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August 14, 1927 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1927-08-14

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i:

P4GE TWO

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 1927

PAGE TWO THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 1927

another idea to offer when he blames
the failure of the naval conference on
the American press. He couldn't ua-
derstand, he says, why the United
Published every morning except Monday States wanted large cruisers although
during the University Summer Session by of c
the Board in Control of Student Publica- ourse this was only said for the
tions. effect it would have on Mr. Bridge-

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TOASED RLL~

Refresh yourself by our iced
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of our fresh candy, made daily.
Sweetland,
212 S. Main St.

titled to the use for republicatio- of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited ii this paper and the local news pub-
lished herein.
The Associated Press is exclusively e-
Entered at the Ann Arbor, Michigan.,
-otoffice as second class matter.
Subscription by carrier, $1.5o; by mail,
$2.00.
offices: Press Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4926
MANAGINGEDITOR
PHILIP C. BROOKS1
City Editor.....Joseph E. Brunswick
Feature Editor.....Marian L. Welles
Night Editors
John E. Davis H. IK. Oakes, Jr.
T. E. Sunderland Orville Dowzer
Reporters
Robert E. Carson Miriam Mitchell
Wm. K. Lomason Mary Lister
Bert Heideman W. Harold May
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
LAURANCE J. VAN TUYL
kdvertising.............Ray Wachter
Accounts.........John Ruswinckel
Assistants
C. T. Antonopulos S. S. Berar
G. W. Platt
Night Editor-JOS. E. BRUNSWICK'
SUNDAY AUGUST 14, 1927
THE DAILY THIS SUMMER
This is the last issue of the 1927
Summer Michigan Daily. It is pitiable,
in a way, that this must be the last
number, because there are still so
many things remaining to be reform-
ed and criticised, but the summer ses-
sion ends in less than a week and it
would be rather inadvisable to con-
tinue publication after the close of
school.
The Daily has no apologies to make
at the close of this Summer session,
and it will make none. It has con-
scientiously attempted to cover the
news events of the campus duriing
the season closed, and in its own
opinion, at least, it has succeeded to
some small degree. It has received
generous support from the students
of the University in subscriptions
and from the local advertisers, and
for both of these facts it is very grate-
ful.

man's constituents, for he knows as
well as anyone that when a navy has
coaling stations as far apart as the
United States' navy it needs ships that
will travel from one to the other.
« Mr. Bridgeman, of course, is doubt-
less a rank hypocrite when he says
he couldn't understand this, but such
drivel "gets by" with the public, and
the English probably think that he
is a great man. He himself did all
in his power to assure the success of
the conference, even giving two briar
pipes to the leading American dele-
gates as he says. That places the
blame for the failure squarely on
America.
Perhaps another conference to set-
tle the question of blame for the fail-
ure of the last one would be a wise
idea, and in keeping with the childish
antics of the so-called statesmen.
Neither nation is to blame, of course,
for politicians are always right, but
still the conference did fail, in spite
of the briar pipes.

THE
One of
about the
has been

SUMMER LECTURES
the most fortunate things
Summer session just closed
the excellent series of

Editorially it has
which at times were
and it appreciates

taken stands
rather shocking
the fact that

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never once has it been intimidated or
threatened by the Board in Control of
Student Publication. It has conscien-
tiously endeavored to be right, andl
feeling justified, has been fearless and
sometimes bitter in its condemnation.
If anyone has been injured in his
feelings, particularly any local person,
Th'e Daily feels very contrite; but The
Daily still feels that it was right-
at least in its own conscience, and
therefore will not apologize.
A word of praise is also due, per-
haps, to the business department of
the publication, which, though com-
posed of only four men during the
entire summer, excluding carriers,
functioned rather efficiently, and at
times it is reported that a majority
of our subscribers received their pap-
ers on the same morning they were
published. (This is only a rumor.)
Nevertheless the' business manager
has a difficult task,.which he has per-
formed well, and since he will never
have access to these columns, and
would certainly find it impossible to
intimidate them if he did gain access,
it is only fitting that the editorial
department recognize that rather im-
portant functionary which pays its
salary, the Business Manager.
The Daily should also thank the
Summer session students, who though
largely without newspaper experience
before the beginning of the session,
performed assiduously and ably on the
staff this summer. To them is due, in
no small measure, any praise which.
the publication may deserve, for they
have performed the routine tasks of.
reporting and news gathering. Their
names are too numerous to list in-
dividually, but collectively The Daily,
extends to them its highest praise.,
That is about all there is to say.,
The summer has no doubt been suc-

summer lectures which have been
furnished free of charge under the
auspices of the University. Some of
the leading men in the country in
their respective fields have partici-
pated in these programs, and in addi-
tion to the professors from our own
University,, eight men from other
institutions have appeared on the
Sprograms.
One thing that is regrettable about
the whole series, however, is the fact
that the student patronage and at-
tendance has been comparatively
small. It is true, to be sure, that the
audiences have been larger on the
average than for any other summer
series which has ever been presented,
but the bulk of the listeners were
townspeople rather than students.
It is rather an insult to the suppos-
edly superior intelligence of the col-
lege world to find that when given
an even opportunity for attendance at
highly educational offerings it is
outnumbered so decisively by persons
who can have nothing except a very
sincere interest in the learning about
them. Still, the lectures have been
highly successful, and those who have
attended have gained a great deal. It
has been a remarkably fine series, bet-
ter than that of the winter by far, and
the University appreciates highly the
efforts of the eminent men who have
contributed so ably to its success.
THE BUN
The Republican party has now ap-
peared with a pamphlet crediting it-
self with the entire reduction in the
national debt, and extolling its econ-
omy plan. Republicans are good poli-
ticians, but they should be honest, and
explain that during the period of pros-
perity just closing they couldn't very
well help the national surplus, in spite
of the tax reductions they have given
to the firms of Mr. Mellon and the
high income tax papers.
The American public may be gull-
ible but the Republicans have even
exceeded moderate limits with this
newest affront.
NO DIVORCE THIS TIME
Constance Talmadge, revered by the
American public as a popular movie
star, has announced that she will seek
no divorce during her present trip to
Paris. She adds, of course, that in
the near future she will certainly in-
stitute divorce proceedings against
her husband, Captain MacIntosh, as
she simply can't stand it to live with
him, but that perhaps she will wait
several weeks before undertaking
such steps.
Of course the American public
which respects the peroxide actress
so highly will see nothing wrong in
this, for movie actors and actresses
are supposed to be re-married each
year or two, but to the more conserva-
tive temperament of the self respect-
ing part of that public there may
seem to be somthing that is not en-
tir'ely right in the proceedings after
all. To be sure this Talmadge woman
has been married to the same man

William Thompson of Chicago, can-
didate for president.
* * *
ANN ARBOR, Mich, Aug. 13.-Ben-
jamin Jurnell, father of the Rools
third party, turned down the nomina-
tion for vice president here today
after being chosen by a unanimous
choice on the first ballot. "I do not
choose to run in 1928" he said.
ANN ARBOR, Mich-still August.-
With the dithdrawal of Purnell, the
With the withdrawal of Purnell, the
balloting for vice president became
candidates were nominated. Their
votes on the second ballot were as
followes: Barber Bim 600, Prudence
Prim 590, Calvin Cooldige 25, Gover-
nor Fuller 0, Judge Thayer 30, New
York Stock Exchange 100. (Due to an
error the first figure has been record-
ed as the vote of a candidate; it is
not, being the capacitl of the conven-
tion hall.)
ANN ARBOR, also.-Pandemonium
broke loose in the Rolls Third Party
convention here this afternoon when
it was discovered at the close of the
32nd ballot that Prudence Phim, lead-
ing candidate, was dead. The official
dispatch from the official spokesman
of Prudence at the Summer White
House follows: "Regret to inform you
that Prudence Phim, White House
collie, has been dead for three weeks.
Appreciate very highly the compli-
ment you have paid to the official
family by ojering to nominate her.
Signed, Cal, Prudence spokesman."
* * *
ANN ARBOR again.-Clarence Dar-
row lead all candidates for, the Rolls
Third Party vice-presidentail nomina-
tion at the close of the 33rd ballot.
Darrow is a dark horse and has been
trailing doggedly since the early bal-
lots.
ANN ARBOR still.-Darrow's lead
is wiped out on 34th ballot as Presi-
dent Shumaker of the Indiana anti-
saloon league, recently released from
jail, appears amid tumulauous ap-
plause.. Shumaker lacks a majority
by one vote.
ANN ARBO, getting later.-Shu-
maker eliminated from race as Sena-
tor Jim Reed discloses slush fund.
Reed committee proves that Shumaker
bought votes by promiscuous distri-
bution of Hershey bars. Shumaker
bolts the convention. Delegates are
in a frenzy of excitement as balloting
enters 36th round.
* * *
ANN ARBOR, yet.-On the 36th bal-
lot Honest Bill Thompson received
the nomination for vice-president on
Rolls -National Party ticket but was
forced to decline because he had al-
ready been nominated for the presi-
dency. He said that some one from
other parts of the country should be
nominated to give the ticket balance.
On the 37th ballot six men were
nominated but all found that they
could not accept the position since
all six of them could not run and one
vice-president is all the party can
use.
After this ballot the meting adjourn-
ed for lunch and wire-pulling.
ANN ARBOR.-At several secret
meeting at the Whitney hotel it
seemed that the politicians were find-
ing a way out of the difficulty of find-
ing a vice-presidential candidate. Re-
ports circulating about the town were
that Vare of Pennsylvania would
be given the job. Reasons stated
were that he was one man who knew
how to get votes, even if they were

Still in ANN ARBOR.-On the 38th
not cast for the party.
ballot Vare was being pushed hard,,
he came within a few votes of get-
ting the nomination. On the 39th
ballot Vare was nominated as run-
ning mate for Hoest Bill Thompson,
presidential nominee - of Rolls Na-
tional Party.
Big Honest Bill announced late to-
day that the party slogan would say
something about honesty in politics,
nothing else would be tolerated. He
also announced that George E. Bren-
nan would be elected chairman of the
National committee to run the cam-
paign.
-Kernel, Jeb and Mefistofele.
conscience in the public servants who
entertain them. It has never occurred
to this public that such an attitude
constitutes hypocrisy of a vicious
type, but it is time that this thought

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Fountain Pens Loose Leaf Notebooks
Drawing Instruments Stationery

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One block from Hill
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cessful from an academic standpoint i --- ------tG 4411, t--t
esudemnsher, anad thatinallt now since last February, and that is
for the students here, and that is all a long period for a movie actress, but
that could be asked. With this final even so there seems to be something
curtsey, then, the 1927 Summer Daily fundamentally unsound in the loose
passes from the picture for good. It attitude of these movie folk toward
has been editorially fearless, and jour- some of the standards of society.
nalistically as thorough as could be If we disregard the attitude of the
expected in such warmn weather, progressive clergymen, and stand for
Paul J. Kern. morality, it is rather inexcusable that
an institution such as marriage should
PERHAPS ANOTHER CONFERENCE be defamed by the lowest iinstincts off
TO FIX THE BLAME the Hollywood morons. The public"
W. C. Bridgeman, first lord of the that would ostracise such actions on
admiralty and senior British delegate the part of one of its members, can I

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