched on the brow of little Henri
Cochet, the French ace, who elimi-
nated William T. Tilden in the semi-
finals on his way to his ultimate vic-
tory.
With the women's singles, won by
Helen Wills, and the men's doubles,
won by Tilden andtFrancis T. Hunter,
already captured, the American play-
ers went into the last day's play with
the women's doubles and the mixed
doubles championships as their goal.
Elizabeth Ryan of California was
the bright American star in today's
play. Paired with Miss Wills, she
won the women's doubles from the
South African, Miss "Bobbie" Heime
and Mrs. J. Peacock, and then return-
ed to the court after a few minutes
rest and with Hunter raced through
the semi-finals of the mixed doubles,
winning from another South African
team, Louis Raymond and the same
little "Bobbie" Heime.
Later, as the curtain was about to
be run down over Wimbledon of 1927,
she appeared again with Hunter
against L. A. Godfrey and Mrs. Katie
McCain Godfred to win the mixed
doubles title after a stubbornly fought
battle in the first set. The display of
fortitude and stamina given by the
California girl in her three appear-
ances aroused the keenest admiration
from the spectators.
starting at the Scattergood amusement
concession consumed the boardwalk
from Missouri to Arkansas avenues.
Debries scattered from the beach when
the flames reached an exhibition of
the Remington Arms company, at Col-
umbia place at Boardwalk, where 20,-
000 rounds of ammunition were stor-
ed.
Eight hotels and rooming houses
sent vacationists scurrying to the
street. Most of them were on the
beach at the time, however.
Just before the Remington Arms
exhibition went down in flames, a
loud rat-tat-tat started up and con-
tinued but no one was hurt by the
bursting shells.

As a preliminary to the University
I excursion to Niagara Falls which
leaves Ann Arbor next Friday Dr.
Kirtley F. Mather, chairman of the
committee on Geology o Harvard
University and professor in the De-
partment of Geology this summer,
litesented, in the Natural Science
anuditorium yesterday afternoon an
illustrated lecture on the history and
development of Niagara Falls.
Dr. Mather first spoke of the
beauty and gradeur of the Falls and
the first pictures that he showed were
j a review of the Niagara river as it
left Lake Erie, swept through the
rapids, over the falls, down the gorge,
(and finally reached the Lewiston abut-
ment. He then referred to the geo-
logical changes which the pheno-
menon represents and to the fact
that while the Horseshoe falls are
wearing away at the rate of five or
six feet a year the American falls
show little change.
At the beginning of his lecture Dr.
Mather announced that the tickets for
the boat and rail portion of the trip
could be procured between the hours
of one-thirty and four-thirty, Thurs-
day afternoon, in Room 8, University
hall. Also that if anyone who is in-
Stending to go and has not registered
as yet that he could do this by simply
writing his name upon a slip of paper
and dropping it in the box outside
the lecturer's office in the Natural
Science building.
Stockwell To Play
Beethoven Sonata
Royden SusumAgo, tenor, and Ne
B. Stockwell, pianist, of the Universi-
ty School of Music, will provide an
interesting program in the first of this
summer's complimentary concerts in
Hill auditorium, Wednesday, July 6th,
at 8:00 o'clock. Mr. Susumago is a
singer of unusual talent, who gradu-
ated from the University School of
Music with the degree of Bachelor of
Music in June, after having made a
remarkable record as a student. Be-
fore coming to Ann Arbor from his
native Hawaiithe had attracted wide
attention both there and in portions
of the United Statese where he had
visited. Miss Stockwell is a pianist
who has frequently been heard in Ann
Arbor, and always given a good ac-
count of herself. She will contribute
two groups of numbers.
The program is as follows:
Sonata, Op. 26 ............Beethoven
Andante con Variazioni,
Scherzo,
Marcia funebre sulla morte d'un
eroe,
Rondo,
Nell B. Stockwell
Per la Gloria ............Buononcini
Carmela Spanish-California Folk Song
La Donna e Mobile..........Verdi
Royden.Susumago
"Suleika"s.............Mendelssohn
Rush Hour in HongKong .. .Chasins
Impromptn, Op. 90. No. 4 ..Schubert
Scherzo..... ...Carlier
Nell B. Stockwell
Blue Are Her Eyes ...........Watts
Spirit Flower ....... Campbell-Tipton
The Unforseen ........Cyril Scott
Love's Messenger .......... LaForge
Royden Susumago.
Accompanist, Donna Esselstyn
urW eat er8an

will be conferred upon Commander
Byrd, the government having decided
today to honor him in this manner.j
The same decoration may also be con-
ferred upon Acosta, Noville and Bal-
chen, Byrd's three companions on the'
flight, but this it not yet definitely de-
termined.
The commander also was presented
with the gold medal of the French
Aero club. This medal was awarded
to Colonel Lindbergh.

PHILIPPINE STUDENTS ENGAGE
IN NATIVE PASTIME OF 'SIPA'

Demonstrating a dexterity in kick-
ing that would be the envy of many
football players, a group of Philip-
pine students have been engaging re-
cently in a native game, "Sipa," which
they have played near Morris hall
and in front of Angell hall. The game
consists of kicking a ball, about the
size of an indoor baseball, made of
interwoven rattan, about between
several players formed in a circle.
One of the most common though
apparently most difficult methods of
kicking is to let the ball come down
behind one's back, and then kick it
back over his head with the heel, mak-
ing it go straight out forward into
the circle. A player may kick with
his heel, toe, or the side of his foot.
At times the ball goes twenty or
thirty feet into the air, and a group
of players can keep it in the air kick-
ing it often thirty or forty times with-

out letting it touch the ground.
As the game is played in the Philip-
pines, those who miss a kick are
eliminated from the play. It is said
that the old custom of the natives was
to whip those who could not stay in
the game under this system. The of-
ficial "Sipa" ball is solid, of inter-
woven rattan, while that used by the
players on the campus here is hollow.)
and quite light.
The students who engage in this
game are all members of the Philip-
pine-Michigan club, an organization
of a large number of students from
the islands, under the direction of
Prof. J. R. Hayden, of the political
science department, who was for a
year exchange professor in the Uni-
versity of the Philippines. He is con-
ducting a round table on the islands
at the Institute of Politics at Williams
college this summer.

-Thinks that tomorrow it will prob-
ably be cloudy and warmer.

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